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Oregon Summer Reading Certificates

​Use the certificates

Staff at schools and libraries in Oregon may download, print, and distribute summer reading certificates to people who, 1) read ten books during the summer, or 2) completed their school or library's summer reading log, reading challenge, or reading goals.

 

The 2017 Oregon summer reading certificates were designed by Andrea McAllister from Dallas Public Library and library staff who wanted to remain anonymous from McMinnville Public Library, Springfield Public library, and Waldport Public Library--thank you all!

 

Research shows youth can maintain or improve their reading skills during summer vacation by choosing to read in their free time, listening to books or articles written above their reading level read aloud, choosing the materials they want to read or listen to, reading or listening to diverse types of reading materials, talking about what they read or listen to with peers and adults, and developing a habit of reading regularly. Oregon summer reading certificates recognize and commend youth for reading during their summer break from school.

 

Get ideas for paying to print the certificates

In the past, a donation was used to pay for hardcopies of the Oregon Summer Reading Certificates to be printed and distributed to schools and libraries. Those funds are no longer available. Therefore, schools and libraries must pay to print the certificates themselves. Here are a few ideas:

  • Public libraries may use their Ready to Read Grant.
  • Ask your Friends of the Library or Library Foundation or Parent Teacher Association to pay for them.
  • Ask a local civic organization like Kiwanis, Lions, or Rotary for a donation.
  • Ask local businesses for donations and recognize their donations—e.g. create a bulletin board or display where you recognize all summer reading supporters, submit a newspaper article thanking donors, put donors’ logos on summer reading fliers or other promotional materials.
  • Ask a local print shop to provide an in-kind donation—i.e. they would print the certificates at no cost to the library, and the library would acknowledge their contribution in some way.

 

Ask questions

Contact Katie Anderson if you have any questions.