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The Fiscal and Operations Division is tasked with overseeing the setting of budget priorities and their implementation. Consistent with legislative discussions during the 2015 - 17 budget process, OHA has reorganized its programmatic structure to further integrate physical health, behavioral health, and oral health, as well as streamline health transformation activities. Due to the timing of the reorganization, the 2015 - 17 budget was adopted reflecting the old organizational model. The rebalance plan effectuates the budgetary changes necessary to align the budget structure with the organizational structure. Inclusive of transfers to OHA from the Department of Human Services, these changes are budget neutral and result in a net FTE increase of 9.25 and reduction of two positions.

The following are the key organizational changes reflected in the rebalance plan:

  • A position true-up represents an extensive departmental review of positions vis-à-vis healthcare transformation needs, Affordable Care Act implementation, and clean-up of legacy issues and of permanent staff not having position authority. The rebalance responds to this by establishing 48 permanent positions for staff who have been double-filled long-term.
  • Review of limited-duration (LD) status employees and establishing 48 full-time positions where LD status for key positions had been previously utilized. This includes addressing the staffing needs in the Office of Equity and Inclusion as required by a budget note in Senate Bill 5526 (2015).
  • Medical Assistance Programs and Addictions and Mental Health are now integrated in the new Health Systems Division.
  • Oregon State Hospital now has its own budget structure.
  • Health Licensing Office is now included in Public Health.
  • Office of Equity and Inclusion (OEI) moved from Health Policy and Analytics to Central Services but continues to operate as a functional division.

Reprinted from: Agency Report Item 10: Oregon Health Authority Rebalance Report, January 15, 2016.



Mark Fairbanks  

Mark Fairbanks

Mark Fairbanks is the chief financial officer and chief operating officer for the Oregon Health Authority. Prior to joining OHA in May of 2015, Mark worked with the St. Charles Health System in Bend and United Healthcare in Portland. He also worked with Western Reliance Corporation, Northwest Natural Gas and LiveBridge, Inc. Mark has served on the boards of J Bar J Youth Services in Bend, and Metropolitan Family Service and Christie Care in Portland. He earned his MBA at the University of Oregon and is a licensed CPA.

Budget Q & A

Recent budget questions

Q & A reprinted from: OHA Stakeholder Meeting Synopsis, Sept. 15th, 2016

The proposed OHA budget will grow by 1 percent, or $228 million, from the previous biennium to account for inflation (as set by the state), phase-ins from previous legislative sessions, a reduction in federal funds for the expanded Medicaid program, changes in the Medicaid caseload, and changes in revenue streams.

The General Fund is expected to see a 48 percent growth, or about $1 billion, due to a reduction in federal match funds for the ACA (down to 95 percent in 2017 and continuing down every January until it reaches 90 percent in 2020), decline in Title 19 non-ACA match rate due to economic improvement, a decrease in tobacco tax revenue, phase-ins and phase-outs, inflation and other cost increases, caseload changes, the expiration of one time funds, and technical adjustments.


It represents a more accurate forecast. The forecasts are done by trend lines, and due to data issues, the original forecasts were too high.

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It will ultimately go down to a 90 percent federal match rate.​

It's reflective of things going both ways; we are seeing some ACA folks shifting into a lower FPL as well as people moving up. We can get back to you with more specific numbers.​

The traditional Medicaid reimbursement rate will stay at 65 percent. Right now, we're being reimbursed at 100 percent for the expanded Medicaid population, which will decrease to 90 percent by 2020. It is important to note, since these are trends we're watching, that the traditional Medicaid population is growing.​

We're doing some research on that, both in-house and through monthly meetings with DCBS. Although we don't have a hard number of where our state should be, we're looking at other states' experiences (like Washington, where 30 percent of the population is on Medicaid) as well as contributing factors. We keep thinking, and hoping, that it should be just under a million. We will be implementing fraud systems in 2017 to help with this.​

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