Skip to the main content of the page

Occupational Therapy Licensing Board

The Pain Management rule has changed as a result of the passage of HB 2078 (2021)  Licensees must complete the 1 hour course starting 2022 and must demonstrate completion starting with 2024 RENEWALS.

339-020-0015 CE on Pain Management

(1) Beginning in 2022, all applicants for license renewal must complete the <(1 hour)> Oregon Pain Management Commission's pain management course during each license cycle.

(2) Beginning in 2024, as part of the renewal process, all applicants for renewal must demonstrate completion of the Oregon Pain Management Commission's pain management course in a format prescribed by the Board during every license renewal.

(3) This required CE on pain management may also be used towards satisfying the Occupational Therapy CE requirement under OAR 339-020-0010.


 

 

Go to the Pain Commission for more information:  

http://www.oregon.gov/oha/hpa/csi-pmc/pages/index.aspx

 

Link to the required Pain Management module:

www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/CSI-PMC/Pages/module.aspx.

 


  


Link to IASP Curriculum Outline on Pain for Occupational Therapy:

https://www.iasp-pain.org/Education/CurriculumDetail.aspx?ItemNumber=7069​

 

 

Important information:

·         Keep certificate in case you are audited for CE.


·         Pain CE taken as a student does not count - you must be a licensed OT or OTA and complete the requirement.  

​​​​​​​
​​​​​​​​​​​​
​The Pain Management rule has changed as a result of the passage of HB 2078 (2021)  Licensees must complete the 1 hour course starting 2022 and must demonstrate completion starting with 2024 RENEWALS.

New rule now in effect:

339-020-0015   CE on Pain Management​

Rule change a result of the passage of HB 2078.

339-020-0015 CE on Pain Management

(1) Beginning in 2022, all applicants for license renewal must complete the Oregon Pain Management Commission's pain management <(1 hour)> course during each license cycle.

(2) Beginning in 2024, as part of the renewal process, all applicants for renewal must demonstrate completion of the Oregon Pain Management Commission's pain management course in a format prescribed by the Board during every license renewal.

(3) This required CE on pain management may also be used towards satisfying the Occupational Therapy CE requirement under OAR 339-020-0010.​


The American OT Association also has information on pain management for OT:   
       
What can an occupational therapist do?
  • Identify specific activities or behaviors that aggravate pain and suggest alternatives.
  • Teach methods for decreasing the frequency and duration of painful episodes.
  • Implement therapy interventions that may decrease dependence on or use of pain medications.
  • Facilitate the development of better function for daily activities at work and home.
  • Collaborate with the client's team of health care professionals, such as physicians, physical therapists, psychiatrists, and psychologists, to determine the best course of treatment and intervention.
  • Recommend and teach the client how to use adaptive equipment to decrease pain while performing tasks such as reaching, dressing, bathing, and perform household chores.

What can a person with chronic pain do?
  • Develop and practice a lifestyle based on wellness, which includes plenty of rest, exercise, healthy nutrition, and maintaining a positive attitude.
  • Practice techniques to decrease the intensity of pain.
  • Organize a daily routine with personal pain management goals, such as eliminating or modifying activities that use a lot of energy and implementing body mechanics that move the body in ways that are less likely to aggravate pain.
  • Exercise to increase strength and flexibility and reduce pain.
  • Practice relaxation techniques that calm the mind and reduce tensions that aggravate pain.
Need more information?
Chronic pain is a serious problem that should not go untreated. If you would like to consult an occupational therapist about pain management, practitioners are available through most hospitals, community clinics, and medical centers.
Occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants are trained in helping both adults and children with a broad range of physical, developmental, and psychological conditions. Practitioners also help clients in wellness techniques that may prevent injury and disease. Contact your local health officials for more information.
Copyright 2002 American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc. All Rights
​​