Skip to main content

About Marina Living

Currently, many people are considering the possibility of alternative living conditions including mobile/motor homes, tiny homes and even floating homes. A floating home is not necessarily a houseboat, though these terms may be used interchangeably and are often confused with each other.

A floating home need not be sea-ready, but it is just what its name suggests: a home that floats - usually docked at a marina. The definition of a floating home is one that is permanently moored and cannot move under its own power, unlike a houseboat. If you’ve been considering making the move to a floating home in the near future, it is a good idea to be aware of the pros and cons associated with this style of homeownership, to see if it’s right for you.

Some advantages of marine community living include:​

  • Stationary Savings - Unlike houseboats, floating homes don’t need a motor or method of self-propulsion. You can build upwards or outwards without affecting the cruising ability, since all it needs to do is float. You can also save on locomotion costs like gasoline because you’re not powering around the lake, marina, ocean, or sea.

  • Community Common Interests - Joining a floating home community can be an extremely enjoyable experience. Not only do neighbors tend to know each other better being so small and in such close proximity, but there’s also a general feeling that they need to take care of each other and their neighbors’ property when not at their “home sweet floating home.”

  • Spectacular Views - For nature lovers, you can also have gorgeous sunrise and sunset views out on the water, or spend time watching local animal wildlife right from the comfort of your front “porch,” or boat deck. With a floating home, you’re afforded the luxury of jumping into the water any time you feel like, making cooling off in the summer time an easy enterprise. Plus, you are guaranteed a water view and nobody can build anything that will block that view.

  • Tax Savings - In some states, owning a floating home does not technically constitute owning “real property,” and as such, there may be no property taxes associated. Some states instead consider a floating home to merely be “personal property,” and require a minimal annual personal property tax be paid. The interest on your loan payment is tax deductible as long as the houseboat is considered a qualified residence, meaning that it is either a first or second home and has a toilet, sleeping areas and cooking facilities.

  • Semi-Low Maintenance - You won’t need a gardener or a snow shovel when you live on the water. You will need to have regular maintenance on teh house boat floating mechanics.

How we can help you

The Manufactured & Marine Communities Resource Center (MMCRC) provides services and information to residents and landlords of manufactured dwelling parks and marine communities. We promote cooperative community relationships and positive alternatives to the court system if conflicts arise. Our confidential, neutral and voluntary services provide assistance to resolve disputes by promoting open communication and a positive environment.

Learn more about Live-Aboard Boating in Oregon: 

Photo: About Marina Living

Manufactured & Marine Communities Resource Center
Hotline: 1-800-453-5511 
PH: 503-986-2145 (Toll Free, Oregon)
FAX: 503-986-2006

Website Questions:

Your browser is out-of-date! It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites. Learn how

×