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Patterson Bridge Project
History

The Isaac Lee Patterson bridge, located near the Rogue River's mouth, was completed in late 1931, with limited traffic initially allowed across. Prior to that time, vehicles crossed the river by ferry. The bridge's formal dedication took place May 28, 1932, with hundreds of people from throughout the South Coast celebrating the opening. The bridge is 1932 feet long and at the time of its construction was the longest structure between San Francisco and the Columbia River.
Patterson Bridge Antique PictureThe Rogue River (Gold Beach) Bridge, has been recognized by the American Society of Civil Engineers as a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark.Designed by bridge engineer Conde B. McCullough in 1931, and dedicated to Isaac Lee Patterson in 1932, The Gold Beach Bridge is the first bridge in the United States to utilize the Freyssinet method of arch decentering (precompression) and stress adjustment of arch ribs.
The complex method, introduced by French engineer Eugene Freyssinet, reduced the size of arch ribs, needing less concrete and reinforcing steel to construct the bridge. Freyssinet's method was instrumental in the development of prestressing of structural concrete bridge members, which is considered a common construction practice today.
Isaac Lee Patterson Bio
 
McCullough has attained international recognition for the large-scale structures he designed to span the major rivers and estuaries along the Oregon Coast, completing the Oregon Coast Highway in the 1930's. These bridges, which include the Rogue River (Gold Beach, the Yaquina Bay, the Alsea Bay, the Coos Bay (McCullough), the Siuslaw (Florence), the Umpqua (Reedsport), the Wilson river, Tenmile Creek, and a number of smaller scale concrete structures, were constructed
from the early 1920's to mid-1930's, completing the route of the coast highway from Washington to California. The completion of this route was a major factor in the development of commerce and tourism in Oregon's coastal regions, and has since become one of the most notable scenic routes in the United States.