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Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

Question
What are the best practices for hiring a Professional Engineer, Professional Land surveyor, Registered Photogrammetrist, or Certified Water Right Expert?
Answer
We recommend that you look up their license​ and make sure that their status is "active".  This ensures that they are registered in the state of Oregon and have kept up on their continuing education requirements.
Question
How do I file a complaint against a Professional Engineer, Professional Land Surveyor, Registered Photogrammetrist, or Certified Water Right Expert?
Answer
Question
How do I find out about possible disciplinary actions taken by the Board?
Answer

Visite this page to see most recent disciplinary actions taken by the Board or contact the OSBEELS office (phone: 503-362-2666 email:osbeels@osbeels.org​) to inquire about possible disciplinary actions.


Right of Entry


Question
Can a Professional Land Surveyor access my private property without my permission?
Answer
Oregon Revised Statute (ORS) 672.047, also known as the right of entry law, regulates the access land surveyors have to private property. Last updated in 2011, the right of entry law requires surveyors to pay for property damage caused during the course of surveying, provide landowners with copies of the survey, and provide notice of entry to both landowners and property occupants. A registered professional land surveyor, or any employee or agent of the land surveyor, may not enter upon land for the purpose of surveying, performing other survey work or establishing a permanent survey monument without first providing notice to the landowner by first class mail or by personal notice. If the land is occupied by a person other than the landowner, notice must also be given to the occupant by first class mail or by personal notice. Notice that is given by first class mail must be mailed at least seven days prior to the entry onto the land. Notice that is given by personal notice must be hand-delivered to the landowner or occupant or be posted in a conspicuous place where the landowner or occupant may reasonably be expected to see the notice. The notice shall give the professional land surveyor’s name, address, telephone number, purpose, availability of the survey and the presence of any temporary or permanent monuments or other markers to be left on the land.
Question
What are the best practices for providing adequate Right-of-Entry notification?
Answer
​​Pursuant to Oregon Revised Statute (ORS) 672.047, a registered professional land surveyor, or any employee or agent of the land surveyor, is permitted to enter onto a landowner’s property , but is required to first provide timely notice to the landowner via first class mail or by personal notice. Notice that is given by first class mail must be mailed at least seven days prior to the entry onto the land. Notice that is provided in-person must be hand-delivered to the landowner or occupant or be posted in a visible place where the landowner or occupant would be expected to see the notice. Below are some best practices to remember when providing Right-of-Entry notification.
  • Make sure to provide all the required information on the notice. This includes; the professional land surveyor’s name, address, telephone number, purpose of survey work, availability of the survey and the presence of any temporary or permanent monuments or other markers to be left on the land.
  • Providing your notice verbally, rather than in writing, is not an adequate substitute or means for meeting the statute’s requirements.
  • Keep records of all notices provided and any responses received from land owners or occupants.
  • Remind surveying crews or associated employees that their actions and comments provided to land owners, and occupants, is a representation of you as a professional registrant. Any misinformation provided to members of the public by you, or your crew who is under your supervision and control, could potentially be a violation of professional conduct.
For more information on this topic, please review an article published by Board on Right-of-Entry in a recent issue of the The Oregon Examiner here.





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