Text Size:   A+ A- A   •   Text Only
Find     
Site Image

Active Projects II

SPR 769

Safe and Effective Speed Reductions for Freeway Work Zones Phase 2

 

Project Coordinator: ​Jon Lazarus
Research Agency: ​Oregon State University
Principal Investigator: ​John Gambatese
Start Date for ODOT: ​June 1, 2013
Completion Date for ODOT: ​February 28, 2015
 
OVERVIEW:
In response to requests from the Associated General Contractors (AGC) Oregon-Columbia
Chapter, ODOT began a research study in FY2013 (SPR-751) to look for ways to safely reduce
speeds through work zones on preservation projects taking place on high-speed freeways.
Freeway preservation projects typically require traffic lane reductions to allow workers to
rehabilitate worn pavements. During lane closures, work activities take place immediately
adjacent to live traffic – traffic that is often travelling at high speeds. ODOT is interested in
strategies to safely reduce these speeds and subsequently improve the overall safety of the work
zone for drivers and for workers.
Phase 1 of this study (SPR 751) included two paving projects, one on I-84 near The Dalles and
one on I-5 just north of the McKenzie River Bridge. On each project, different traffic control
measures (TCMs) were implemented and speed data was collected both prior to and within the
work zone.
 
OBJECTIVE:
The proposed research comprises augmenting the SPR-751 study to address the issues and needs
identified by the TAC. This proposal includes conducting two additional case study projects at a
reduced cost. The additional case studies will be on paving projects similar to SPR-751, and
include a reduced total number of treatments focused on the following specific traffic control
measures: “SPEED 50” signs, PCMS signs on a roller(s) or a stationary trailer(s), and radar
speed reader trailers. As with SPR-751, the overall goal of the proposed research is to assist
ODOT with enhancing the safety of work zones on high-speed roadways.
 
Safe and Effective Speed Reductions for Freeway Work Zones Phase 2 Work Plan

QUARTERLY REPORTS
FY 14 FY 15
​qtr. 2
 
Back to Top

SPR 770

Impact of Cascadia Earthquake on Seismic Evaluation

 

Project Coordinator: ​Steve Soltesz
Research Agency: ​Portland State University
Principal Investigator: ​Peter Dusicka
Start Date for ODOT: ​December 16, 2013
Completion Date for ODOT: ​March 31, 2016
 
OVERVIEW:
The seismic risk used for bridge design and retrofit is defined by hazard maps of ground
acceleration values. To generate the maps, an algorithm called a Probabilistic Seismic Hazard
Analysis (PSHA) is used to combine multiple regional sources of ground shaking. Each source
has a different intensity, probability of occurrence, and distance to a specific location. For
Oregon, one key source of ground shaking in the PSHA is from the Cascadia Subduction Zone
(CSZ); however, a CSZ earthquake can have significantly different ground motion as a
standalone event than what is captured in the values derived from the PSHA.
 
OBJECTIVE:
The objective of this project is to provide ODOT with the best rational estimate of ground
acceleration values for designing and retrofitting bridges.
 
Impact of Cascadia Earthquake on Seismic Evaluation Criteria of Bridges Work Plan
 

QUARTERLY REPORTS
FY 14 FY 15
 

 

Back to Top

SPR 771

Risk Factors Associated with High Potential for Serious Crashes

 

Project Coordinator: ​Mark Joerger
Research Agency: ​Montana State University
Principal Investigator: ​Ahmed Al-Kaisy/David Veneziano
Start Date for ODOT: ​November 21, 2013
Completion Date for ODOT:
 
OVERVIEW:
Crashes are random events and consequently, can occur at any location along the roadway. On
roadways with higher traffic volumes, the more frequent occurrence of crashes allows for the
direct identification of high crash locations using historical data. However, on local roads, crash
occurrence, particularly fatal and serious injury crashes, is less frequent. This makes it difficult
to identify trends and treat hazardous sites based on historical data. Geometric, traffic and other
features may lend themselves toward crashes potentially happening in spot locations. Therefore,
an approach to identifying these types of risk factors on low volume roads is necessary.
 
OBJECTIVE:
The proposed research will identify risk factors and features that contribute to crashes along low
volume roads and the cost effectiveness of countermeasures to address them. Research objectives
include:
Identify risk factors and features that contribute to crash occurrence and which can be corrected
by selected low cost countermeasures, with a specific focus on low and moderate volume roads
with sporadic crash occurrence.
Develop a risk index of different factors and features that practitioners should look for and that
can be addressed using selected low cost countermeasures along low and moderate volume
roads.
Establish the cost effectiveness/thresholds for the low cost countermeasures that are selected for
use in addressing risk factors on low to moderate volume roads.
Conduct limited case studies to demonstrate the use of the identified risk factors and application
of the cost effectiveness thresholds that are developed.
 
Risk Factors Associated with High Potential for Serious Crashes Work Plan

QUARTERLY REPORTS
FY 14 FY 15
​qtr. 3
 
Back to Top