Programs

Jordan Cove Energy Project L.P. proposes to construct a liquefied natural gas export facility on 500 acres of the North Spit of the Coos River, near North Bend. The facility would have the capacity to export up to six million metric tons of liquefied natural gas per year. Veresen, the parent company and applicant, also proposes to build a natural gas pipeline called the Pacific Connector between the Jordan Cove facility and Malin in Klamath County. The 235-mile, 36-inch diameter pipeline’s capacity would be up to one billion cubic feet of natural gas per day.
 
Other elements of the project include construction of a marine terminal, widening of the navigation channel at four turns, a regional emergency response center, temporary workforce housing, and road and highway improvements. Roughly 100 acres is set aside to offset habitat impacted by the project at the former Kentuck golf course in Coos County.
 
As proposed, the liquefied natural gas facility would begin operating in 2024. DEQ must evaluate the proposed project to ensure it complies with state and federal environmental laws during and after construction.
 

Latest updates

October 2017

Jordan Cove submitted a Joint Permit Application to the U.S. Corps of Engineers, and DEQ that describes potential environmental impacts associated with the project including dredging, filling in wetlands, excavating, drilling and stabilizing soil to prevent ground movement during earthquakes, and managing post construction stormwater runoff.
The Corps and DEQ will hold a 60-day public comment period on the application once the Corps deems the application complete.
 
More information on DEQ’s role in the removal/fill process, known officially as a 401 Water Quality Certification, is in the permits section below.
 
DEQ has received air contaminant discharge permit applications for the Jordan Cove liquefied natural gas facility on the North Spit in Coos County, and for the Pacific Connector compressor station near Malin in Klamath County.
 

Permits

DEQ expects to receive a number of additional permit applications from Jordan Cove in the next year or two that will involve various aspects of the project from construction to wastewater management, and landfill closures on the North Spit of Coos Bay. As part of the permit review process, DEQ will hold public comment periods and in many cases informational meetings and public hearings.

The status of those permit applications is below. Check this page for regular updates throughout the permit review process.
 

Received/pending permit applications

Under the 401 certification process, DEQ begins reviewing a proposed project once the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers publishes its public notice. The 401 Water Quality Certification program reviews and evaluates water quality impacts of projects which require a federal permit or license to conduct any activity that may result in a discharge (including dredge and fill material) in waters of the United States under Section 401 of the Clean Water Act.

Project’s activities that have potential water quality impacts include those associated with dredging, filling in wetlands, excavating, drilling, stabilizing site soil to prevent ground movement during earthquakes, and managing post construction stormwater runoff.

The development of a project’s 401 Water Quality Certification involves the following steps:

  • Once the Corps deems complete the Joint Permit Application for the proposed liquid natural gas and pipeline projects the Corps and DEQ will hold a 60-day public comment period.
  • DEQ will review the project application and assess potential effects to water quality
  • DEQ will draft an evaluation and findings report and decide whether to draft a 401 Water Quality Certification or deny the certification.
  • DEQ will hold a separate 60-day public comment period on its proposed determination (whether to draft or deny certification).
  • DEQ’s will hold public meetings and public hearings at multiple locations during the public comment period.
  • DEQ will evaluate and respond to public comments and make a final determination.

The Air Quality Program received an air contaminant discharge permit applications for the Jordan Cove liquefied natural gas facility and an air contaminant discharge permit modification application for the Pacific Connector pipeline compressor station. DEQ will review the application materials and begin drafting permits.

When DEQ finishes drafting a permit for the liquefied natural gas facility and a permit modification for the compressor station, DEQ will hold separate public comment periods and hearings. The air quality liquefied natural gas facility public hearing will be held in Coos Bay and the air quality compression station public hearing will be held in Malin.

Below is a list of other permits that have been identified for the project, but which DEQ has not yet received applications on:

  • Water Quality permits for stormwater management during construction of the Jordan Cove liquefied natural gas facilities on the North Spit, the Kentuck mitigation site in Coos County and the Pacific Connector pipeline from Malin to the terminal on the North Spit
  • Water Quality permits for managing wastewater and other process water for the Jordan Cove liquefied natural gas facilities on the North Spit, and the Pacific Connector pipeline from Malin to the terminal on the North Spit
  • Operational and closure plans for Jordan Cove’s landfill permit on the North Spit of Coos Bay
 

Environmental Impact Statement

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is drafting an Environmental Impact Statement that evaluates the potential environmental effects of the federal project. DEQ will provide comments on the draft Environmental Impact Statement. DEQ will post links to the draft and final Environmental Impact Statements when they become available.
 

Project elements

The proposed terminal would receive natural gas via the pipeline. At the terminal, natural gas would be super-cooled into a liquid and transferred to vessels for export. Roughly 110 to 120 vessels would use the terminal each year.

The proposed export facility includes a new marine slip to accommodate ocean-going vessels. The marine slip would be excavated on 120 acres adjacent to the Coos Bay to create about 30 acres of new marine moorage. The marine slip would be dredged and maintained to a depth of 45 feet and would displace about 4.3 million cubic yards of dredged material. An additional 1.3 million cubic yards of material would be dredged to create an access channel connecting the marine slip with the federally maintained navigation channel. Jordan Cove will place the dredged material at four proposed locations: the Weyerhaeuser Linerboard Mill site, the liquefied natural gas terminal site, the Kentuck golf course mitigation site, and the North Point site in North Bend.

The proposed Pacific Connector Gas Pipeline Project is designed to transport up to one billion cubic feet of natural gas per day from Malin to the Jordan Cove LNG terminal, where the natural gas will be liquefied for export to international markets. The pipeline would affect about 400 bodies of water in the Coos, Coquille, South Umpqua, Upper Rogue, Upper Klamath and Lost River watersheds. The pipeline would cross beneath four major rivers (Coos, Umpqua, Rogue and Klamath) and would cross 1.58 miles of wetlands and 2.45 miles of water bodies.

Housing, sanitary services, and amenities for 2,000 temporary construction workers are proposed for development during construction of the liquefied natural gas project. The housing is proposed on the North Spit at the former Weyerhaeuser mill site.

The Southwest Oregon Regional Safety Center, a multi-agency emergency response and training center, would be on the North Spit at the former Weyerhaeuser mill site.

​Contacts

For more information about DEQ's role in the proposed Jordan Cove Energy Project, call Mary Camarata, Project Coordinator, at 541-687-7435.
 
Members of the media should contact Katherine Benenati at 541-686-7997.