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Active Projects II

SPR 770

Impact of Cascadia Earthquake on Seismic Evaluation

 

Project Coordinator:
Matthew Mabey
Research Agency:
Portland State University
Principal Investigator:
Peter Dusicka
Start Date for ODOT:
December 16, 2013
Completion Date for ODOT:
September 30, 2016
 
OVERVIEW:
The seismic risk used for bridge design and retrofit is defined by hazard maps of ground
acceleration values. To generate the maps, an algorithm called a Probabilistic Seismic Hazard
Analysis (PSHA) is used to combine multiple regional sources of ground shaking. Each source
has a different intensity, probability of occurrence, and distance to a specific location. For
Oregon, one key source of ground shaking in the PSHA is from the Cascadia Subduction Zone
(CSZ); however, a CSZ earthquake can have significantly different ground motion as a
standalone event than what is captured in the values derived from the PSHA.
 
 
Impact of Cascadia Earthquake on Seismic Evaluation Criteria of Bridges Work Plan
 
 
 
 
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SPR 775

Titanium for Strengthening Existing Reinforced Concrete Bridges
 Project Coordinator:
 Matthew Mabey
 Research Agency:
 Oregon State University
 Principal Investigator:
 Chris Higgins
 Start Date at ODOT:
 July 1, 2014
 Completion Date for ODOT:
 September 30, 2016
 
 
Overview:
 
 
The research has three objectives to expand the use of titanium reinforcement:
• Develop a splicing method that allows supplemental reinforcing bars to be deployed along the full length of girders including through the intermediate diaphragms that protrude from most beams.
• Develop an unbonded strengthening detail that eliminates the need to cut grooves into the concrete surface, thereby reducing labor costs, epoxy material costs, and construction time.
• Develop methods to apply exterior titanium bars to strengthen girders with inadequate transverse reinforcement.
 
 
 
 
 
 

SPR 776

 Quantifying Noise Impacts from ODOT Aggregate Source Operations
 Project Coordinator:
 Kira Glover-Cutter
 Research Agency:
 SLR International Corporation
 Principal Investigator:
 Jessica Stark
 Start Date at ODOT:
August 21, 2015
 Completion Date for ODOT:
 June 30, 2016
 
Overview:
 The potential listing of the sage grouse as “endangered” by US Fish and Wildlife (expected in 2015) has the potential for significant impact to ODOT aggregate source operations.  Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODF&W) has issued a whitepaper in 2012 that provides interim guidance for mitigation for sage grouse habitat from activities associated with industrial-commercial developments.  Such developments include rock quarries.  The interim guidance provides requirements for decibel thresholds, use of propagation models with output binned in 5-decibel contours, and recommended mitigation.  It is unknown if activities from ODOT aggregate source sites comply with these very low noise thresholds. This uncertainty has potential impacts to development and delivery of projects in Regions 4 and 5 that depend heavily on material from ODOT quarries.  Data are needed to determine compliance with the decibel thresholds and identify potential mitigation.   There is also a great need to collect data for development of a methodology that can be applied throughout the state for determining noise impacts to sage grouse habitat and habitat for other noise sensitive species as well as other noise sensitive uses from rock quarries.
 
 
 
 
 
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SPR 777

Chip Seal Design and Specifications
 Project Coordinator:
 Jon Lazarus
 Research Agency:
 Iowa State University
 Principal Investigator:
 Douglas Gransberg/Chris Williams
 Start Date at ODOT:
 July 18, 2014
 Completion Date for ODOT:
 July 31, 2016
 
 
Overview:
 
The RFP defines the problem as a need to “revisit” ODOT’s chip seal design methodology and specifications using common chip seal design methodologies found elsewhere in the US and internationally as a benchmark to identify potential approaches to improve the ODOT chip seal program. The crux of the issue revolves around the upcoming loss of experienced maintenance personnel and the fact that the current ODOT “The technique used to apply chip seals is currently referred to as more of an ‘art’ than ‘science’ and is based on “an experienced person conducting a visual inspection during the application and making adjustments in binder and/or aggregate (chip) rate.” Therefore, ODOT requires a rational chip seal design methodology based on quantitative measurements that can be successfully replicated by contractors in the field and which does not demand the current amount of professional judgment to be successful.
 
 
 
 
 
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SPR 778

 Safety Effectiveness of Pedestrian Crossing Enhancements
 Project Coordinator:
Josh Roll
 Research Agency:
Portland State University
 Principal Investigator:
 Chris Monsere/Miguel Figliozzi
 Start Date at ODOT:
 September 18, 2014
 Completion Date for ODOT:
 September 30, 2016
 
 
Overview:
ODOT’s Tech Services Branch is implementing a pedestrian safety countermeasure program which will direct HSIP funding toward pedestrian safety counter measures (approximately $4 million has been set aside for both pedestrian and bicycle safety improvements). Data-driven safety decision-making–including implementation of the Highway Safety Manual–requires the development of crash modification factors (CMFs) for various roadway improvements. Over the last decade, the Oregon DOT has systematically implemented many pedestrian crossing enhancements (PCEs) across the state. The most commonly deployed treatments include continental crosswalk markings, pedestrian median islands, curb bulb outs, pedestrian activated flashing beacons and advanced stop bars. The existing literature on driver yielding clearly indicates that medians are a significant pedestrian safety feature and pedestrian-hybrid beacons improve driver stopping compliance (both of these are included in the FHWA countermeasures clearinghouse and have CMFs). Rectangular Rapid Flash Beacons (RRFB) also improve driver stopping compliance but the safety effects (CMFs) have not yet been quantified.
 
The objective of this research is to estimate the effectiveness of PCEs on multimodal safety in Oregon design contexts to derive CMFs calibrated to Oregon (i.e. not only pedestrian crashes but also motorized vehicles and bicycle crashes in the vicinity). This research will carefully consider the type of enhancement, the geometry, the surrounding land uses, and pedestrian/vehicle exposures. The results of this research will provide decision-makers with a valuable tool to guide future PCE deployments. The results of this research can also set the foundation for future cost/benefit analysis of PCEs.
 
 
 
 
 
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SPR 779

 Risk Factors for Pedestrian and Bicycle Crashes
 Project Coordinator:
 Mark Joerger
 Research Agency:
 Portland State University/Oregon State University
 Principal Investigator:
 Chris Monsere/Haizhong Wang
 Start Date at ODOT:
 November 10, 2014
 Completion Date for ODOT:
 August 31, 2016
 
Overview:
In Oregon, pedestrian and bicyclist fatalities comprise more than 15% of all traffic deaths and are of primary concern for many communities in Oregon (there were 56 bicycle and 247 pedestrian fatalities in the last five years). Oregon has identified pedestrian and bicycle crashes as a primary focus area for investing infrastructure funding and has marked approximately $4 million in the All Roads Safety Program to help address this key need. However, developing a plan for targeted investments is challenging because pedestrian and bicycle crashes are uncommon enough to make it difficult to predict where they will occur next. This random nature also makes it difficult to identify high crash locations and corridors.  As preliminary work towards this problem, ODOT TRS hired a consultant in Spring 2013 to prepare a plan to reduce bicycle and pedestrian crashes by focusing limited resources on locations that have the greatest potential for crash reductions.  The objectives of the plan were to match key effective safety systemic infrastructure countermeasures with potential locations for improvements by identifying a few key patterns of behavior and roadway conditions that cause the high risk locations. The results of the plan were presented and discussed with stakeholders from around Oregon.  The identification of risk factors and the magnitude of their influence on the likelihood of future crashes were significantly constrained by limited roadway information used in the analysis such as bicyclist and pedestrian volumes, the presence of a crossing treatment, presence of a turn lane, driveway activity, and sight distances.  To improve ODOT’s ability to target limited resources more certainty is needed about the most important risk factors.
 
 
 
 
 
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SPR 780

Strategies to Increase the Service Life of Existing Bridge Decks
 Project Coordinator:
 Matthew Mabey
 Research Agency:
 Oregon State University
 Principal Investigator:
 Burkan Isgar
 Start Date at ODOT:
 July 1, 2014
 Completion Date for ODOT:
 September 30, 2016
 
 
 
Overview:
The ultimate goal of the research is to provide ODOT with a protocol to assess bridge decks during its ongoing bridge deck treatment operations using practical and fast SR measurements and additional quantitative tools that are easy-to-use, intuitive and user-friendly. Using these tools ODOT inspection engineers will be able to (1) decide if chloride profiling is necessary, and if so, on which locations on the deck these measurements should be performed, (2) predict chloride profiles using SR measurements, environmental data, moisture content predictions, and salt exposure history, and (3) make time-to-damage predictions. To achieve this core objective a two-part research plan is developed. The plan involves concurrent experimental and modeling studies.
 
The core objective of experimental program is to correlate SR data from bridge decks with critical performance indicators such as chloride profiles, transport properties of concrete, as well as time-to-corrosion and time-to-damage predictions. The experimental study will focus on the impact of concrete type, reinforcement detailing, salt exposure, temperature and moisture variations, and freeze-thaw cycles on SR measurements over a period of ~18 months. A number of factors that are known to affect SR measurements, such as cracking and corrosion, are not part of the experimental program because these are currently studied under another project led by one of the PIs of the current work. The results of that ongoing study on the effect of cracking and corrosion on SR will be used in the current project.
 
The parallel modeling study will address the following challenges: (1) correction of SR measurements for environmental conditions and slab properties; (2) predicting chloride profiles in concrete using SR measurements, slab data, environmental data, and salt exposure history, and; (3) making corrosion risk and time-to damage predictions to guide the selection of bridge decks for pre-emptive corrosion mitigation procedures.
 
  
 
 
 
 
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SPR 781

Improving Adaptive/Responsive Signal Control Performance: Implications of Non-Invasive Detection and Legacy Timing Practices
 
 Project Coordinator:
 Jon Lazarus
 Research Agency:
 Northern Arizona University
 Principal Investigator:
 Edward Smaglik
 Start Date at ODOT:
 September 10, 2014
 Completion Date for ODOT:
 June 10, 2016
 
 
Overview:
ODOT is turning towards adaptive/responsive signal control strategies to improve the operational performance of coordinated corridors and networks. However, these newer control strategies require more information from the detection systems than more traditional control strategies. This requirement for higher resolution detection data could be addressed through the selection of in pavement detection; however, due to the capital costs associated with in-pavement detection systems ODOT is increasingly selecting non-invasive or passive detection systems such as video cameras, micro-wave, radar, or micro detection pucks, which are also easier to install and maintain. 
 
These non-invasive systems are currently performing below those standards established by the use of in-pavement detection. As such, ODOT is currently operating adaptive and responsive signal control by applying legacy timing and installation practices, and in doing so is not maximizing the benefits of its investment in advanced control strategies. The use of passive detection can degrade optimal intersection performance up to 20%, resulting in longer delays to the public, inefficient use of cycle time, increased traffic queuing, increased fuel consumption, increases risk of traffic crashes due to congestion and results in sub-optimal signal operations. 
 
Current ODOT standards of practice for purchase, installation, layout and timing of non-invasive systems requires updating.  More realistic costs, installation practices, detection zone layouts and timing parameters are needed in order to capture the full measure of the more powerful data driven traffic signal controller systems currently being deployed throughout the State of Oregon.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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SPR 782

HMAC Layer Adhesion Through Tack Coat

 Project Coordinator:
 Norris Shippen
 Research Agency:
 Oregon State University
 Principal Investigator:
 Erdem Coleri
 Start Date at ODOT:
 December 9, 2014
 Completion Date for ODOT:
 August 31, 2016

 

Overview:

Tack coats are the asphaltic emulsions applied between pavement lifts to provide adequate bond between the two surfaces. The adhesive bond between the two layers helps the pavement system to behave as a monolithic structure and improves the structural integrity. The absence, inadequacy or failure of this bond result in a significant reduction in the shear strength resistance of the pavement structure and makes the system more vulnerable to many distress types, such as cracking, rutting, and potholes (Tashman et al. 2006).  

 

Tracking, the pick-up of bituminous material by construction vehicle tires, reduces the amount of tack coat in certain areas and creates a non-uniform tack coat distribution between the two construction lifts. This non-uniform tack coat distribution creates localized failures around the low tack coat locations and reduces the overall structural integrity of the pavement structure. In addition, tack coat type, residual application rate, temperature, and existing surface condition (cracked, milled, new, old, or grooved) are the other factors that affect the tack coat performance. By considering all these factors, a quality-control and quality-assurance process need to be developed to maximize tack coat performance during the design life. Although Louisiana Tack Coat Quality Tester (LTCQT) (Mohammed et al. 2006) can be used to predict in-situ tack coat performance, high cost of LTCQT ($40,000) may restrict its widespread use in overlay construction projects in Oregon.

 

HMAC Layer Adhesion Through Tack Coat Work Plan

 

Latest Quarterly Report Link

 

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