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Answers to Frequently Asked Questions

Esthetics

Esthetics  
Following are answers to frequently asked questions (FAQ) regarding the esthetics field of practice.
 
For FAQs on the other three fields of practice and general licensing, regulatory and health, safety and infection control, click on the links below.
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Cosmetology Laws & Rules

Following are Board of Cosmetology laws and rules upon which these frequently asked questions are based.
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OHLA Regulatory References

Following are laws and rules related to overarching administrative, procedural, licensing and regulatory compliance requirements for all OHLA-regulated professions.
If you have questions that aren't answered here, please contact OHLA at 503-378-8667 or ohla.info@state.or.us.
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Client Records Waiver Form

Q:  Do you have recommended wording or points to include in the waiver form for clients who decline to provide information for their client record?
 
A:  Use simple wording such as “Client Record Requirement:  Waiver Form – I decline to provide client information as required by state regulations.”  Be sure to spell the client’s name out and have them sign the form.
 
Following is client record requirements as specified in OAR 817-015-0065, Client Records:
 
(1) Facility owners and independent contractors providing esthetic or nail technology services must maintain client records to ensure basic client information is available to safeguard the health and well being of both the client and practitioner.
 
(2) Legible hand-written or electronic records are acceptable. Basic client information includes the client's name, address, telephone number, type of service and date of service.
 
(3) The record must include the name and registration number of the practitioner providing service, and special instructions or notations that the practitioner believes to be pertinent to providing esthetic or nail technology services to the client, such as bleeding disorders, allergies or sensitivities to chemicals or products or complications during service(s).
 
(4) A practitioner may obtain medical advice if necessary to safeguard the client or the practitioner.
 
(5) Client records must be kept at the facility premises for a minimum of two years and must be made available immediately upon request from an enforcement officer of the Oregon Health Licensing Agency.
 
(6) A practitioner may not provide services to a client who refuses to provide the personal information required by (2) of this rule unless the client signs a waiver form documenting the client’s refusal to provide the required information. The signed waiver form must be retained on file in the manner required in subsection (5) of this rule for client records.

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Massage

Q:  Can estheticians perform massage?
 
A:  Yes, but only in the delivery of skin care services, not for therapeutic purposes as a massage therapist licensed by the Board of Massage Therapists.
 
Skin Care Beyond the Basics states that massage stimulates the skin both physically and thermostatically, meaning that the heat generated by friction with the skin actually warms the surface.  A good but gentle massage with the appropriate moisturizer will increase its penetration.
 
Advanced Professional Skin Care refers to massage as pressure on the skin.  By applying pressure you can effect the blood and lymphatic flow within the skin, if you apply mild rhythmic pressure in a consistant manner the skin will be stronger in order to reduce force. It does this by laying down more collagen, elastin and building a thicker epidermis.
 
Estheticians use massage for product penetration, skin fitness (building strength) and stress reduction (stress breaks down the immune cells in the skin).
 
Estheticians receive basic massage education (approximately 35 hours) compared to a minimum of 500 hours for massage therapists.
 
Under ORS 690.005, Definitions(6) “Esthetics” means any of the following skin care practices performed on the human body for the purpose of keeping the skin healthy and attractive and not for medical diagnosis or treatment of disease or physical or mental ailments:
 
      (a) The use of the hands or mechanical or electrical apparatuses or appliances for cleansing, stimulating, manipulating, exfoliating or applying lotions or creams.
      (b) Temporary removal of hair.
      (c) Makeup artistry.
      (d) Facial and body wrapping.
      (e) Facial and body waxing.
 
OAR 817-005-005(41), Definitions, states "Manipulating" means, as referred to in ORS 690.005 articulation or massage, pressure, friction, stroking, tapping or kneading by manual or mechanical means, with or without lubricants such as salts, powders, liquids or creams, for the purpose of providing skin care.

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Rubber Mixing Bowls

Q:  We use rubber mixing bowls for our specialty masks and apply the mask with a tongue depressor. After use we throw the tongue depressor away  What is the proper way to clean the bowl and have it ready for the next client? At this time we are rinsing it with soapy water and towel drying. Do we need to do anything else?
 
A: Under OAR 817-010-0068, Disinfecting Non-Electrical Tools and Implements:
 
All tools and implements used within a field of practice shall be disinfected before use on each client. The method for disinfecting non-electrical tools and implements will be as outlined below.
 
(1) To disinfect all non-electrical tools and implements first:
 
(a) Remove all hair and/or foreign material;
 
(b) Clean thoroughly with soap or detergent and water;
 
(c) Rinse thoroughly with clear, clean water; and
 
(d) Complete process as outlined in section (2) or (3) of this rule; or
 
(e) Sterilize, using one of the approved methods listed in OAR 817-010-0065(5)(b) or (c).
 
(2) For all tools and implements without sharp edges or points, including but not limited to combs, brushes, rollers, rods, etc., totally immerse according to manufacturer's instructions in a solution containing l,000 parts per million (ppm) of a commercial quaternary ammonium compound or other low-level disinfectant used according to the manufacturer's instructions.

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Skin Tag Removal

Q:  Is removing skin tags within the scope of practice of esthetics?
 
A:  No.  While skin tags are considered benign growths, removing them is not within the esthetics scope of practice.
 
Under ORS 690.005(6), “Esthetics” means any of the following skin care practices performed on the human body for the purpose of keeping the skin healthy and attractive and not for medical diagnosis or treatment of disease or physical or mental ailments:
 
(a) The use of the hands or mechanical or electrical apparatuses or appliances for cleansing, stimulating, manipulating, exfoliating or applying lotions or creams.
 
(b) Temporary removal of hair.
 
(c) Makeup artistry.
 
(d) Facial and body wrapping.
 
(e) Facial and body waxing.

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Stone Sanitation

Q:  What is the proper way to clean and disinfect stones (used for facials and/or body treatments)?
 
A:  Under OAR 817-010-0068(2), use low-level disinfectant for all tools and implements without sharp edges or points, including but not limited to combs, brushes, rollers, rods, etc.  Follow the manufacturer’s instructions, totally immersing the tool in the disinfectant.
 
Remember to clean the stones before you disinfect them.

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