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Model Code

DLCD uses staff experts and consultants to develop model code that can be used by cities and counties. Model code is written for a number of reasons, as the examples below illustrate. It is typically created to help a local government follow best practices, or adhere to new state standards, rules, or statutes. Model codes are often tailored to suit the needs of a community. DLCD offers the following model codes as a tool or resource for local planning departments in Oregon.

Guidance on Implementing the Accessory Dwelling Units (ADU) Requirement

Senate Bill 1051 (2017) requires that cities and counties in Oregon of a certain population allow ADU's in areas zoned for detached housing. This ADU model code is written for cities to adopt in part, or in full, with or without local amendments to conform to state statute.

Model Development Code for Small Cities

Model Development Code for Small Cities addresses a wide variety of necessary code elements for a city to use as a starting point, or to adopt outright. The code package has been designed to work with additional code modules developed by DLCD. More information is available on the Model Development Code for Small Cities web page.

Multi-County Code Update Project

As statutes and rules affecting exclusive farm use (EFU) and forest zones are periodically amended, a number of Oregon counties have been unable to keep their local ordinances in compliance, often lacking sufficient staff resources for time-intensive code updates. To help address this problem, DLCD created model code language for EFU and forest zones, as well as reporting forms and a helpful user's guide, to simplify the process for counties interested in bringing their ordinances up to date.

The model code incorporates both the prescriptive and discretionary components of statutory and rule provisions that govern EFU and forest zones in Oregon, providing a framework that informs counties what their resource zones must entail and where they have flexibility in development permitting and review.

Preparing for a Cascadia Subduction Zone Tsunami: A Land Use Guide for Oregon Coastal Communities

The goal of this Land Use Guide is to help coastal communities become more resilient to a catastrophic tsunami event through community land use options and strategies. The guide is focused on a local tsunami event as these events will likely be far more destructive to an entire community and much harder to prepare for. The guide is focused on land use planning approaches to reduce tsunami hazard risk. Chapter 3 includes a set of comprehensive plan policies related to tsunami preparedness and recovery and a related text section that can be included within the Goal 7 section of the plan. Chapter 4 includes development code language to implement a tsunami hazards overlay zone.

Model Coastal Erosion Overlay Zone

The model code titled, Coastal Erosion Overlay Zone (2012), was created to aid local governments in addressing chronic coastal natural hazards. It provides for identification and assessment of risk from natural hazards, and establishes standards that limit overall risk to the community.

Model Companion: Flood Damage Prevention Ordinance

The Oregon Model Flood Damage Prevention Ordinance is in the process of being revised, please contact the Celinda Adair, NFIP Coordinator for more information. The Oregon Model Companion Flood Damage Prevention Ordinance was developed by the State of Oregon in cooperation with FEMA to help achieve compliance with the FEMA regulations. In addition to the minimum requirements, FEMA and DLCD encourage local governments to adopt higher standards that make sense for each community and their unique flood risk.

Smart Development Code Handbook

This handbook provided guidance to communities in determining whether their local codes and standards encourage, support, or impede smart development. It also aims to help reader identify whether smart development principles and ideas fit their communities, and if smart development ideas would help to achieve local goals or meet state planning requirements.

Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Module

The Transportation Demand Management Module is embedded in a guide for local governments interested in learning more about TDM. The guide includes background information about TDM, a step-by-step approach for implementing a TDM plan program, and model code language.

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