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Safe Injections: One and Only Campaign

Oregon is a Partner State in the CDC's One & Only Campaign

Campaign logoThe One & Only Campaign is a public health campaign, led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Safe Injection Practices Coalition (SIPC), to raise awareness among patients and healthcare providers about safe injection practices. The campaign aims to eradicate outbreaks resulting from unsafe injection practices.

Raising awareness among healthcare providers and patients is critical to eliminating preventable infections caused by unsafe injections.


Injection and Needle Safety Toolkit

Although injections and needle use in professional settings are generally safe, unsafe practices do happen and may cause serious harm.

Unsafe practices, like reusing vials or syringes, have the potential to spread disease by cross-contaminating body fluids. Since 2001, more than 150,000 people in the U.S. have been notified of potential exposure to viral hepatitis and HIV due to lapses in injection and needle safety.

Do your part. Three ways to help stop these infections!

  1. Join the One & Only Campaign! This campaign is led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Safe Injection Practices Coalition (SIPC) and raises awareness about safe injection practices.
  2. Learn about best practices by using this toolkit.
  3. Share what you learn from the toolkit with those in your workplace.

Disclaimer: The resources below contain overlapping information on best practices, but are by no means comprehensive, as new resources continually emerge. In addition, the links provided do not serve as an endorsement of the organizations.

Toolkit Contents

For the Public

For Health Professionals

Feedback

  • We want to hear from you! Let us know what you think about this toolkit by completing this quick feedback form. 

For the Public

What to know about receiving healthcare involving needles

 

Needle Safety

Syringe Exchange Program

Resources for Self-Injections

Needle Disposal


For Health Professionals

 

Guidelines and Recommendations

Rules and Regulatory Guidance

Tools for Facility Assessment

 

Aseptic Technique

Skin Preparation

Rubber Septum

Accessing Central Lines

 

Needle Safety

What to Do After a Needle-stick

Waste Disposal

 

Medication and Treatment Management

Storage

Preparation

Mixing (Admixture)
Compounding
Reconstituting
Administration

Vial Safety

Special Topics

 

Diabetes Care

 

Disease Transmission and Outbreaks

 

Specialty-Specific Resources

Blood Draw/Phlebotomy

Dentistry

Dialysis

Immunization

Point of Care Testing Involving Finger-stick

Surgery

  • CDC Infection Prevention in Outpatient Surgery Centers
    PowerPoint Presentation: A 2012 presentation given by Dr. Melissa Schaefer (CDC) on the impact of best practice breaches, as well as a summary of guidelines for injection safety and ensuring aseptic technique is followed.

Acupuncture

Dry Needling

Micro Needling/Dermal Needling

Prolotherapy

Wet Cupping

 

More Resources for Health Professionals

Consider these opportunities to keep up to date on issues of public health concern

  • CDC It's Real. It's Recent.
    Flyer: CDC's One and Only Campaign describes the impact of unsafe injection practices and why health departments need the toolkit.

  • CDC What Works
    Outreach Recommendations: CDC's One and Only Campaign provides outreach tips and links to additional resources to assist in organizational training and raising awareness for injection safety.

  • Oregon Health Alert Network
    Web System: Oregon Health Authority provides a regional network that allows for sharing of health data among health professionals, public safety professionals, and public health partners.

  For more information, contact Roza Tammer at roza.p.tammer@state.or.us or call 971-673-1074.

 

References

Dolan SA, Arias KM, Felizardo G, Barnes S, Kraska S, Patrick M, Bumsted A. APIC position paper: Safe injection, infusion, and medication vial practices in health care. American Journal of Infection Control 2016; 44(7):750-757. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0196655316002832

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