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I-205 Toll Project


Watch: How will tolls affect traffic?

Project Status

The I-205 Toll Project will add a third lane and provide seismic improvements to bridges on I-205 from Stafford Road to OR 213, and toll the Abernethy and Tualatin River Bridges. Together, the I-205 improvements and tolls will reduce congestion to give travelers a better and more reliable trip. Construction is underway on the first phase of improvements to make the Abernethy Bridge the first earthquake-ready highway bridge across the Willamette River.

Without tolls and planned roadway upgrades, daily congestion on I-205 will continue to grow up to 14 hours per day by 2045 as more people use the highway. Diversion to local streets will also increase when the interstate has stop-and-go traffic. With the planned project, congestion on I-205 would be about 2 hours per day in 2045. 

The Environmental Assessment will be available for public review and comment in late fall 2022.  

This study, called an “Environmental Assessment," will include a look at effects to travel times on I-205, traffic on surrounding neighborhood streets, the local and regional economy, household spending, noise, air quality, greenhouse gas emissions, and the natural environment, among other topic areas.

The Environmental Assessment will compare two alternatives: the Build Alternative, which would add a third lane and provide seismic improvements to bridges on I-205 from Stafford Road to OR 213, and tolls on the Abernethy and Tualatin River Bridges; and the No Build Alternative, which would have no planned improvements to I-205 and no tolls.    

While preparing the Environmental Assessment, ODOT has been sharing a preview of the study results and collecting input from local governments and community partners. With tolling and other planned improvements on I-205, we expect to see:

  • Reduced congestion and better travel times on I-205. During the afternoon peak hours (4 to 6 p.m.), travelers between Tualatin and Gladstone would see up to 50% shorter travel times, which means up to 14 minutes in time savings by 2024. During the morning peak hours (7 to 9 a.m.), I-205 travelers would experience about 25% faster travel times, saving about 4 minutes.
  • Changes in traffic patterns on some local roads include both increases and decreases in congestion at peak times. ODOT is collaborating with local governments to come up with solutions called “mitigation" that will offset negative effects.
  • ODOT is assuming $0.55 to $2.20 per bridge as estimated toll rates for environmental and financial studies. Toll rates will be set in 2024. Separately, a low-income toll program, which may include discounts or exemptions, is under consideration.
  • Freight travel times on I-205 are projected to improve in both northbound and southbound directions, decreasing by between 26% and 53% depending on peak period and direction. Businesses rely on I-205 to move their goods and services.
  • The study shows adding a third lane and providing seismic improvements to bridges on I-205 from Stafford Road to OR 213, and tolling the Abernethy and Tualatin River Bridges (Build Alternative) will encourage slightly fewer single-occupancy vehicle trips. More than one person in a car will lower travel costs compared to one person in a car paying the full toll. Tolling can also help reduce greenhouse gas emissions by encouraging carpooling and alternative modes of transportation, reduced congestion and associated car idling.
The Environmental Assessment is expected to be available for public review and comment in late fall 2022. The Oregon Transportation Commission will set toll rates in 2024. Thorough analysis, public input, construction, testing, and driver education are required for the system to work.

In summer 2022, ODOT hosted over 40 briefings with local governments, policymakers, business leaders, non-profit leaders, and community representatives to provide early results from the environmental study and an opportunity for the community to ask questions. ODOT met with cities in Clackamas County, neighborhood and business associations, and the C4 Subcommittee.

Detailed technical data was shared as part of a July update and August update.

Keep checking this website for new information on the release of the Environmental Assessment.



I-205 Toll Project & I-205 Improvements Project 

The I-205 Toll Project would add a third lane and provide seismic improvements to bridges on I-205 from Stafford Road to OR 213, and toll the Abernethy and Tualatin River Bridges. Together, the I-205 improvements and tolls will reduce congestion to give travelers a better and more reliable trip.

Construction is underway on the first phase of improvements to make the Abernethy Bridge the first earthquake-ready highway bridge across the Willamette River. 

When completed, the projects will:
  • Reduce congestion and travel times
  • Reduce crashes
  • Rebuild and upgrade bridges to be earthquake-ready

Studies show that tolling and improvements to I-205 would provide a more reliable trip, improve safety, and cut I-205 travel times by up to half.

Without tolling, the planned improvements to I-205 could not be built, and congestion, travel times, and highway crashes would continue to get worse. Diversion to local streets would also increase when the interstate has stop-and-go traffic.

We are currently studying the effects of using variable-rate tolls on I-205. Variable-rate tolling, also known as congestion pricing, charges higher prices during peak traffic periods – think rideshare surge pricing or time-of-use utility rates.

Tolling helps reduce traffic congestion by encouraging drivers to consider other travel options or times of travel. Even a small decrease in the number of people trying to get on I-205 will have travel time benefits for those who can't change their trip. According to the U.S. Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), removing as little as 5% of the vehicles from a busy road reduces can improve traffic and allows a more efficient flow of cars.



Study shows that northbound I-205 drivers between I-5 and Gladstone would see about a 50% shorter afternoon travel times and about25% shorter morning travel times. Southbound I-205 drivers would see about a 25% shorter travel times during the morning and afternoon. In addition, travel times would become more reliable, and the number of crashes would shrink, improving travel efficiency and safety.

Less congestion means fewer hours spent on interstate travel, fewer emissions and progress in meeting climate goals. 



Electronic tolling proposed for I-205 would be automated to maximize efficiency and convenience for travelers crossing the Abernethy and Tualatin River Bridges.

A transponder - a small tag or sticker placed on the windshield - is scanned by devices secured to an overhead structure, called a toll gantry, which charges the account holder. If a vehicle doesn't have a transponder, a camera captures the car's license plate, and the registered owner is billed.​
 
 

For more information about tolls click here.


​Tolls could begin on I-205 as early as late 2024. The process to implement a toll program requires substantial analysis, public input, construction, testing and driver education before the system can be operational. An Environmental Assessment for the I-205 Toll Project will be published for public review and comment in fall 2022. 

 ​Click on image to expand.

Learn about the Regional Mobility Pricing Project.​​

​Your involvement helps us create a toll program that improves the transportation network and generates infrastructure funding revenue, while meeting the unique needs of Oregon travelers. ODOT is actively seeking public and stakeholder input at key project milestones to inform project development, prioritize community mobility, and respond to equity needs. 

Upcoming Comment Period
The Environmental Assessment is expected to be released in fall 2022 and will be available for public review and comment for 45 days. We will host public events to share information and receive your input. Check back for more information and sign-up for updates to be notified about upcoming events and opportunities to provide your input.

Previous Events and Public Input
ODOT held two webinars in February 2022 to present preliminary results from ongoing traffic analysis. You can watch the webinar recordings below or view the presentation slide deck here.
To view archived outreach materials and project documents, visit the Resource Library, click on I-205 Toll Project Reports and Resources.







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