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Scenic Byways Program

Oregon Scenic Byways Driving Guide cover

Oregon's roads Oregon's roads showcase the state's grandeur. The ability to access Oregon's diverse natural beauty, as well as historical and cultural sites has earned it 29 designated Scenic Byways and Tour Routes. On some byways, you'll drive from high desert to snowcapped peaks to verdant valleys in one go. You'll experience breathtaking views of Hells Canyon, Crater Lake, the Columbia River Gorge and the Pacific coastline. Oregon has four route designation categories – All-American Roads, National Scenic Byways and Tour Routes – which comprise the most beautiful scenery in Oregon.

If you're on the go, request a printed copy of the Oregon Scenic Byways Driving Guide. This guide highlights the unique viewpoints and attractions along the scenic routes, including maps outlining the must-see stops along each byway and details like mileage, drive times, best travel seasons and other helpful information for planning your trip. For an interactive online experience, visit Travel Oregon's website for scenic byway itineraries and more.

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Tour Oregon's Newest Scenic Byways

Corridor Management Plans

Scenic Byways are maintained by Corridor Management Plans. In an effort to meet transparency and accessibility goals, Corridor Management Plans of existing Oregon Scenic Byways will be available in this section.


Scenic Byway Signs and Logos

The following documents give direction for the design and use of Scenic Byway Signs and Logos:

Please note: The following logos and signs are provided for reference only. Do not use these images without prior permission from Marie Kennedy, ODOT Sign Engineer.


Frequently Asked Questions

​The Oregon Scenic Byways Program assists in the designation, protection, and promotion of Oregon's scenic byways.  Oregon's program pre-dates the federal Scenic Byways program, with concern for enhancing Oregon's natural beauty apparent dating back to 1913 with the formalization of a state highway system.  In 1961, Oregon created a seven-member Scenic Area Board and in 1983 and 1985, the Oregon Legislature directed the study of historic elements of the State highway system and the protection of scenic and historical corridors.  Oregon continually prioritizes maintaining and preserving scenic byways for the enjoyment of future generations.  Read ORS 377.100 and ORS 377.105 for the legal definition and parameters of Scenic Byways in Oregon.  For further information about the program nationally, please click here to visit the National Scenic Byway Foundation website.​

​A mix of local, regional, and statewide proponents manage the Scenic Byways Program.  The United States Forest Service, Oregon Department of Transportation, and Travel Oregon are a few of the statewide proponents, while many local visitors associations and chambers of commerce participate at individual locations.  For a full list of proponents, please click here.​

​Scenic Byways preserve and enhance the natural, scenic, historical, cultural, recreational, and/or archaeological qualities of Oregon's most unique byways.  The byways, in turn, provide a pleasurable attraction for in-state and out-of-state travelers, generating millions in local tourism dollars each year.  Byways may also include points of interest or excursion opportunities such as museums, hiking trails, and other activities that encourage exploration and support tourism industries.​

​There are 29 designated Scenic Byways and Tour Routes.  Four byways are federally classified All-American Roads which means they possess features that do not exist elsewhere in the United States and are unique and important enough to be tourist destinations unto themselves.  Six byways are National Scenic Byways and nine are Oregon State Scenic Byways.  The remaining ten are Oregon Tour Routes.  For a full description of Oregon's Scenic Byways, look through the Oregon Scenic Byways Official Driving Guide or request a printed copy.​

​Scenic Byways, which can be designated as an All-American Road, National, or State Scenic Byway, contain examples of truly spectacular routes with national or statewide significance.  They must be a minimum of 30 miles in length, be paved, and meet certain road and safety standards.

Tour Routes encompass regionally or locally known scenic, cultural, or historic values which also have features or points of interest that draw people out of their vehicles.  Tour Routes must be a minimum of 20 miles in length but may have primitive routes requiring high-clearance vehicles.​

​Oregon Scenic Byways are marked with specific signs at the beginning and end of each route.  Depending on the length of the route, there may be one or more signs along the route.  For more information regarding the location of routes or to plan your own excursion, please look through the Oregon Scenic Byways Official Driving Guide or request a printed copy.​

​Designating a new Oregon Scenic Byway required local and statewide support.  The Oregon Transportation Commission and the Oregon Economic Development Tourism Council were responsible for designating or removing scenic byways based on the recommendation of the Oregon Scenic Byway Committee.  

Along with the historical/cultural significance of the route, a logistically important consideration was the effect a designation would have on local tourism and economic development.  

Applicants engaged local residents early on and built a coalition including agencies in charge of maintaining the road, corridor property owners, representatives of other major interests in the corridor such as tribal councils or state parks departments, and local tourism promotion groups. 

​In order to maintain the caliber of existing Scenic Byways, the program is going dormant until future federal funding exists to support the expansion of the program.  During this time, no new designations will be accepted nor there a dedicated Scenic Byway Program Manager at ODOT.  Instead, ODOT program management will be reduced to general support across several parts of the Agency.​




Program Dormancy FAQ and Contacts

​In order to maintain the caliber of existing Scenic Byways, the program is going dormant until future federal funding exists to support the expansion of the program. 

During this time, no new designations will be accepted nor there a dedicated Scenic Byway Program Manager at ODOT.  Instead, ODOT program management will be reduced to general support across several parts of the Agency.  

​With limited state dollars and no more dedicated federal funding for Byways, the program will remain dormant until future federal funding exists to support the program.​

The Scenic Byway signs delineating the byway corridors are one of the most important features of the Oregon Scenic Byways. ODOT district maintenance may have funding for the replacement costs of the signs. This includes the cost of producing a new sign, the staff time to replace the sign, and in some cases the replacement of the posts.  If and when possible, the byway proponent may have resources to assist with replacement costs. Regarding funding, ORS 377.105(7) gives ODOT the authority to seek and accept funds for the purposes of implementing Scenic Byways, both public and private.

For general sign inquiries such as sign replacement or new sign requests, please contact Marie Kennedy, ODOT Sign Engineer.

For new tourism signs, please visit the Oregon Travel Information Council's website.​

​Please email Mo Sherifdeen with Travel Oregon​

For all other questions not specifically addressed, please contact Ask ODOT through the online portal, by phone at 1-888-275-6368 or via the Ask ODOT email​



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