Skip to main content

Maintenance Re-Certification Information

The purpose of Maintenance Re-Certification is a directive from the Fire Policy Committee, which formed a sub-committee in 2003 to address a number of certification concerns. The maintenance requirements were a bi-product of that committee and recommended by the Oregon fire service to have DPSST implement and facilitate this process. This is a way for agencies to recognize that proficiency is maintained by either frequently using the skills (service delivery), demonstrating proficiency through some type of evaluation or assessment (task performance), or through continuing education. For a summation of the hour requirement, please see our Maintenance Re-Certification Requirement Summary Sheet. A Maintenance Re-Certification packet will be mailed to each agency every even year and verification that maintenance requirements have been completed must be submitted, via the Maintenance Re-Certification Form, to DPSST by December 31st of that same year. Maintenance Re-Certification is critical in maintaining high-functioning knowledge, skills, and abilities to meet job performance requirements.

The Fire Policy Committee (FPC) formed a sub-committee in 2003 to address a number of certification issues. The maintenance requirements were a by-product of that committee.

DPSST is mandated by Oregon Administrative Rule (OAR) to carry out this function. It was the fire service (through the FPC) who asked for this requirement and it was the fire service who revised the OARs.

Most people recognize that the only way to maintain proficiency is to either frequently use the skills, demonstrate proficiency through some type of evaluation or assessment, and/or through continuing education.


The process begins when DPSST sends agencies the Maintenance Re-Certification packet in June of every even year. The packet includes partially completed Maintenance Re-Certification forms for each Fire Service Professional with certifications and listed as active on your agency's roster. Agencies wishing to participate in Maintenance Re-Certification must complete the forms in the packet and return them to DPSST no later than December 31st of that same year.

Once the forms are submitted to DPSST, they will be processed in accordance to the date the packets are received. When they are processed, DPSST will send confirmation letters to the fire agency identifying everyone's highest, implied, and lapsed levels of certification and the new expiration dates.

Currently, the only acceptable format is the paper form sent in the Maintenance Re-Certification packet. We hope to have an electronic version available in the future.

There are three methods: Service Delivery, Task Performance, or Education and/or Training. DPSST will ask how the individual met the re-certification requirements. Your agency can use any combination of these methods because DPSST is relying on the local Fire Chief or Training Officer to make the determination that an individual has demonstrated proficiency in the essential functions of the certification they want to maintain.

The OAR definition of “service delivery” means to be able to adequately demonstrate, through job performance, the knowledge, skills, and ability of a certification level. If the agency determines an individual has demonstrated proficiency in their certification level by doing the job then it is allowable to re-certify them using this method.

The OAR definition of “task performance” means to be able to demonstrate the ability to perform the tasks, of a certification level, in a controlled environment while being evaluated. This may be accomplished through a formal task performance test, task book style verification by a field Training Officer or the agency Training Officer, or other performance measurement utilized by the agency.

This term is not specifically defined by OAR definition. However, “Education and/or Training” is intended to mean that an individual has successfully completed accredited courses, college courses pertaining to the area of certification, or a series of courses.

A fire service professional who does not meet the hour requirements can complete a task performance evaluation to demonstrate competency. Additionally, a written test or a combination of a written test and task performance evaluation can be used to meet the requirements. Keep in mind that a written test does not demonstrate proficiency for practical skills. While a written test alone would be fine for some certifications, it would not be a good idea for those requiring practical skills. Ultimately, by design it is the local agency that determines the exact method utilized.

This depends on what “Track" the certifications are located. Certifications are grouped into three Tracks (Operations, Instructor, and Prevention/Public Education/Administration). An individual only needs to complete the total required hours for each Track in which they hold a certification. The Operations Track requires 60 hours per year, the Instructor Track requires 4, and the Prevention/Public Education/Administration Track requires 12. The worst case scenario would be an individual holding a certification in each of the three Tracks, using solely the hours requirement method, they would be required to complete 76 hours of education and/or training. See the following examples for more information:


Q: I’m certified as a NFPA Fire Fighter I, NFPA Fire Fighter II, HazMat First Responder, NFPA Driver, NFPA Pumper Operator, NFPA Fire Instructor I, and NFPA Fire Officer I. If I use the Education and/or Training method, how many hours of education and/or training do I need to complete?

A: Sixty-four (64) hours total. Ideally these hours would include subject matter in each of the certification levels, but at a minimum it would include 60 hours from the Operations Track and 4 hours from the Instructor Track.


Q: I’m certified as a NFPA Fire Fighter II, HazMat On-Scene Incident Commander, and a NFPA Fire Officer IV. If I use the Education and/or Training method, how many hours of education and/or training do I need to complete?

A: Seventy two (72) hours total. Ideally these hours would include subject matter in each of the certification levels, but at a minimum it would include 60 hours from the Operations Track and 12 hours from the Prevention/Public Education/Administration Track.


Q: I’m certified as a NFPA Fire Fighter II and NFPA Fire Inspector III. I only conduct inspections in my current job and don’t care about re-certifying at NFPA Fire Fighter II. If I use the Education and/or Training method, how many hours of education and/or training do I need to complete?

A: Twelve (12) hours total. These hours must be in the Prevention/Public Education/Administration Track. Don’t forget that you could use the “Service Delivery” method. If your Training Officer will certify you as proficient through the frequency of conducting inspections, then you wouldn’t need to complete any hours.

 

Q: I’m certified as a Fire Officer I, II, III, and IV and I want to maintain all of these certifications. How many hours do I need to complete?

A: You certify at the highest level of certification. An individual can not be certified as a Fire Officer IV without first having been certified as a Fire Officer I. You would only need 12 hours from the Prevention/Public Education/Administration Track.

If the person has been out of service for more than 12 months, the certifications would have lapsed. They would fall under OAR 259-009-0067 to regain their certifications. According to this OAR, their fire service agency must have that person complete a task book, task performance evaluation or approved training for their lapsed certifications. Upon successful completion of the appropriate testing or evaluation, the fire service agency can submit a Certification Reinstatement Form.

Contact

Brooke Bell-Uribe

Phone: 503-378-2254

Email: brooke.bell-uribe@state.or.us

Your browser is out-of-date! It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites. Learn how

×