Regulatory Issues

Proposed Rules Related to Integrated Pest Management (IPM) in Schools Frequently Asked Questions

What is the purpose of the proposed School Integrated Pest Management (IPM) license category?

As requested by school representatives and other stakeholders, ODA is proposing a school IPM license category (with associated training) that is better calibrated to the laws and pesticide uses that are relevant to schools. The goals are to enhance compliance with the school IPM law and be more protective of children, while creating a more streamlined regulatory process that does not create additional costs for license holders who are already satisfied with their current license categories (Note: the proposed license category is optional, see question #2 below). ​

Will the proposed School Integrated Pest Management (IPM) license category be required? 

The proposed school IPM license category is optional. So, if you are already properly licensed to make pesticide applications on school campuses, you will not be required by ODA to add the proposed school IPM license category to do work you are already doing. Similarly, if so desired, new license applicants can choose an appropriate license category other than the proposed school IPM license category (IIHS General Pest, Ornamental & Turf Herbicide, etc). 

What are the benefits of the proposed school Integrated Pest Management (IPM) license category?

The proposed School IPM license category is designed to broadly cover the most common pesticide uses across all areas on school campuses. As proposed, it offers the following potential benefits:

  • Better training: Proposed license category signifies an individual's knowledge of the school IPM law, IPM strategies, and the increased risks posed by pesticides to children when compared to adults.
  • Covers all areas on the school campus: With certain limitations, the proposed license category would cover pesticide applications made both indoors and outdoors on the campus.
  • Lower costs for many: Most typical applications can be carried out under a single license category, rather than an applicator having to have two or more categories, as is common.
  • License category is optional: Applicators who are satisfied with their current license categories are not required to also have the School Integrated Pest Management (IPM) license category.​
Can I make pesticide applications that aren’t covered by the proposed School Integrated Pest Management (IPM) license category?

Yes, but you will need another appropriate license category, and you are still subject to the requirements of the school IPM law and the school’s IPM plan.

Is the training manual for the proposed school IPM license category the only way to learn more about the school IPM law?

No. ODA is working with the OSU Pesticide Safety Education Program to offer a breakout session on the school IPM law at the next Chemical Applicator’s Short Course and the Non-Crop Vegetative Management Course. The OSU School IPM program also offers several trainings across Oregon each year for school IPM coordinators.

Additional resources are available on ODA’s School IPM webpage​.

Temporary Rule Prohibiting the Use of Aminocyclopyrachlor on Rights-Of-Way

On September 28, 2018, ODA enacted a temporary rule prohibiting the use of any pesticide product containing the active ingredient aminocyclopyrachlor on right-of-way (ROW) sites, OAR 603-057-0391. The Temporary Administrative Rule will be in effect for 180 days, September 28, 2018-March 26, 2019.

Additional regulatory action may take place before or after the expiration date of the temporary rule.

Aminocyclopyrachlor Stakeholder Group​ Meeting 

12/18/18

​Contact

Rose Kachadoorian
Program Manager
Phone: 503-986-4651
Dale Mitchell
Program Manager
Phone: 503-986-4646
​​