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Resources for Consumers

This page compiles links to documents and sites that may be useful to funeral consumers and other members of the public. 
In addition to these links, you may be also be interested in searching for a licensee, reviewing a licensee's prior discipine, or filing a complaint.


This guide provides a brief overview of the death care industry in Oregon, as well as the duties of the Oregon Mortuary and Cemetery Board. This document is also available in large print. 

Paying for Funeral Services in Oregon

This guide has been created by the Oregon Mortuary and Cemetery Board to help funeral consumers as they look into their options for paying for the care of a loved one who has recently passed away, particularly when limited funds may pose a hardship. This document is also available in large print.

In Oregon, there is a list of people who are able to make decisions about final arrangements for a person who has passed away. It starts with the deceased person's spouse, followed by their adult children, then their parents, siblings, guardian, other kin, personal representative of their estate, and finally, a public health officer. Prior to their death, individuals may want to designate someone specific to direct their final arrangements, either someone who does not appear on that list, such as a friend, or someone who is not the first person on the list, such as the deceased person's sibling when there is an existing adult child. If they appoint someone, that appointment supersedes the list of people who can direct. You can use this form, or one that contains substantially similar information, to designate that person. 

Burial of human remains on private property is legal in Oregon, however there are things to consider before proceeding with burial on private property.

Fact Sheet: Who to Contact When a Patient Dies While Under a Caretaker’s Supervision

This document is guidance for funeral directors and caretakers when dealing with a decedent that has a caretaker.​


This information has been compiled to provide accurate and up-to-date information about the Oregon Indigent Disposition Program to community members who help families make arrangements for loved ones who have recently passed away.

The following links lead to websites for outside agencies or organizations. The Oregon Mortuary and Cemetery Board has compiled this information as a service to the public, but is not responsible for any of the information included on outside sites. 

The Division of Financial Regulation licenses people who sell contracts to prepay your funeral. The division also licenses insurance agents. Its consumer advocates can answer questions you might have about whether an agent is licensed or how a funeral (life insurance) policy might work.

The Federal Trade Commission is a consumer protection agency. The agency regulates funeral homes, and has several guides for consumers when they are shopping for services.

The goal of Funeral Consumers Alliance is to ensure consumers are fully prepared and protected when planning a funeral for themselves or their loved ones. They offer objective facts about funeral planning so families can plan a meaningful goodbye that fits their needs and their budget.

The following links lead to websites for outside agencies or organizations. The Oregon Mortuary and Cemetery Board has compiled this information as a service to the public, but is not responsible for any of the information included on outside sites. 

In Oregon, funeral directors can order death certificates for people who are eligible to receive them for up to two years after a person's death. You can also order copies of death certificates through the Oregon Center for Vital Statistics at any time. The Oregon Center for Vital Statistics is the only state agency that can issue death certificates. 

If a person has recently died, and the family making arrangements does not want to engage the services of a licensed funeral director, they may complete the arrangements themselves. Any person in Oregon can perform the duties of a funeral service practitioner without a license as long as they are not accepting payment for these services. Part of their responsibility when doing this is filing a death record (often called a death certificate.) This is a legal requirement. The Oregon Health Authority can assist you with completing this process. The documents required are often referred to as a "Home Burial Packet," although it is important to note that the burial does not need to take place at home- arrangements can be made at a cemetery.

The following links lead to websites for outside agencies or organizations. The Oregon Mortuary and Cemetery Board has compiled this information as a service to the public, but is not responsible for any of the information included on outside sites. ​

Department of Transportation 1978 Cemetery Survey

In 1978, the Oregon Department of Transportation surveyed all cemeteries in the State of Oregon and compiled their findings. This survey has not ever been repeated by a state agency. This can be helpful if conducting genealogical research, as many older cemeteries go by multiple names. (Please note- private individuals did update this survey in 2001! You can find the Oregon Burial Site Guide by Dean Byrd at many libraries in Oregon and across the country!)

OMCB does not maintain a comprehensive listing of all interments and inurnments that have occurred in Oregon. If you are seeking a specific individual's grave, we recommend that you search Find A Grave. The website contains information about cemeteries and individual memorials for many people buried in those cemeteries. 

​Oregon Parks and Recreation Department- Commission on Historic Cemeteries
The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries maintains a list of historic cemeteries and gravesites in Oregon to promote public education on the significance of historic cemeteries and provide financial and technical assistance for restoring, improving and maintaining their appearance. Cemeteries on this list may or may not be operating, and must have at least one burial prior to 1909.

The following links lead to websites for outside agencies or organizations. The Oregon Mortuary and Cemetery Board has compiled this information as a service to the public, but is not responsible for any of the information included on outside sites. 

Every year between 150 and 250 altruistic citizens of Oregon and the greater Pacific Northwest donate their bodies to the OHSU Body Donation Program for the purposes of education and research. In compliance with federal and state law, the donors and their families do not receive monetary compensation for their gift. The university does cover the cost of cremation.

Based in Lebanon, Oregon, the university accepts body donations for the purposes of education and research. The university does not compensate the family, but does cover the costs of cremation.

The Pacific Northwest Transplant Bank is the federally designated organ procurement organization serving Oregon, Southwest Washington and Western Idaho.

Donate Life Northwest maintains the organ donor registry for the state of Oregon.​

The following links lead to websites for outside agencies or organizations. The Oregon Mortuary and Cemetery Board has compiled this information as a service to the public, but is not responsible for any of the information included on outside sites. 

Burial in a VA national cemetery is open to all members of the armed forces and Veterans who have met minimum active duty service requirements. VA provides the gravesite, grave liner, opening and closing of the grave, government headstone or marker, U.S. burial flag, Presidential Memorial Certificate and perpetual care of the gravesite at no cost to the family. VA operates 135 national cemeteries and 33 soldiers' lots and monument sites in 40 states and Puerto Rico. Additional burial benefits, including monetary benefits, may also be available to veterans under certain circumstances.

The State's VA office can help connect you with services for veterans and their families, including military funeral honors, applying for burial benefits, and other needs.

The Patriot Guard Riders is a volunteer, non-profit organization which ensures dignity and respect at memorial services honoring fallen military servicemembers, first responders and honorably discharged veterans.​

The following links lead to websites for outside agencies or organizations. The Oregon Mortuary and Cemetery Board has compiled this information as a service to the public, but is not responsible for any of the information included on outside sites. 

Death with Dignity Act 

In 1997 Oregon enacted the Death with Dignity Act which allows terminally-ill Oregonians to end their lives through the voluntary self-administration of lethal medications, expressly prescribed by a physician for that purpose.
 

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