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  • Updated Oregon Solar Electric Guide now available!

    An updated version of the popular Oregon Solar Electric Guide is now available online. The new guide contains more than 100 changes from the previous version that was published in 2011. The electronic version can be found here. To get printed copies of the publication, please call the Oregon Department of Energy at 503-378-4040, or toll-free at 1-800-221-8035.

  • Can your water system produce an income stream?
    Small, low-impact hydropower has a place in Oregon's renewable energy portfolio. Driven by new technologies and low-impact designs, Oregon is building the next generation of hydroelectric projects in municipal water systems, irrigation canals and backyards. Learn the technical basics, find resources and discover innovative power systems by clicking on this link: Small, Low-Impact Hydropower
  • Six wood energy cluster grants awarded in central, eastern Oregon

    The Oregon Department of Energy and the U.S. Forest Service recently awarded six grants to communities east of the Cascades to help spur the development of small wood energy projects. The grants – totaling $168,000 – are part of the Wood Energy Cluster Pilot Project launched last year. The grants are for feasibility studies, financial analysis and other project development activities. For more information, please go here.
  • Renewable Thermal Energy 101
    Biomass pellets
    About a third of the energy we consume is used for thermal purposes. Thermal energy is energy we use for heating and cooling buildings, as well as powering certain industrial processes. The majority of this energy comes from fossil fuels, but there is a growing opportunity to utilize this energy more efficiently and generate it using local energy resources such as biomass, geothermal, and solar.
    For more information, please go here.
  • Creating energy from biomass
    Ponderosa pines, Deschutes County
    Using biomass to produce energy has been used for hundreds of years to meet humans' energy needs. We are finding new and more efficient ways of creating and using bioenergy. While wood is the most plentiful sources of biomass, many other types of biomass can be used to produce energy and fuel. To learn more, click on the red text below.
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