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SPR 718

Mechanistic Design Guide Calibration for Pavement Rehabilitation
 
 

Project Coordinator: Jon Lazarus
Research Agency:  Iowa State University
Principal Investigator:  R. Christopher Williams
Start Date for ODOT: January 2010
Completion Date for ODOT:        January 2012
 
OBJECTIVES: 
The objective of the research is to provide ODOT with pavement performance models for HMAC overlays that predict fatigue cracking, rutting, and thermal cracking calibrated to Oregon conditions.  PCC pavements will also be examined for validating the national level models.
Benefits:
The MEPDG will enable designs to be more economical as well as have the potential to link pavement design with actual material characteristics, and construction processes.  Therefore savings to ODOT can be achieved by more economical pavement designs being developed that could represent savings as well as identify inadequate pavement designs from being constructed.  Furthermore, as newer technologies and materials are being developed, characterization of their material properties will expedite their design review,   thus resulting in use of the MEPDG.  Several examples exist including the use of warm mix asphalt, post consumer asphalt roofing shingles in HMAC, and the development of a non-petroleum asphalt binder.

 
OVERVIEW:  
The development of the MEPDG began in the late 1990s and its subsequent implementation has begun in the past few years by numerous owner/agencies across the US.  National Cooperative Highway Research Project (NCHRP) 1-40B, titled Recommended Practice for Local Calibration of the Mechanistic-Empirical Pavement Design Guide, has provided an excellent framework for calibrating the level 3 MEPDG for ODOT.  It is important to point out that level 2 calibration is dependent upon material and mixture characteristics.  Further the linkage of material and mixture characteristics to pavement performance is critical to the level 2 calibration.

 
PROPOSED ACTIVITIES:
The results of this research effort (i.e., calibrated performance models for HMAC overlays) will be utilized by the pavement design engineer and pavement specialists in Pavement Services for the design of HMAC overlays for pavement rehabilitation projects.  This will include cold mix over cold mix, full-depth HMAC, and HMAC over PCC.  PCC pavement performance is anticipated to be limited, however, the validation of the associated models will be done.  The outcomes of this research will be utilized by the pavement design engineer and pavement specialists in the Pavement Services for the design of HMAC and pavement rehabilitation projects.
 
MECHANISTIC DESIGN GUIDE CALIBRATION FOR PAVEMENT REHABILITATION WORK PLAN 


 
Quarterly Reports:



 FY 10
 FY 11
FY 12
 
 
qtr. 4

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SPR 719

Climate Change Impact on Coastal River Estuaries in Oregon

Project Coordinator: Matthew Mabey
Research Agency:  ODOT Research
Principal Investigator:  Matthew Mabey
Start Date for ODOT: June 2010
Completion Date for ODOT:        June 2020
 
OBJECTIVES: 
It is proposed that ODOT monitor the physical processes and the roadway features of the Salmon River Estuary to better understand the effects of changes to ODOT’s facilities and various restoration efforts as well as sea level rise and climate change.  The proposed data will targeted to form the foundation for ODOT’s efforts to maintain the function of the coastal roadway system and to fulfill our obligation as environmental stewards.  The Salmon River Estuary has been selected from the many estuaries crossed by ODOT highways because of the existence of  past monitoring and changes that are already planned for the highway.
The Objective of this research is to improve our understanding of the interactions of ODOT’s facilities with estuary system.  Specifically the intent is to gather data to verify that changes in ODOT’s facilities and in the estuary produce the expected results or give new understanding to what really happened.
 
By monitoring conditions and changes in the Salmon River Estuary a better understanding will be gained of how the roadway/estuary system functions and how it responds to changes of all kinds (restoration, climate, sea level, construction).  With this understanding ODOT will be better able to protect, maintain, improve, and construct these roadways.  Our ability to do this while protecting the environment and enhancing ecosystem function will also be improved.  Agriculture in the estuaries will benefit as well.  In general ODOT will be able to make more informed responses to current and future changes to fulfill our agency mission. 

 
OVERVIEW:  
U.S. Route 101 and other ODOT highways traverse numerous estuaries along Oregon’s coast.  These roadways affect, and in turn are affected by, changes in the function of the estuary caused by both the presence of the roadway as well as changes in sea level.  Likewise, future climatic changes may also affect the function of both the roadways and the estuaries.  A great deal of money and effort continues to be focused on restoring estuaries to their more natural function.  To validate present methods, develop improved future methods, and to adapt to changing future conditions it is important to monitor conditions in the estuaries and along the roadways. 

 
PROPOSED ACTIVITIES:
The main focus of the monitoring proposed for this research project is the hydrology of the estuary around the highway.  Conceptually this project will monitor flow and stage at a number of locations influenced by and influencing the highway and related structures.  Additional physical parameters such as water temperature and water salinity will also be monitored at those sites.  Settlement, aggradation, degradation, channel migration and avulsion are also intertwined with the hydrology.  Therefore elevation profiles will be taken in and around the highway and monitoring sites to track changes due to those phenomena.  The water table will also be monitored at some locations.
 
It is proposed that monitoring be initially funded for 10 years.  The budget includes some replacement and rehabilitation of equipment over the course of the project.  The duration of monitoring can be easily extended or shortened as determined by circumstances. 



 
Quarterly Reports:



 FY 10
 FY 11
FY 12
FY 13 ​FY 14
 
qtr. 1 qtr. 1
 
qtr. 2 qtr. 2​
 
qtr. 3 qtr. 3​
qtr. 4 ​qtr. 4

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SPR 728

Shrinkage Limits and Testing Protocols for High Performance
 
 

Project Coordinator: Steve Soltesz
Research Agency:  Oregon State University
Principal Investigator:  Jason Ideker
Start Date for ODOT: October 2010
Completion Date for ODOT:        June 2013
 
OBJECTIVES: 
The research goals are to 1) provide shrinkage threshold limits for ODOT Materials Specifications and 2) provide a robust test procedure (or set of procedures) so that materials suppliers can easily determine compliance with specified threshold limits.
 
OVERVIEW:  
ODOT has observed varying degrees of cracking in concrete structures. Cracking of high performance reinforced concrete structures, in particular bridge decks, is of paramount concern to ODOT. Cracking at early ages (especially within the first year after placement) results in additional costs and a significant maintenance burden to ODOT. These added costs could be avoided through improved testing techniques, improved material specifications, and improved construction requirements related to reducing cracking risks in such structures. The most significant challenge to overcoming cracking risk is to reduce the shrinkage, and ultimately the stresses generated as a result of such shrinkage, in concrete mixtures. Without a commonly agreed upon testing method and subsequent shrinkage threshold limits, it is essentially impossible for ODOT, under current guidelines, to specify and receive crack-free concrete with a high degree of confidence.
 
The literature along with several state DOTs and materials suppliers purport shrinkage limits, but these values vary widely.  From the testing perspective, several well-established relatively simple tests exist for assessing shrinkage and/or cracking risk of concrete mixtures (e.g. ASTM C 157 and ASTM C 1581); however, each of these tests has deficiencies that do not allow complete characterization of concrete shrinkage.  Research in the past 10 years has developed laboratory-based analytical tools such as rigid cracking frames that enable researchers to more accurately quantify concrete behavior.  Additionally, powerful computer models such as ConcreteWorks (a free program) provide further guidance for minimizing cracking risk in HPC.  A development effort that draws on the existing understanding of concrete shrinkage and the tools available for measuring cracking potential would be able to define appropriate shrinkage threshold limits and a test procedure for Oregon’s concrete bridge decks.


 
PROPOSED ACTIVITIES:
Task 1:  Literature Review.  Perform literature review with a particular focus on other DOTs and industry that have shown advanced procedures for dealing with concrete bridge deck cracking (Kansas DOT, Texas DOT, Illinois DOT). This review will also focus on identifying the best testing method(s) for shrinkage evaluation in concrete materials.
 
Task 2:  Evaluation Plan.  Develop the experimental plan based on statistical methods for conducting shrinkage tests and analyzing the results.  The evaluation will consider shrinkage test correlation with a baseline measure of cracking potential (rigid cracking frame), sensitivity, and repeatability over a range of Oregon bridge deck concrete mixes. .   
 
Task 3:  Laboratory Evaluation. 
 
Task 3a:  Determine shrinkage values of a range of concrete used in Oregon bridge decks based on standard testing methods (e.g. ASTM C 157, 1581 and 1698).  It is anticipated that these test methods will require at least some modification to more accurately predict cracking potential of field concrete.  Other test methods also may be investigated as deemed necessary by the research team and the TAC.
 
Task 3b:  Once shrinkage values are established, a subset of concrete mixtures from Task 3a will
be tested using rigid cracking frames.  The rigid cracking frame provides the best laboratory predictor of how concrete will behave in the field.   
 
Task 3c:  The results of Tasks 3a and 3b will be evaluated using the statistical analysis plan from Task 2. Shrinkage threshold criteria will be established based on the outcome of the analysis and information from the Task 1 literature review. 
 
Task 4: Testing Method Determination.  Based on the results from Task 3, a testing procedure for evaluating shrinkage across a wide range of concrete mixture designs for Oregon bridge decks will be defined.  Ease of use and cost will be important considerations in addition to test capabilities and limitations.  A round-robin evaluation of the test procedure will be conducted among Oregon concrete materials suppliers and contractors as a final check on the efficacy and practicality of the test method. 
 
Task 5:  Reporting and Implementation.  A final report documenting all findings from the research project as well as methodologies for technology transfer will be prepared.  Presentations will be made to ODOT, suppliers, and contractors to explain the research outcomes and to provide training.
 
SHRINKAGE LIMITS AND TESTING PROTOCOLS FOR ODOT HIGH PERFORMANCE CONCRETE WORK PLAN  


 
Quarterly Reports:


 FY 11
 FY 12
FY 13 FY 14
 
qtr. 1 qtr. 1​
qtr. 2
 qtr. 3 
qtr. 3
qtr. 4 qtr. 4

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SPR 729

Criteria For the Selection and Application of Advanced Traffic Signal Systems
 

Project Coordinator: June Ross
Research Agency:  University of Washington
Principal Investigator:  Yinhai Wang
Start Date for ODOT: January 2011
Completion Date for ODOT:        June 2011
 
OBJECTIVES: 
The final objectives of this research project (including both Phases I and II) are as follows:
  • To understand the state of current practices in advanced traffic signal system applications.
  • To develop criteria for the selection and application of advanced traffic signal systems.
  • To make recommendations regarding how the criteria developed should be incorporated into policies, guidance manuals, and training materials as well as specifications and standard drawings.
  • To set up measures to evaluate effectiveness of advanced traffic signal system
This Phase I study will focus on the first two objectives.

 
OVERVIEW:  
Recently ODOT and major cities in Oregon have begun upgrading traffic controllers at signalized intersections.  Model 170 controllers have limited memory and slow processing speeds which limit their functionality.  Model 2070 controllers are now required on new construction and are being installed at some locations such as high-volume actuated-coordinated arterial signal systems where the additional functionality of the controller offers the option of traffic responsive and adaptive traffic signal systems.  These systems offer advantages over pre-timed and actuated systems and lead to improved traffic flow, reduced congestion and delay, and increased safety through reduced rear end crashes. 
 
The ODOT Innovation Grant Program includes four projects that are implementing different types of advanced traffic signal systems.  These projects are anticipated to provide benefits to the transportation system, either through reductions in travel time, number of stops, vehicle and person delay, and vehicle emissions. In addition, the safety benefits of effectively coordinated signals systems are well documented. While each project includes an evaluation component, a comprehensive review of the implementation requirements and results has not been funded.  The investment in Model 2070 controllers, required vehicle detection enhancements, software, and trained staff to operate and maintain an upgraded system is significant and must be made carefully.
 
The challenge facing ODOT and local agencies is a lack of criteria and guidance in determining the most appropriate traffic signal systems to match the prevailing or expected roadway conditions. The issue is further complicated by the number of vendors and emerging technologies whose appropriateness of application and true cost to benefit ratio is not well understood. Guidance is needed to help determine the most cost effective traffic signal system solution(s), particularly as ITS solutions are stressed as alternative treatments to traditional capacity enhancement projects.


 
IMPLEMENTATION:
The deliverables of this Phase I research include a summary of the literature review, survey report, performance analysis report on the recently implemented systems including the planned Mission Street Voyage Test Corridor.  The applicability of work being accomplished through the FHWA funded project, Model Systems Engineering Documents for Traffic Signal System Control Alternatives, to Oregon will be identified.  Phase II will be dependent on results of Phase I and the continued need for research on this topic.  The Phase 1 report will include a description of what should be included in Phase II.  A work plan will not be developed until it is determined that a second phase is needed.
 
CRITERIA FOR THE SELECTION AND APPLICATION OF ADVANCED TRAFFIC SIGNAL SYSTEMS: PHASE I WORK PLAN


 
Quarterly Reports:




 FY 11
 FY 12
FY 13
 
qtr. 1
 
qtr. 2
​qtr. 3
 qtr. 4 

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Pooled Fund Project Gusset Plate

Imaging Tools for Evaluation of Gusset Plate Connections in Steel Truss Bridges

Project Coordinator: Steve Soltesz
Research Agency:  Oregon State University
Principal Investigator:  Christopher Higgins
Start Date for ODOT:
Completion Date for ODOT:       
 
IMAGING TOOLS FOR EVALUATION OF GUSSET PLATE CONNECTIONS IN STEEL TRUSS BRIDGES WORK PLAN 
 
MORE PROJECT DETAILS 

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