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ODOT Research Unit - Active Projects

SPR 750

Strengthening Methods for Deficient Flexural Steel Anchorages in Bridge Girders
 
Project Coordinator Steve Soltesz
Research Agency:    Oregon State University
Principal Investigator:   Christopher Higgins
Start Date for ODOT:  July 2012
Completion Date for ODOT: December 2014

 
OVERVIEW 

Many of Oregon’s reinforced concrete deck girder(RCDG) bridges built in the 1950’s have
significant diagonal shear cracks. Because flexural steel anchorages in RCDG bridges have
limited reserve capacity and no proven flexural strengthening methods have been validated,
otherwise serviceable bridges cannot be effectively rehabilitated and may need to be replaced or
posted.


Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) strips adhered to the concrete surface is the most
expedient method for flexural strengthening, but strengthening for flexure near a crack is
problematic because the crack tends to cause the strips to peel away when loaded. Near-surface
mounted carbon fiber reinforced polymer (NSM-CFRP) may be an effective strengthening
system even near cracks. However this technique has not been proven specifically for
strengthening the steel reinforcement anchorages; therefore, design methods are lacking. In
addition, because the retrofitted strengthening elements will be oriented across existing shear
stirrups, the cut groove with fiber strip approach used for shear strengthening may need to be
modified to avoid cutting the stirrups.

OBJECTIVES:  

The objective of the research is to provide proven options for strengthening the flexural
anchorage on cracked reinforced concrete girders.

   
Strengthening Methods for Deficient Flexural Steel Anchorages in Bridge Girders Work Plan 

Quarterly Reports:

FY 13
FY 14 
qtr. 1 qtr. 1
 
 
qtr. 2
 
qtr. 3 qtr. 3
 
 
 qtr. 4 
 
 

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SPR 752

Proof of Concept; GTFS Data as a Basis for Optimization of Large Scale Transit Networks
 
Project Coordinator Lyn Cornell
Research Agency:    Oregon State University
Principal Investigator:   David Porter/David Kim
Start Date for ODOT:  July 9, 2012
Completion Date for ODOT: December 31, 2013
 
OVERVIEW: 
Most transit agencies use General Transit Feed Specification (GTFS) as a common format for
describing characteristics of their transit network such as schedules, stop times, stop locations,
trips and routes. ODOT lacks a tool to use the GTFS data to analyze the performance of the
larger state or regional transit network.

 
OBJECTIVES:  
The project will develop a prototype computer-based open sourced tool that uses existing GTFS
data. This data can be used to analyze existing state-wide and region-wide transit networks
within Oregon.

    
Proof of Concept; GTFS Data as a Basis for Optimization of Large Scale Transit Networks Work Plan  
  
 

Quarterly Reports:




FY 13
FY 14 
qtr. 1
 
 
qtr. 2
 qtr. 2 
 
qtr. 3
 
 
 
 
 

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SPR 753

Transportation Performance Measures for Statewide Outcomes-Based Management
 
Project Coordinator Myra Sperley
Research Agency:    Cambridge Systematics
Principal Investigator:   Steven Pickrell
Start Date for ODOT:  July 26, 2012
Completion Date for ODOT: March 31, 2014
 
OVERVIEW: 
Many of the performance measures that ODOT analyzes and reports on are used by individual
units or sections but have the potential for broader applications, and others may be useful in
tracking progress but do not provide the right type of information necessary to help make
decisions. As a whole, these measures do not currently function together to draw a clear picture
of how the transportation system is functioning.
 
This research project will build on existing efforts within the agency (e.g. alternative mobility
measures research, safety performance measures, and Least Cost Planning / Mosaic) to identify
decision making performance measures, outcome based performance measures, and
consideration of other strategic planning measures, seeking to identify those indicators most
informative, measurable, and consistent.

 
OBJECTIVES:  
This project will recommend a set of statewide transportation performance measures, as well as
improved/enhanced data collection, analysis, and reporting methods that help to get the most
benefit out of existing measures and that make possible the new measures which are better
aligned with FHWA and State outcome areas and provide better support to decision making.   
   
Transportation Performance Measures for Statewide outcomes-Based Management Work Plan  
  
 
Quarterly Reports:

FY 13
FY 14 
qtr. 1
 
 
qtr. 2
 qtr. 2 
 
qtr. 3 qtr. 3
 
 
 
 

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SPR 754

Design and Implementation of Pedestrian and Bicycle-Specific Data Collection Methods in Oregon
 
Project Coordinator Lyn Cornell
Research Agency:    Portland State University
Principal Investigator:   Miquel Figliozzi/Chris Monsere
Start Date for ODOT:  August 1, 2012
Completion Date for ODOT: March 31, 2014
 
OVERVIEW: 
There is extensive experience, equipment, and procedures to collect and analyze continuous and
short duration motorized vehicle count data. These data have many valuable uses for the
transportation agencies support safety, forecasting, and performance monitoring activities. This
is not the case for non-motorized travel.
There is a need for pedestrian and bicycle count data to properly design improvements on
sidewalks, crosswalk, cycle tracks, bike boxes, and signalized traffic crossings (green time
allocation, pedestrian and bicycle-specific signals, dedicated signal phases). In addition, nonmotorized
volume data are needed to evaluate the performance of new investments, as input for
new safety analysis tools used in the AASHTO Highway Safety Manual, to inform health
assessments, and to assess multimodal transportation trends. 
OBJECTIVES:  
  
This proposal focuses on research and evaluation of pedestrian and bicycle available collection methods, data retrieval and storage, and data analysis. The outcome of this research will be a plan for long-term implementation and data collection guidance. The implementation plan will identify a minimum level of hardware placement to start the program and how to invest in data collection over time as resources become available. The data collection plan will include recommendations and guidelines regarding data collection procedures, temporal and spatial sampling, and factoring methods to adequately capture weather and seasonal effects and/or daily/hourly variations of pedestrian and bicycle volumes. The outcomes of this research respond to recommendations recently made in the ODOT Bicycle and Pedestrian Travel Assessment Report [6]. The primary emphasis of this research will be placed on collecting data on bicycle and pedestrian trips on or near roadways and multi-use paths that serve a transportation purpose.


  
Design and Implementation of Pedestrian and Bicycle-Specific Data Collection Methods in Oregon Work Plan  
  
 
Quarterly Reports:

FY 13
FY 14 
qtr. 1
 
 
 
qtr. 3
 
 
 
 
 

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SPR 755

Performance Based Selection of RAP-RAS in Asphalt Mixtures
 
Project Coordinator Norris Shippen
Research Agency:    Oregon State University
Principal Investigator:   Chris Bell
Start Date for ODOT:  October 4, 2012
Completion Date for ODOT: February 28, 2014
 
OVERVIEW: 
ODOT currently uses recycled asphalt materials (RAM), which are is typically recycled asphalt
pavement (RAP) and recycled asphalt shingles (RAS), to help reduce the costs. The current
limits on RAM are restricted based upon local and national experience. The intent of this study is
to use performance based tests to evaluate mixtures with increased RAM content, resulting in
minimizing the potential cost, and providing environmental and performance benefits.
ODOT currently allows the use of RAM in its HMAC without any adjustments to the virgin
binder grade. The effect of the recycled asphalts on the final binder grading is unknown. This
may lead to a HMAC product that is more susceptible to early fatigue or thermal cracking. This
study will also explore approaches to evaluate the selection of appropriate binder grade. 

 
OBJECTIVES:  
Guidelines will be developed for selecting RAM content by using binder and mix performance
criteria. A study will be conducted to identify binder and mix properties related to cracking and
permanent deformation. Acceptable properties will be established by an evaluation of a range of
lab produced mixtures, with subsequent validation by trial projects and testing of plant produced
mix. In the absence of a full suite of performance tests, blended binder properties targets could
be the criteria, however the ultimate goal will be to establish minimum criteria for mix properties
with particular focus on how to determine the impacts on age related, cold temperature and
fatigue cracking. Also, appropriate triggers will be developed for virgin binder replacement
percentages and/or base binder grade changes to accommodate the effects of the RAM and
develop a RAM QC/QA testing program.
 
Performance Based Selection of RAP-RAS in Asphalt Mixture Work Plan  
  
 
Quarterly Reports:

FY 13
FY 14 
FY 15
qtr. 1
 qtr. 1 
 
qtr. 2
 
qtr. 3 qtr. 3
 
 
 
 

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SPR 756

Improved Safety Performance Functions for Signalized Intersections
 
Project Coordinator Mark Joerger
Research Agency:    Texas Transportation Institute
Principal Investigator:   Karen Dixon
Start Date for ODOT:  April 18, 2013
Completion Date for ODOT: October 18, 2014
 
OVERVIEW: 
The 1st edition of the AASHTO Highway Safety Manual (HSM) was published in 2010 and
included predictive safety performance functions (SPFs) for rural two-lane, rural multi-lane, and
urban and suburban arterials. Interestingly, the currently adopted SPFs and their associated
predictive methods do not explicitly address intersection approach speed. The goal of this
research effort is to develop signalized SPFs for a range of approach speeds so as to determine
how the speed influences safety at these locations.
 
OBJECTIVES:  
The project will prepare a brief that will help ODOT and other Oregon agencies understand how
to apply the Highway Safety Manual (HSM) Safety Performance Factors (SPFs) for signalized
intersection locations. This effort may include the creation of a “smart” spreadsheet or similar if
appropriate. The project team will make recommendations to ODOT about the use of these SPFs
and how they compare to the current methods provided in the HSM. 
FY 14
FY 15 
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qtr. 2
 
 
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SPR 757

Bluetooth Data Collection System for Planning and Arterial Management
 
Project Coordinator Mark Joerger
Research Agency:    Oregon State University
Principal Investigator:   David Kim
Start Date for ODOT:  August 20, 2012
Completion Date for ODOT: March 31, 2014
 
OVERVIEW: 
An OSU research team has completed research that, in conjunction with a software application in
development, will allow ODOT’s ITS Unit to monitor transportation system travel times and
provide more complete and timely traveler information to the public at a low cost. The research
proposed in this problem statement will build on this completed research and more fully explore
how wireless technology can be used to support planning and traffic operations data collection
and analysis needs.
 
OBJECTIVES:  
· Develop a portable system for wireless automatic collection of vehicle movement data.
· Use the system to complete Origin-Destination study data collection.
· Collect data for simulation models and assess how the results compare to standard practice.
· Apply the system to monitor intersection performance.
· Apply the system to monitor the performance of arterials and advanced traffic signal systems. 

  
Bluetooth Data Collection System for Planning and Arterial Management Work Plan  
  
 
Quarterly Reports:

FY 13
FY 14 
qtr. 1 qtr. 1
 
 
qtr. 2
 
qtr. 3 qtr. 3
 
 
 
 

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SPR 758

Appropriate Width of Filter Strips for Natural Dispersion of Stormwater in Western Oregon 
 
Project Coordinator Matthew Mabey
Research Agency:    Oregon State University
Principal Investigator:   Chad Higgins
Start Date for ODOT:  May 6, 2013
Completion Date for ODOT: August 31, 2015
 
OVERVIEW: 
Infiltration is being emphasized as an important technique for managing stormwater. Dispersion
of highway runoff in roadside filter strips or separate dispersal areas is a cost effective
stormwater management technique that provides both water quality and flow control benefits.
Determining the width of the dispersion area needed to infiltrate the design storm is necessary to
identify the amount of right-of-way needed and if additional BMPs are required. Research to
establish an equation for sizing dispersion areas in western Oregon is needed.

 
OBJECTIVES:    
The objective of this research is to expand the data set and understanding of Washington’s LID
Design Equation” to the point that an equivalent design approach that is applicable to western
Oregon can be developed.

  
Appropriate Width of Filter Strips for Natural Dispersion of Stormwater in Western Oregon Work Plan  
  

Quarterly Reports:

FY 13
FY 14 
FY 15
qtr. 1
 
 
qtr. 3
 
 
 
 

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SPR 759

Capturing Multimodal Comparisons in Freight Project Prioritization

 

Project Coordinator Lyn Cornell
Research Agency:    University of Washington & OSU
Principal Investigator:   Anne Goodchild and Starr McMullen
Start Date for ODOT:  September 25, 2012
Completion Date for ODOT: March 15, 2015

 

OVERVIEW

 Existing tools used to compare multi-modal investments are not sufficient to measure their economic and environmental impact or accurately evaluate tradeoffs between modes.   Previous studies resulted in identifying new and supplemental multimodal freight investment criteria, including the ConnectOregon program, but did not identify any methodologies for prioritizing multimodal investment projects using these criteria.
 
OBJECTIVES
 
Previous work has identified the need to evaluate the impact of a modal project on other modes, but failed to describe how existing tools (if any exist) would perform the calculations and any inconsistencies between modal calculations that might affect comparisons. This project will develop a methodology to make comparisons across modes for use in intermodal comparison purposes and it will clearly identify the analytical gaps, and where possible, make recommendations for feasible solutions.

  

Capturing Multimodal Comparisons in Freight Project Prioritization Work Plan  
  
 
Quarterly Reports:

FY 13
FY 14 
qtr. 1
 
 
 
 
qtr. 3
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

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SPR 760

Multimodal Performance Measures: Developing a Transportation Cost Index
 
Project Coordinator Xiugang (Joe) Li
Research Agency: Portland State University
Principal Investigator: Liming Wang, Jenny Liu
Start Date for ODOT: September 20, 2013
Completion Date for ODOT: April 30, 2015
 
OVERVIEW
Recent federal and state laws are placing increasing emphasis on using comprehensive
transportation performance measures that include mobility, safety, economy, livability, equity,
and environment to guide transportation decision making. Proof-of-concept research in SPR 375
developed a Transportation Cost Index (TCI) for use in comparing transportation performance
outcomes for different modes in common terms. The TCI accomplishes this by building on the
concept of the widely-used Consumer Price Index (CPI). As a result of the logic appeal of the
TCI and the proof-of-concept research, this measure was adopted by the Accessibility Indicator
Development Team (IDT) for the Oregon LCP project. The aim of this research project is to
advance the TCI from the proof-of-concept stage to implementation in transportation
performance measurement and decision-making at the state, MPO, and community levels.
 
OBJECTIVES
The goal of this research is to develop, evaluate, and operationalize the TCI for immediate
implementation in state-wide application as a comprehensive multi-modal performance measure
capable of combining modes, transportation infrastructure and services, and land use
information. To reach this goal, this research aims to subject the TCI prototype developed at
ODOT to a rigorous academic investigation, identify and evaluate data sources, operationalize
and test TCI measure for validity in three locations of different scales in Oregon, and prepare it
for adoption in state-wide applications. 
 
 
FY 14
FY 15 
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qtr. 2
 
 
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SPR 761

 
Evaluation of Weather Based Variable Speed Limit Systems
 
Project Coordinator Jon Lazarus
Research Agency: Portland State University/Western Transportation Institute
Principal Investigator: Robert Bertini/Ahmed Al-Kaisey
Start Date for ODOT: September 5, 2013
Completion Date for ODOT: December 31, 2015
 
OVERVIEW
Increasingly, variable speed limit (VSL) and variable advisory speed (VAS) systems have been
used around the world, and in the U.S., to provide traffic- and weather-responsive guidance for
drivers in order to achieve the goals mentioned above. By sensing the traffic and/or weather
conditions, advisory speed limits can be displayed that are suited to real-time conditions and can
warn drivers about congestion and speed conditions ahead. While shown to be cost-effective,
ATM and specifically VSL do require significant investments in hardware and software, data
collection/management and maintenance. In an environment of limited resources clear criteria
are needed to aid in deployment decisions.
 
Two VSL projects being deployed in Oregon, with five additional systems under various levels
of development in the state. ODOT is currently constructing an ATM Project along OR 217,
which is operating at or above capacity with closely spaced interchanges and crash rates and
congestion higher than regional averages. The OR 217 ATM Project includes variable advisory
speeds (based on measured flows and speeds), posting real time travel times, queue warning, and
a weather responsive curve warning system spanning seven miles of highway.
 
The US 26 and OR 35 Mt. Hood Safety and Traveler information project (67 miles) will install a
VSL and variable message sign (VMS) system to improve safety along this corridor (a large
percentage of crashes occur on snow and ice, linked to inexperienced and overconfident drivers
traveling too fast for conditions). A Road Weather Information System (RWIS) will collect realtime
winter weather information at along US 26 and OR 35 to allow precise conditions to be
monitored. The completed weather-controlled VSL on both corridors will utilize traffic speed
and volume detection, weather information, and road surface condition technology to determine
appropriate speeds at which drivers should be traveling. These advisory or regulatory speeds will
then be displayed on overhead or roadside VMS or dynamic message signs (DMS).
 
OBJECTIVES
The goal of this project is to evaluate the effectiveness of two new active traffic management
(ATM) system projects featuring VSL and VAS components being installed on OR 217 (urban)
and US 26/OR 35 (rural/mountain), to aid in optimizing the operation of these systems as well as
laying the groundwork for future implementations of ATM and VSL systems across the state.
The two systems in Region 1 are the first of potentially many more projects to be implemented.
 
FY 14
FY 15 
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qtr. 2
 
 
qtr. 3
 
 
 
 
 
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SPR 762

 
High Strength Steel Reinforcement for Bridges
 
Project Coordinator Steve Soltesz
Research Agency: Oregon State University
Principal Investigator: David Trejo
Start Date for ODOT: September 25, 2013
Completion Date for ODOT: December 31, 2016
 
OVERVIEW
Recent federal and state laws are placing increasing emphasis on using comprehensive
transportation performance measures that include mobility, safety, economy, livability, equity,
and environment to guide transportation decision making. Proof-of-concept research in SPR 375
developed a Transportation Cost Index (TCI) for use in comparing transportation performance
outcomes for different modes in common terms. The TCI accomplishes this by building on the
concept of the widely-used Consumer Price Index (CPI). As a result of the logic appeal of the
TCI and the proof-of-concept research, this measure was adopted by the Accessibility Indicator
Development Team (IDT) for the Oregon LCP project. The aim of this research project is to
advance the TCI from the proof-of-concept stage to implementation in transportation
performance measurement and decision-making at the state, MPO, and community levels.
 
OBJECTIVES
The objective of this research is to generate datasets of key mechanical properties for ASTM
A706 Grade 80 reinforcing steel and modify design equations based on the datasets so that the
high strength reinforcement can be used for structures in seismic regions.
 
 
FY 14
 
 
 
qtr. 2
 
 
qtr. 3
 
 
 
 
 
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SPR 763

Mechanistic Design Data
 
Project Coordinator Norris Shippen
Research Agency: Auburn University
Principal Investigator: David H. Timm
Start Date for ODOT: July 8, 2014
Completion Date for ODOT: July 1, 2016
 
OVERVIEW
ODOT began implementation of Mechanistic design practices and principles starting in
approximately 2003. At the time, implementation was as a secondary evaluation tool in asphalt
concrete pavement design due to uncertainty in the design method precision, lack of ongoing
calibration, and lack of data. Three pavement sites were instrumented across Oregon between
2004 and 2008 to gather data to help in moving the implementation of mechanistic design
practices forward. Data from the sites was collected as part of a previous research project, but
was not completely summarized or analyzed and a large part of the data is currently providing no
useful benefit to ODOT. If these data are to be useful in ODOT’s ongoing mechanistic
pavement design calibration, the data from the instrumented sites needs to be reduced from its
current “raw” format and evaluated.
 
OBJECTIVES
The objective of this research is to reduce and manipulate existing data and to the extent possible
used it to calibrate and improve mechanistic design methods. Because the existing data have not
yet been assessed, the researchers will assess the data and determine whether the existing data
can be beneficial for improving design of pavements. 
 
FY 14
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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SPR 764

Road Map for Connected Vehicle/Cooperative Systems
 
Project Coordinator Myra Sperley
Research Agency: Portland State University
Principal Investigator: Robert Bertini
Start Date for ODOT: October 28, 2013
Completion Date for ODOT: June 30, 2015
 
OVERVIEW
The U.S. DOT plans to fund future pilot deployments of mobility and environmental related
applications in the coming years—likely including a set of regional pilots as well as smaller,
more self-contained projects focused on priority applications. As connected vehicle research
moves into deployment, state, local and transit agencies, metropolitan planning organizations and
the private sector will start feeling the effects of vehicles and infrastructure with dedicated, short-range wireless communications connectivity at their cores. Along with other states and regions,
ODOT can benefit from preliminary scoping, evaluation, and assessment of the impact of
connected vehicles and infrastructure and a wide range of potential cooperative system
applications. 
 
 
OBJECTIVES
The goal of this project is to lay the groundwork for Oregon to be prepared to lead in the
implementation of a connected vehicle/cooperative systems transportation portfolio, and/or to
avoid being caught by surprise as developments in this area evolve quickly. The project will
assess ODOT’ s current internal mechanisms for addressing connected vehicle/cooperative
systems, scan, review and assess technical maturity of potential connected vehicle/cooperative
system applications, develop preliminary goals, link to prospective connected
vehicle/cooperative systems applications, and refine/rank/prioritize those that fit with potential
ODOT role in advancing/leading these initiatives. identify opportunities for linking ODOT’s
current programs with national and international connected vehicle/cooperative system research,
testing and deployment initiative, and recommend a final shared vision and “road map” for
Oregon's priority connected vehicle/cooperative system applications. 
 
 
FY 14
FY 15 
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qtr. 2
 
 
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SPR 765

High Strength Steel Bars and Casing in Response to Drilled Shafts
 
Project Coordinator Matthew Mabey
Research Agency: Oregon State University
Principal Investigator: Armin Stuedlein
Start Date for ODOT: February 5, 2014
Completion Date for ODOT: February 15, 2017
 
OVERVIEW
Drilled shafts provide significant geotechnical resistance for support of highway bridges, and are
used throughout the State of Oregon to meet its structural foundation requirements. Due to
changes in construction methods and poor near-surface soils, the use of permanent steel casing
for drilled shaft installation has increased. However, geotechnical design models for axial and
lateral resistance of drilled shafts are largely based on soil-concrete interfaces, not soil-steel
interfaces associated with large diameter steel casing. Owing to the increased understanding of
our regional seismic hazards, the amount of steel reinforcement used in drilled shaft construction
has increased over the past several decades. This creates a new construction concern for
engineers: the increased steel area results in a reduced clearance between adjacent reinforcement
bars in the steel cage, such that concrete has an increased difficulty in penetrating the cage,
increasing the likelihood for voids and defects within the shaft, which can lead to poor structural
and geotechnical performance. The use of high-strength reinforcement steel can lead to
increased clearance within the steel cage, mitigating concreting issues. The use of steel casing
and the amount of steel area control the axial and lateral resistance of the shaft. Thus, existing
approaches need to be evaluated for modern construction methods, and new approaches
developed if necessary to ensure desired performance criteria are met.
 
OBJECTIVES
The objectives of this research are to study the impact of steel casing and high-strength steel
reinforcement on the axial and lateral behavior of full-scale drilled shaft foundation elements and
to evaluate the appropriateness of existing ODOT design procedures. If necessary, new
procedures incorporating the effect of steel casing and high-strength steel reinforcement will be
developed. If selected, the Association of Drilled Shaft Contractors (ADSC) and PacTrans will
contribute effort and funding to help accomplish these objectives. This project will also evaluate
shafts installed at the OSU geotechnical test site 17 years ago by a joint FHWA/ADSC research
venture such that interesting side-by-side geotechnical and structural aging effects can be
determined.  
 
 
FY 14
FY 15 
qtr. 1
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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SPR 766

Effective Measures to Restrict Turning Movements
 
Project Coordinator Mark Joerger
Research Agency: Texas A&M Transportation Institute
Principal Investigator: Karen Dixon
Start Date for ODOT: October 2013
Completion Date for ODOT: October 2014
 
OVERVIEW
In Oregon, a highway access right does not guarantee a full turn highway road approach. ODOT
has occasionally imposed a non-traversable median for an approach when deemed necessary to
restrict vehicle turn movements so as to ensure an approach operates safely under the
circumstances. Recent focus on supporting economic development has raised awareness of the
need for other effective ways to restrict vehicle turn movements with less impact on businesses
and freight movement.
 
This proposed effort will research and develop design guidelines or standards/targets for
effective measures to restrict vehicle turn movements at private approaches. The ODOT
Highway Design Manual, Chapter 9.0, provides general design standards for private road
approaches; however, it does not contain design guidelines or standards for measures intended to
restrict vehicle turn movements at approaches. ODOT needs performance-based information and
data on the efficacy of a range of measures used to restrict vehicle turn movements in order to
make objective decisions that are based on quantifiable information and provide options to help facilitate turning movements at these approach locations.
 
OBJECTIVES
The objective of this research is to support recent changes to ORS 374.312(10)(c) to determine
and provide guidance for effective measures to restrict vehicle turning movements. At the
conclusion of this research, ODOT will have a recommended list of alternative approach
treatments, other than just the use of a non-traversable median, for various prevailing traffic
conditions and guidelines for their selection and application in Oregon.
 
FY 14
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SPR 767

Design Treatments for Right Turns at Intersections with Bicycle Traffic
 
Project Coordinator Lyn Cornell
Research Agency: Oregon State University/Portland State University
Principal Investigator: David Hurwitz/Chris Monsere
Start Date for ODOT: September 10, 2013
Completion Date for ODOT: June 30, 2015
 
OVERVIEW
Most bicycle-motor vehicle crashes occur at intersections in urban areas—with crashes involving
right-turning vehicles and through bicycles (“the right-hook”) being the most common. In
Oregon, data from 2007-2010 indicate that of 3,163 bicycle-vehicle crashes 66% occur at
intersections and 35% of those can be typed as involving a right-turning vehicle and through
cyclist. While drivers must legally yield the right-of-way to cyclists in bicycle lanes, drivers
often fail to see cyclists or misjudge the gap of the approaching cyclist. In addition, cyclists do
not always position themselves to be readily seen or approach at high rates of speed. These
factors contribute to the occurrence of right-hook crashes.
 
A variety of passive and active traffic control measures and geometric designs have been
implemented. Treatments include pavement markings, static signs, bicycle-activated signs,
green bike lanes, contrasting pavement colors, tactile treatments, raised bike lanes, buffer space,
shared right-turn lanes, and cycle tracks. The intent of these design treatments is to improve the
awareness of the conflict point for both cyclists and drivers and ultimately improve safety. The
relative effect that each of these designs has on the failure modes is not readily known.
 
OBJECTIVES
The overall goal of the proposed research is to quantify the safety performance of alternative
traffic control strategies to mitigate right-turning vehicle-bicycle crashes at intersections in
Oregon. The performance will be quantified with objective data gathered from OSU’s driving &
bicycling simulator validated through field observation.
 
 
FY 14
FY 15 
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SPR 768

Crowdsourcing as a Data Collection Method for Bicycle Performance Measures
 
Project Coordinator Myra Sperley
Research Agency: Portland State University
Principal Investigator: Miguel Figliozzi
Start Date for ODOT: December 3, 2013
Completion Date for ODOT: May 30, 2015
 
OVERVIEW
Currently, ODOT does not have a system to collect bicycle and network usage information or a
method to locate areas with low connectivity or poor user experience. Given the inaccuracy, user
burden, and cost of traditional surveys (e.g. Oregon Household Activity Survey) along with the
rapid penetration of smartphones; there is great potential associated with the development of
smartphone applications to complement/reduce the cost of traditional data collection tools.
 
OBJECTIVES
This research will take advantage of recent smartphone technological advances and
crowdsourcing to gather bicycle route data and identify deficient segments/facilities. The key
objective is to design a cost-effective data collection method to feed ODOT’s growing active
transportation performance measures and investment prioritization needs.
 
 
FY 14
FY 15 
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