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OSCaR Data and Publications

Oregon Data and Reports

Cancer is a common disease that has no single cause or simple cure. The lifetime risk of developing or dying from cancer is one out of three in the United States. In Oregon, approximately 20,000 people are newly diagnosed with an invasive cancer each year. As a state, Oregon works to reduce the number of people affected by cancer through cancer prevention, early detection and survivorship.

Counts reported in the below tables include a "total" that may not add up to the male and female combined counts as there are other gender categories included. In addition, all the cancer sites reported include cancers that have spread beyond the layer of tissue of origin (i.e., invasive cancers) except for the urinary bladder, which includes both cancers confined to the original site (in situ) and those that spread beyond (invasive).

Each cancer case can take a long time to accurately diagnose, treat and report to the Oregon State Cancer Registry (OSCaR). To assure data quality, OSCaR only includes cancer cases in its reports 24 months after first diagnosis. Read Understanding OSCaR Data to learn about current methods used in the data analysis of cancer in Oregon.

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Cancers related to modifiable risk factors

There are many things that affect a person’s chances of getting cancer. Common risk factors for cancer include age, family history, some behaviors and environmental exposures. Some cancer risk factors, such as age and family history, can’t be changed. Other cancer risk factors, such as smoking and alcohol use, can be changed and are called “modifiable risk factors”.

The table below includes a list of cancers associated with some common modifiable risk factors. The new diagnoses and deaths from these cancers are available in the new cancer diagnoses and cancer deaths tables. Risk factors listed include:

  • Alcohol use: Alcohol is a known cause of many cancers, especially digestive tract and liver cancers. Alcohol use can be reduced through education and policy changes that reduce the accessibility and consumption of alcohol.
  • Obesity: People living with obesity are at higher risk of several cancers, even if they are physically active. Risk of obesity can be reduced through better nutrition and more physical activity. Communities that improve access to fruits and vegetables, parks and public transportation can help people reduce the risk of obesity.
  • Physical inactivity: People who are physically inactive are at higher risk of some cancers, even if they have a healthy weight. For most people, the most effective approach to increasing physical activity is to make activities such as walking or biking convenient, safe and attractive.
  • Tobacco use: Tobacco use causes cancers in nearly every system of the body, including over fifteen kinds of cancer. Tobacco use can be reduced through cessation interventions and policy changes that reduce the availability of tobacco in the retail environment and create smoke-free environments.

List of cancers and significant associated modifiable risk factors

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Annual diagnoses and deaths 2011-2015

New cancer diagnoses
Includes new cancer diagnosis rates and counts for the most common cancers, screenable cancers, selected rare cancers with environmental concerns and cancers related to modifiable risk factors. These cancers include among others, breast, lung and bronchus, prostate, colorectal, melanoma of the skin and other cancers.

Cancer deaths
Includes the death rates and counts for the most common cancers, screenable cancers, selected rare cancers with environmental concerns and cancers related to modifiable risk factors.

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Human papillomavirus (HPV) related cancers 2011-2015

New cancer diagnoses
Includes new cancer diagnosis rates and counts for cancers related to HPV.

Cancer deaths
Includes the death rates and counts for cancers related to HPV.

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New diagnoses and deaths by race and ethnicity 2011-2015

New cancer diagnoses and deaths by race
Includes new cancer diagnosis rates and counts for the fifteen most common cancers. This includes breast, lung and bronchus, prostate, colorectal and melanoma of the skin.

New cancer diagnoses and deaths by ethnicity
Includes the death rates and counts for the most common cancers.

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County level annual diagnoses and deaths, 2011-2015

Includes new cases and deaths among Oregonians from the fifteen most common cancers.

All cancers

Brain and central nervous system cancer

Colorectal cancer

Uterus cancer

Female breast cancer

Kidney cancer

Leukemia

Liver and intrahepatic bile duct cancer

Lung cancer

Melanoma of the skin cancer

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma cancer

Ovarian cancer

Pancreas cancer

Prostate cancer

Thyroid cancer

Urinary bladder cancer

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Older Oregon cancer reports

2011

ar2010_table3a.pdfTable 1: Oregon Cancer Incidence by Site, Sex and Year, 2007-2011

Table 2: Oregon Cancer Mortality by Site, Sex and Year, 2007-2011

2010

ar2010_table3a.pdfComplete Report: Cancer in Oregon, 2010

ar2010_table3a.pdfExecutive Summary

ar2010_table3a.pdfTable 1: Oregon Cancer Incidence by Site, Sex and Year, 2006-2010

ar2010_table3a.pdfTable 2: Oregon Cancer Mortality by Site, Sex and Year, 2006-2010

ar2010_table3a.pdfTable 3a: Oregon Cancer Incidence and Mortality by County, 2001-2010

ar2010_table3b.pdfTable 3b: Oregon Breast Cancer Incidence by County, 2001-2010

ar2010_table3c.pdfTable 3c: Oregon Colorectal Cancer Incidence by County, 2001-2010

ar2010_table3d.pdfTable 3d: Oregon Lung Cancer Incidence by County, 2001-2010

ar2010_table3e.pdfTable 3e: Oregon Melanoma of the Skin by County, 2001-2010

ar2010_table3f.pdfTable 3f: Oregon Prostate Cancer Incidence by County, 2001-2010

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CD Summary Newsletters

The CD Summary is a publication of the Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division, and is distributed every two weeks. The intended audience is licensed health care providers; public health and health care agencies; media representatives; medical laboratories; hospitals; and other individuals and institutions with an interest in epidemiology and public health interests.

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