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February 2024

The toll system will be all electronic and not have toll booths. Drivers can register for an account online, by mail, by phone, and in-person.

Learn how tolls raise revenue and improve traffic 

In Oregon, tolls are being planned to help manage traffic and raise funds for roadway or bridge improvements. We are working to achieve these goals while limiting the number of cars that will reroute onto nearby streets. Depending on specific project goals, we can design a toll project to manage traffic or raise funds by adjusting:

  • Toll rates.
  • The number and location of toll points (where tolls are charged).
  • Hours of toll operations (when tolls are charged).
When determining toll rates, we also need to account for discounts and exemptions. As more discounts and exemptions are added, we may need to increase toll rates to meet a specific revenue target (to pay for a bridge replacement, for example) or to effectively reduce congestion.

Last month, we shared a presentation about tolling objectives with a Special Subcommittee of the Oregon Legislature and discussed how tolling can achieve different objectives. Read on to learn more about what we presented and how we are building the Oregon Toll Program.

Tolls offer a solution to multiple transportation problems

Tolls can help us solve multiple problems by reducing traffic on the highway and raising funds to help pay for road maintenance and improvements, and safety projects. These could include:
  • Improvements to make bridges earthquake-ready, making travel safer
  • Routine maintenance, like fixing potholes, making travel smoother
  • Periodic repairs, such as repaving, keeping roads in good condition
  • Capital improvements, such as reconstructing an existing road for better or safer multimodal travel, providing transportation options to meet your needs

To reduce traffic congestion and generate revenue for improvements like the ones listed above, toll rates will need to be high enough to reduce traffic, but low enough that some people still take the highway and get a faster trip. If only a fraction of travelers – even as small as 5% – avoid a congested roadway, traffic flow will improve, allowing more cars to move through the same space. The Oregon Transportation Commission will set toll rates at least six months before tolling begins. Right now, we're continuing our analysis of potential toll fees that would reduce traffic and meet our revenue goals.

View our presentation to the Oregon Legislature for more information and visit the Oregon Legislature's website to stay tuned for future meetings about tolling topics.

Projects in development

The I-205 Toll Project will collect tolls at the Abernethy Bridge, which spans the Willamette River between Oregon City and West Linn. Toll revenue will help fund the improvements associated with the I-205 Abernethy Bridge Project, which includes making the bridge wider and earthquake ready, building a new roundabout, and improving bike and pedestrian options near the bridge.

The Interstate Bridge Replacement program will collect tolls to help fund the replacement of the aging bridge across the Columbia River with a modern, earthquake ready, multimodal structure that includes high-capacity transit and safety improvements for bicyclists and pedestrians. Due to the bi-state nature of the Interstate Bridge, toll rates and policies will be set by the Oregon and Washington transportation commissions.

The Regional Mobility Pricing Project will toll I-5 and I-205 in the Portland metro area to provide faster, more efficient trips and to help pay for transportation improvements. Tolls will be spread across I-5 and I-205 between the Columbia River and Wilsonville and vary by time of day and location with a set schedule determined in advance by the Oregon Transportation Commission. Toll revenue will be reinvested in these corridors to fund maintenance and capital improvements.

Oregon tolls: Major milestones ahead in 2024 

In 2024, we will continue to work with our communities and regional partners to shape toll policies, rules, and project designs.

Currently, the I-205 Toll Project for the Abernethy Bridge and the Regional Mobility Pricing Project on I-5 and I-205 are in the federal environmental review phase where we analyze the benefits and effects of the toll projects. Meanwhile, we are also working to establish the toll systems necessary for toll collection and operations and continuing to work with the public to bring their ideas and priorities into the planning process.

2024 will bring more milestones for the Oregon Toll Program—and many opportunities for the public to weigh in along the way. You can read more in our recently published Oregon Toll Program Implementation Report here.

Spring 2024: Draft rules reflecting community input will be published for public comment

An important part of establishing a new toll system is establishing the rules that guide setting of toll rates, customer enrollment, account management, payments, enforcement, exemptions and more.

To better understand the customer perspective, ODOT collaborated with organizations and agencies across the state to gather feedback and insights. We held 9 Statewide Toll Rulemaking Advisory Committee meetings and also heard from nearly 5,000 people, including 22 community organizations, 88 community discussion group participants, and 94 trucking representatives.

Thank you to the 15 community members who served on the Statewide Toll Rulemaking Advisory Committee and provided feedback on a set of draft rules for how tolling would work. 

“There is a lot of work that is captured here. It demonstrates that ODOT is listening and capturing those comments and responding where appropriate too and altering the rulemaking upfront before we have something to present to OTC for their consideration and obviously the comment period." – Sean Philbrook, Statewide Toll Rulemaking Advisory Committee Member

Below is an example of some of the ways we responded to public feedback and insights gathered through these meetings and discussion groups.

What we heard
How we responded
Make it easy to sign up for toll accounts.
Our toll program will have many options for signing up. Drivers can register for an account online, by mail, by phone, and in-person. 
Make toll accounts compatible with other toll systems.
Our toll program will have Oregon toll accounts that work with Washington’s toll system. 
Provide multiple ways to pay.
Our toll program will provide many options for customers to pay their bills. Drivers can pay online, by mail, or in-person with credit card, cash, or check. 
Help people resolve unpaid bills.
Our toll program will have an additional grace period to resolve unpaid toll bills.  
Reduce the financial burden of tolls.
Our toll program will have a low-income discount of at least 50% for people living at or below 200% of the Federal Poverty Level.
Make it easy for the freight community to sign up and pay tolls.
Our toll program will work with other toll programs, like BestPass and PrePass. 


Read more about the rulemaking engagement process in the 2023 report and recommendations for the low-income toll program here. Learn more about the Statewide Toll Rulemaking Advisory Committee process and recommendations here.

What's next?  

In early 2024, ODOT will review the draft rules with the Department of Justice and publish the rules on the Secretary of State's website. After publishing the rules, ODOT will hold a public comment period and public hearing in 2024. ODOT plans to bring the rules to the Oregon Transportation Commission for their adoption in mid-2024. Stay tuned for more information at oregontolling.org.

Summer 2024: I-205 Toll Project Supplemental Environmental Assessment to be published for public review and comment

Since the publication of the I-205 Toll Project 2023 Environmental Assessment, we've made changes to the scope of the project and reviewed comments from partner agencies and the community. Details about those changes are outlined in the Urban Mobility Strategy's 2023 Finance Plan.

To account for the adjusted scope and feedback, we're preparing a Supplemental Environmental Assessment. Updated findings will be released in summer 2024 followed by a 30-day public comment period.

​Listening to Learn: Toll Program 2023 Community Engagement

As 2023 comes to a close, we want to thank the thousands of community members and regional partners who shared feedback with us over the past year. Community input has been a priority for the Oregon Toll Program over the past six years, and we've made changes to the toll program in response.

We also deepened our engagement in response to Governor Kotek's direction in May 2023 to conduct more community outreach.

How have we engaged with the community?

Guided by regional leaders and community members on ODOT's toll advisory committees, we went out into the community:


  • More than 4,500 people reached through tabling at 28 community events and locations
  • 8,706 responses to the Toll Options Survey
  • More than 600 comments collected
  • 21 meetings with partner agencies
  • 13 interviews with community-based organizations

Learn more about ODOT’s community engagement here or watch our video about how we engaged the community in Summer 2023.

What are we doing with community input?

Your feedback makes a difference in planning the toll program. All of the comments we received this year – whether from a survey, an email, a phone call, or a conversation at a community event – were summarized and shared with regional leaders, project staff, and toll advisory committee leaders.

James Paulson, a member of the Equity and Mobility Advisory Committee said, “You start with being grounded in listening. Not listening to respond, but listening to learn. This engagement raised my understanding of someone else's perception, someone else's situation. Now I have more clarity I can bring to this work.“

You can learn more by reviewing the reports that summarize engagement and comments:

  • What we heard about potential benefits and impacts of the I-205 Toll Project in Spring 2023 and how we're responding now that the project has been reduced in scope.
  • Input and survey results that will guide the development of regional tolling options on I-5 and I-205.
  • Feedback from the community and the Statewide Toll Rulemaking Advisory Committee to determine how customers will interact with and use Oregon's toll system, and how toll rates will be set and adjusted.
  • Comments received in Spring 2023 on the range of community and environmental issues to study for the Regional Mobility Pricing Project, the regional toll project for I-5 and I-205

What's next?

Informed by feedback to date and as directed by Governor Kotek, we've developed an implementation report to document the agency's plans to address equity concerns in the toll program and minimize traffic diversion on local roads. These implementation plans were shared with the OTC on Tuesday, Dec. 12 and will be delivered to Governor Kotek on Friday, Dec. 15.

We're doing more work to analyze both toll projects in response to public comments and new information. Visit the I-205 Toll Project and Regional Mobility Pricing Project webpages to learn more.

Stay tuned for more events in your community! Look for future opportunities at oregontolling.org.


OTC commits to launching a low-income toll program that will set a national precedent

On Dec. 12, the Oregon Transportation Commission (OTC) provided direction to extend eligibility for the low-income toll program to residents of both Oregon and Washington and to offer a 50% discount for customers with incomes up to 200% of the federal poverty level ($60K/year for a family of four). In addition to this program, members of federally recognized tribes, as well as transit, military, and emergency response vehicles will be exempt from tolls. ODOT will study additional discount options for the low-income toll program when more information on toll rates is available.

Specifically, the OTC provided the following direction for the low-income toll program:

  • Residents of Oregon and Washington would be eligible to sign up.
  • Customers with incomes up to 200% of the federal poverty level ($60,000/year for a family of four) would be eligible for a 50% discount on each trip.
  • ODOT will analyze whether additional discounts for households earning up to 400% of the Federal Poverty Level can be offered and still meet the toll program's congestion management, revenue, and equity goals.
This direction was guided by recommendations provided on Nov. 9 by members of the Equity and Mobility Advisory Committee (EMAC) and ODOT staff based on years of engagement with trusted community organizations, community members, and historically underserved communities.

The draft administrative rules for the low-income toll program will be published for public review and comment following Department of Justice review in 2024. In addition to rules related to discounts and exemptions, the draft rules cover the toll rate setting process, customer accounts and enrollment, vehicle classification, and the toll payment process. ODOT plans to bring the rules to the OTC for possible adoption in mid-2024. To stay informed, sign up to receive emails about OTC and EMAC meetings. 

​Thank you for participating in the tolling options survey!

The Oregon Toll Program outreach team discusses a recent survey about tolling with community members. 

The Regional Mobility Pricing Project recently wrapped up a survey asking for feedback on all-lane tolling options, including All-User Tolling and Zone Tolling. Both options:
  • Toll portions of I-5 and I-205 in the Portland metro region.
  • Toll vehicles on all lanes with an all-electronic system.
  • Do not charge a toll overnight.
  • Charge higher tolls during rush hours and in areas with more traffic.
  • Have a set toll schedule so you know the toll before your trip.
  • Allow for average travel speeds of 40 to 55 mph to get you a faster trip.
  • Would include a discount for low-income travelers.
We will compare each tolling option to a “No Action" scenario where there would be no regional tolling on I-5 and I-205.  Using models, we will evaluate outcomes with and without regional tolling for travel times and congestion on I-5 and I-205, and major local roads. We will also consider effects on travel efficiency and safety for all modes (car, freight, transit, bicycle, etc.) and on meeting statewide goals for greenhouse gas reduction for Oregon and the Portland metro region.

We received over 8,700 responses! We are reviewing your responses and look forward to sharing results with you, local communities, and project partners later this year. Your input will help us refine the project to make sure we are building the right toll program.

Missed the survey? You can still share what you think in the following ways:
Learn more about the Regional Mobility Pricing Project and opportunities to get involved here

Take our survey by Oct.9!

In response to partner and community feedback, we developed three tolling options for a regional toll system on I-205 and I-5 and compared how well each option would reduce bumper-to-bumper traffic, raise funds for transportation improvements, and meet other regional goals. We're seeking input from community members and regional partners to help inform how we move ahead with regional tolling. ODOT was directed by the legislature in 2017 and 2021 to implement tolls for people who drive cars on I-5 and I-205.

Share what you think about the regional tolling options in our online survey by Oct. 9


Your input will help us refine the project before we analyze the benefits and effects and share the results for public review and comment in a report called an Environmental Assessment. The earliest tolling could begin is 2026.

Tolling will bring changes to the Portland metro region—and it will help improve our transportation system. There are many decisions still to be made for this project, and we need to hear from you to help us build a regional tolling system that works for our communities.

We welcome comments at any time! In addition to the survey, here are other ways to give your feedback:

Learn more about the Regional Mobility Pricing Project here.  

Summer 2023 - thank you for a successful season of community engagement

Talking through the new project map at the Gresham Library on September 6, 2023.

Our Oregon Toll Program's key priorities are keeping you informed and sharing your feedback with project decision-makers. We've met and spoken with nearly 4,000 people at more than 20 events between June and October, and we're looking for continued opportunities to be involved in your community, including at local libraries, community centers and festivals. Be sure to check out our events calendar for the latest schedule and updates.

Want to plan a briefing or engagement opportunity for your community? Reach out to  oregontolling@odot.oregon.gov.

What we heard in the community

We've received many questions about what's ahead for Oregon tolling, including:

  • How will people pay tolls? Tolls will be collected through an all-electronic system, meaning no tollbooths and no slowing down to pay a toll. You will be able to sign up for a toll transponder to quickly and easily pay your tolls directly. 
  • Will there be discounts? Yes! We are working with community members to develop a low-income toll program. Visit our Statewide Toll Rulemaking Advisory Committee web page for more information.  
  • How much will tolls cost? We are reviewing potential toll rate options for our analysis that balance keeping traffic moving and generating revenue for necessary transportation projects in our region as well as operations and maintenance of the tolled highway. Information on study rates for the Regional Mobility Pricing Project and the I-205 toll at Abernethy Bridge will be available in 2024. The Oregon Transportation Commission is responsible for setting final toll rates, which will take place about six months before tolling is planned to launch in 2026.  
  • How can I provide feedback on the project? We're always listening! You can call, email, or request a briefing for your organization. Visit our Contact us page for more information.

El Grito festival.jpg Oregon Toll Program staff speak with attendees at Hillsboro's 2023 El Grito Festival in September. 

What's next for the I-205 Toll Project

Several of you also asked about the I-205 Toll Project after Gov. Kotek directed ODOT to delay tolling until 2026. We previously shared that we are preparing a Supplemental Environmental Assessment, which will be available for public review and comment in summer 2024.

Stay tuned for more information about the I-205 Toll Project in next month's newsletter! We'll be sharing a summary of the more than 2,800 comments and responses to frequently received comments from the 2023 I-205 Toll Project Environmental Assessment comment period earlier this year, along with more information about the updated I-205 Toll Project. ​

Toll Program continues conversations with community


Even as the seasons change, the Oregon Toll Program team is continuing to reach out to community members around the region. We've attended nearly 25 events since June with several more scheduled in September and October. Come find us at the following events and locations or ​ check out our events calendar for more details:

Where to find us this month:

Celebrating Hispanic American Heritage Month

National Hispanic American Heritage Month takes place annually from September 15 – October 15. It's a time to uplift and celebrate the contributions and cultures of Hispanic and Latino/a/x/e Americans. There are many ways for you to get involved in the month's festivities – we're participating by attending Hillsboro's El Grito festival and the Adelante Mujeres Farmers Market in Forest Grove.

  • El Grito commemorates Mexico's independence from Spain in the early 1800s. Events around the region celebrate this and six other Latin American nations' independence days – also happening throughout Hispanic Heritage Month – with music, dance, food, arts and more. We had a great time joining the Hillsboro community for their El Grito celebrations. Centro Cultural is the oldest culturally-specific Latino organization in Oregon, and they hosted this year's festival in partnership with the City of Hillsboro!
  • Adelante Mujeres is a nonprofit founded in 2002 that is focused on empowering Latine women in Oregon. We'll have a table at the Forest Grove Farmers Market on September 27, 2023. Adelante Mujeres launched the market series in 2005, and they continue to connect small farmers and producers with the community every Wednesday evening from May to October. 

Building a toll program that works for communities

ODOT is continuing conversations across greater Portland to build a toll program that works for local communities. In July and August, ODOT held eight discussion groups in partnership with the Community Engagement Liaisons program. We talked with community members about plans for toll accounts, payment options and process, data privacy, and discounts and exemptions. Participants then shared ideas about how to make it easy to sign-up for an account, update information, and pay bills on time.

Community Engagement Liaisons are active community leaders who provide interpretation, translation and engagement services for toll projects. ODOT has held 41 discussion groups with liaisons since the start of the Oregon Toll Program.

About the July and August community discussion groups
ODOT partnered with the Community Engagement Liaison program to facilitate conversations with community members representing various perspectives, including people who identify as Vietnamese, Chinese, Latinx, Black and African, Indigenous, Slavic, and people living with disabilities. Community members who attend the discussion groups are compensated for their time and participation.

What we shared; what we heard

Oregon Toll Program updates: We shared information about how tolling will work on I-5 and I-205 and provided a brief update on the Regional Mobility Pricing Project and the I-205 Toll Project.

Toll accounts:

We shared that we are looking into multiple ways customers can register for an account and pay their toll bill, including with cash, in person, or by mail. We asked participants about the best ways to encourage community members to sign up for accounts.  

What we heard:

  • Suggestion to partner with local community-based organizations to share information and help get people signed up for accounts.
  • Suggestions to offer incentives, like free trips, to sign up for accounts.
  • Interest in signing up for pre-paid accounts to save money and to not be surprised by a bill in the mail.
  • Offering locations for people to sign up that they visit frequently, like grocery stores.
  • Providing signage on the highways about how to sign up for an account. 

Toll account data:

We shared ODOT's draft plan for collecting data and asked participants about the best ways to keep information up to date on toll accounts. 

What we heard:

  • Provide a pop-up reminder to update your information when signing in to
  • your toll account or replenishing funds.
  • Send text and email reminders to update your information.
  • Offer a mobile app to manage your account information.

Toll payment process:

We shared ODOT's draft plan for collecting payments and asked participants about the best communication methods to let people know about payment options.

What we heard:

  • Employ customer service agents who speak different languages, since
  • automated systems can be challenging for people that speak English as a second language.
  • Provide notices and bills in multiple languages.
  • Send text and email reminders to pay your bill.
  • Concerns about receiving a surprise bill in the mail when someone borrows your car.

Discounts and exemptions:

We shared ODOT's draft plan for discounts and exemptions and asked participants about the best ways to provide income information.

What we heard:

  • Questions about how to apply a discount to different vehicles.
  • Concerns that people who are undocumented do not qualify for programs used to provide income information, like SNAP.
  • Provide more details on how data will be protected will help people feel more comfortable sharing income and other information.
Community feedback will improve the Oregon Toll Program
We will share input from these discussion groups with the Statewide Toll Rulemaking Advisory Committee for consideration during their September and October meetings. Here are additional ways community members can help us create a tolling program that works for our communities:
  • Join us for the next Statewide Toll Rulemaking Advisory Committee meeting! The next meeting will take place September 22, 9 a.m. – 12 p.m. Attend to learn more about low-income discounts for the Oregon Toll Program. Watch the YouTube livestream and view meeting materials on the project website.
  • Share your feedback. Send your comments to oregontollrules@odot.oregon.gov with “STRAC Public Comment" in the subject line.
The Statewide Toll Rulemaking Advisory Committee (STRAC) and the Equity and Mobility Advisory Committee (EMAC) held a committee workshop on July 21 to discuss the Low-Income Toll Program, vehicle rates, discounts and exemptions, and rate setting and adjusting. The meeting recording is available on the Oregon Toll Program's YouTube channel.

ODOT to analyze benefits and impacts of smaller I-205 Toll Project​

Governor Tina Kotek directed ODOT to delay the collection of tolls until 2026 in response to concerns from legislators and Clackamas County residents regarding equity and possible diversion of drivers onto local streets.

In June, ODOT reported that the delay meant the agency would need to manage available funding more conservatively and reduce the sc​ope of the planned improvements to I-205, including indefinitely postponing the second phase of construction.

As a result of these changes  – which include not collecting a toll at the Tualatin Bridge and not adding a third lane – the project has been reduced in scope from the project presented to the community for public comment in the February 2023 Environmental Assessment. With these changes, the I-205 Toll Project would add a toll at the Abernethy Bridge to pay a portion of construction of seismic improvements at the facility.

To analyze the effects of these changes, ODOT and FHWA will prepare a Supplemental Environmental Assessment for the I-205 Toll Project. The Supplemental Environmental Assessment will analyze the effects of project changes on the transportation system, local communities, the economy, and the natural environment, and consideration of potential solutions to address negative effects. This Supplemental Environmental Assessment will be released for public comment in the coming months.

Making community connections around the region this summer

Statewide Toll Rulemaking Advisory Committee members gather for their orientation meeting in January 2023.

​The Oregon Toll Program team has been busy this summer, meeting with hundreds of community members at multiple events – from festivals to farmers markets to community walks. At these events, we've continued sharing the latest project information and learning from your questions and comments. Some of the top questions we've received include:
  • When will tolling begin? As soon as 2026. 
  • How will tolls be collected? Will there be toll booths? Tolls collected on I-205 and I-5 will be all-electronic, meaning no stopping to put change in a tollbooth and no slowdowns to collect tolls. Watch this video to learn how it works.
  • Will there be a discount program? Yes! We have been working on developing a low-income toll program that will include discounts for people who qualify. Visit our Statewide Toll Rulemaking Advisory Committee to see how you can keep up-to-date with the latest information about how this program is being developed. 

Looking ahead

There are still more opportunities to find us at an event near you! Come find our table at the following events or check out our events calendar for more detail:
Community organizations share ideas for an easy-to-use toll program


Community organizations discuss tolling.

ODOT is continuing conversations with community organizations across greater Portland about developing a toll program that works best for the region. On June 6, ODOT held the fourth meeting in a series of discussion groups to talk about plans for toll accounts, payment options and process, and data privacy. We heard ideas for the best ways to share information about signing up for toll accounts and suggestions for easy access and improving equity in the toll collection process.

About the June 6 discussion group
Erika McCalpine, ODOT's Assistant Director for the Office of Equity and Civil Rights, facilitated the conversation with representatives from 11 organizations across the greater Portland area, including organizations that serve the Black/African American, Latina/o and Muslim communities, local businesses, and people with disabilities. We were also joined by representatives from committees advising ODOT on tolling implementation: Equity & Mobility Advisory Committee and Statewide Toll Rulemaking Advisory Committee. To date, ODOT has held four discussion groups with community organizations. Community representatives are compensated for their time and participation.

What we shared; what we heard
During the meeting, we provided updates on the Oregon Toll Program, followed up with community organizations on what we heard at the April discussion group, and reviewed new information about toll accounts, payment options and process, and data privacy.

Oregon Toll Program updates: We shared a brief update on outcomes and resources available from recent engagement periods for both the Regional Mobility Pricing Project and the I-205 Toll Project.

We also introduced the Statewide Toll Rulemaking Advisory Committee (STRAC) and shared updates on the Low-Income Toll Program. The STRAC aims to help ODOT build an easy-to-use, accessible, and equitable tolling program. To do this, the STRAC needs input from the community about topics like toll account enrollment, what discounts and exemptions will be available, and the process for data collection and enforcement. Learn more about the STRAC here.

Toll accounts: We shared that we are looking into multiple ways customers can register for an account and pay their toll bill, including with cash, in person, or by mail. We asked participants about the best ways to encourage community members to sign up for accounts.



Toll payment process: We shared ​ODOT's proposed process for collecting payments and asked participants how to make the process accessible and equitable. 



A full summary of the June meeting will be available on our project website. You can also read about topics addressed during the April meeting here

Community feedback will improve the Oregon Toll Program
We will share input from the June CBO discussion group with STRAC for consideration during their July meeting. The next community organization discussion group meeting is planned for late summer 2023. Here are additional ways community members can help us create a tolling program that works for our communities:
  • Join us for the next Statewide Toll Rulemaking Advisory Committee meeting! The STRAC will meet July 21, 9 a.m. – 12 p.m. Attend to learn more about discounts and exemptions for the Oregon Toll Program. Watch the YouTube livestream and view meeting materials on the project website.
  • Share your feedback. Send your comments to oregontollrules@odot.oregon.gov with “STRAC Public Comment" in the subject line.
Oregon Toll Program Summer Community Engagement

 Project staff talk through the details of the proposed northern I-205 toll gantry location.

We've started summer engagement off strong, as we've been visiting communities to talk about tolls and I-205 construction. So far this summer we've visited the Oregon City Fred Meyer, Lake Oswego Farmers Market, Happy Valley Oregon NeighborWalks, and Portland Sunday Parkways.

Community members have shared concerns about vehicles using local streets to avoid tolls on the highway, requests for more details about how ODOT will mitigate those local impacts, and questions about how ODOT will provide support for people experiencing low incomes.

We look forward to visiting with your communities and listening to your thoughts, questions, and concerns. The information and suggestions we hear help to inform next steps for the Oregon Toll Program.

Upcoming events in July we're attending include:
  • July 8 – Hillsboro Farmer's Market
  • July 12 – West Linn Adult Community Center
  • July 15 – Oregon City Farmer's Market
  • July 21 – City of Wood Village City Nite out
  • July 23 – Lents International Farmer's Market
  • July 27 – Portland Last Thursday (with Black United Fund of Oregon)
  • July 30 – Montavilla Street Fair
For a full list of the upcoming events, visit our project calendar.

ODOT receives national award for equitable engagement in the Toll Program

 Hannah Williams and Rebecca Steiner environmental planner with WSP at a podium accepting the NEPA Environmental Excellence Award for the Oregon Toll Program on May 8.

ODOT's Community Engagement Coordinator, Hannah Williams, recently accepted the National Association of Environmental Professionals' Environmental Excellence Award in the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) category for the Oregon Toll Program. This award reflects the equity assessment and equitable engagement work for the Oregon Toll Program.

This was a proud moment for the Toll Program team and a demonstration of ODOT's commitment to developing an equitable program.

“I'm inspired by the continued growth in this work over the last four years. We are so grateful for the help of our community-based organizations, community liaisons, and the Equity and Mobility Advisory Committee. Our current and future groundbreaking work is because of them," said Williams. The Equity Mobility Advisory Committee is made up of individuals with professional or lived experience in equity, who advise the toll program on how tolling can provide benefits for communities that have historically or are currently underrepresented or underserved by transportation projects.

Under the Urban Mobility Strategy, our tolling efforts aim to reduce congestion, improve safety and raise critical revenue to invest in Portland's infrastructure. While there are many teams involved in the effort to establish this toll program, Williams is a part of the team that has been leading community engagement efforts for the federally required environmental assessment process under NEPA. This team has worked hard to go beyond the requirements to ensure our toll program is equitable.

It was because of this focus on equity and engagement in the environmental assessment process that ODOT won the NAEP award for the Oregon Toll Program.

As a result of this engagement, our toll program will be the first in the nation to have a low-income toll program from the first day the tolls turn on. Oregon is committed to ensuring the toll program has discounts for our neighbors currently experiencing low incomes. To learn more about the low-income program, review the Low-Income Toll Report.

Mandy Putney, the Urban Mobility Office Strategic Initiatives Director who oversees the development of the toll projects, shared her pride for the team's work. “We've worked incredibly hard and I'm so proud of this team for their commitment to equity and community engagement," Putney said. “As we accept this award with gratitude, we also know there is more work to do, and we will continue to strive to improve our processes."

This summer, the toll program's community engagement team will be attending events throughout the Portland metropolitan area to listen and learn from the public. Working with the public and hearing their feedback is critical to helping ODOT achieve the toll program goals to reduce congestion and raise revenue for transportation investments that will make our roads and bridges safe and earthquake resilient.

Learn more about the Oregon Toll Program here: oregontolling.org.

This summer, talk with us about tolling!

​Listening and learning from local communities throughout the Portland metropolitan region is essential to building a better toll program, so we'll be hosting information tables at community events and gathering places throughout the summer. These conversations will help us make sure we are hearing from you, the people who know your communities the best. 

Governor Kotek recently directed the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) to delay the Oregon Toll Program's implementation of toll collection until January 2026. This summer, we will be visiting your community to hear from you and answer your questions about tolling.

Stop by one of our information tables this summer:
If there is an event you would like ODOT to join, please invite us by emailing: OregonTolling@odot.oregon.gov

Toll Committee News

​ The Regional Toll Advisory Committee will meet Monday, June 26, 9-11:30 a.m. Committee meetings provide a forum to provide feedback to ODOT leadership in advance of toll-related decisions. Public input is invited; learn more here.

​Tolling Delayed Until January 1, 2026​

Last week, we received a new directive from Governor Tina Kotek to delay the implementation of tolls until January 1, 2026. We appreciate the guidance of our elected leadership that our top priority should be to set this program up right. Implementing a modern toll program, for the first time in Oregon, requires extensive planning and community engagement. We see this new timeline as an opportunity to improve our public outreach and receive increased guidance and engagement with our partners and local communities.

As you'll see in this month's news, our work continues. We are working through the implications of this updated timeline and will provide more details when we can.

​Community voices shape tolling

Statewide Toll Rulemaking Advisory Committee members gather for their orientation meeting in January 2023.

As planning for the Oregon Toll Program continues, we're hearing questions about how toll accounts will work, and who will be able to sign up for a low-income discount. ODOT is bringing in the voice of the customer to help address these and other important questions about toll account enrollment, enforcement, and the low-income discount. Learn more about the Statewide Toll Rulemaking Advisory Committee's (STRAC) role on these topics and how we're gathering community feedback this summer.

ODOT is determining how customers will interact with and use the tolling system, which will be developed and outlined through rules that will apply to planned toll projects in the Portland metropolitan area. As a first step, ODOT selected 16 people from across the state to join the STRAC and advise on developing these rules. 

The STRAC will provide input on questions like:
  • How will customers enroll and pay?
  • What happens if a customer can't pay the toll?
  • What discounts and exemptions will be available?
  • How should toll rates be set and adjusted?
"As part of establishing tolling rules in Oregon, we ought to strive for an equitable balance to keep rates low, and so no group pays an outsized share."
-Sean Philbrook, STRAC
​About the STRAC

The STRAC aims to help ODOT build an easy-to-use, accessible, and equitable tolling program. STRAC members offer a wide range of professional and lived experiences to help create rules that reflect the needs and interests of all communities in Oregon. Members represent the interests of small businesses, rideshare programs, commuters, trucking and freight, equity and more. 

“While we know there are some downsides to tolling, it does provide motivation for travelers to consider travel options such as transit, carpooling and vanpooling which, in some cases, can provide cost effective, efficient and earth friendly alternatives to driving alone."
-Park Woodworth, STRAC

Several STRAC members serve on other tolling committees, including the Regional Toll Advisory Committee (RTAC) and the Equity and Mobility Advisory Committee (EMAC), and will serve as a bridge between committees to share relevant and important information. The STRAC has held four meetings to date and will continue to meet through November 2023. Once STRAC has completed its process, ODOT will share draft rules for public review and comment. Following a public comment period and public hearing, beginning in December 2023, ODOT will share draft rules with the Oregon Transportation Commission for a final decision in early 2024. Check out the STRAC Overview and Charter for more details.

What we've heard

To date, community members have shared the following ideas and suggestions with the STRAC about how tolling should be implemented. Key themes include:
  • Support for multiple options to set up and maintain toll accounts. Options could include online accounts, apps for mobile devices, cash-based options, and creating accounts through partnerships with community-based organizations.
  • Make enrollment easy to access and understand.
  • Address unique needs of large and small local businesses to support enrollment.
  • Provide community resources, such as translated information and assistance on how to pay tolls.
  • Consider incentives for pre-paying tolls, setting up online accounts, and ordering a transponder.
  • Questions about toll enforcement and what will happen if toll fees are not paid, or who will pay for fees if the driver is not the registered owner.
A summary of feedback received on toll operations is available here
​Future engagement

Community engagement for the rulemaking process will be closely coordinated with the Regional Mobility Pricing Project and the I-205 Toll Project. Here are ways we’re involving the community this summer and fall.

  • Equitable engagement. Over the next few months, we're hoping to meet with community-based organizations and historically and currently underserved communities, including Black/African American, Chinese, Vietnamese, Latinx, Russian, BIPOC, Native American, people with disabilities, and youth to invite feedback to inform rules. Stay tuned to hear more about what we learn.
  • Talk with us! This summer, we'll host information booths at community festivals and gathering places to answer questions and hear ideas from community members about enrollment, enforcement, and the low-income discount. Visit our website in the coming months to learn more about upcoming events.
  • Join us for the next meeting on May 26 from 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. to learn more about enrollment and enforcement for the Oregon Toll Program. Watch the YouTube livestream and view meeting materials on the project website.
  • To shareoregontollrules@odot.oregon.gov  your feedback, email with “STRAC Public Comment" in the subject line.
"It's important for employers of all sizes from both banks of the river to weigh in on tolling rules so we can ensure a reliable, efficient, and competitive transportation network -- one that serves our workers, freight, students and visitors for generations to come."
-Sean Philbrook, STRAC
​I-205 Toll Project Environmental Assessment comment period complete

Thank you for your participation! The I-205 Toll Project closed a 60-day public comment period that spanned from February 21 to April 21, 2023. We received more than 2,600 comments from across the region! 

The next step in the environmental process is for ODOT and FHWA to consider comments on the Environmental Assessment. ODOT and FHWA will prepare responses to substantive comments. Once the comment review and results of any additional analysis have been considered, FHWA will determine whether the project requires an Environmental Impact Statement, or the project's effects warrant a Finding of No Significant Impact. Stay tuned for ongoing project updates.

Community organizations join ODOT to talk tolls

ODOT is committed to minimizing burdens and maximizing benefits to communities that transportation projects have historically excluded and underserved. We are working to engage these communities so that we can intentionally inform, listen to, learn from, and empower them throughout the toll projects' development, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation processes.

To connect with underrepresented and underserved communities we've partnered with local community organizations on a series of discussion groups. Our most recent discussion on Thursday, March 23 included representatives from 13 organizations across the greater Portland area, including organizations that serve the Black, Latina and Muslim communities, local food banks, non-motorized transportation organizations. Community representatives are compensated for their time and participation.

We were also joined by representatives from the three committees advising ODOT on tolling implementation: Equity & Mobility Advisory CommitteeStatewide Toll Rulemaking Advisory Committee, and the Regional Toll Advisory Committee.

Our most recent discussion group was led by Erika McCalpine, ODOT's Assistant Director for the Office of Equity and Civil Rights.

What we shared; what we heard
During the meeting, we shared our latest plans for implementing a tolling system in the greater Portland area, including our latest information about a low-income toll program and how we're collaborating with community organizations and local neighbors on options for future toll accounts.

In addition, we also shared in-depth details about the I-205 Toll Project Environmental Assessment, currently open for public review and comment until Friday, April 21.

Community organization representatives were very interested in qualifications for and implementation of the low-income toll program, including advising ODOT to lower barriers to participation in this program and try to ensure it will be as accessible as possible when tolling launches on I-205. There were specific questions around how ODOT would provide access for people without bank accounts, what toll payments systems will look like, and requests for more details about who specifically would qualify for the program.

In response, we confirmed that there will be a low-income program on day one of tolling. While the toll discount amount has not been decided, ODOT is prioritizing researching a toll discount for households with incomes at or below 200% of the federal poverty level. We are also reviewing a verification process that leverages existing programs and explores options for self-certification.

The next steps for the low-income toll program will be discussed as part of the Statewide Toll Rulemaking Advisory Committee process later this year, which will cover customer accounts, payments, civil penalties, fees, and disputes, low-income discounts, vehicle rates and exemptions, and general rate structure and schedule.

Regarding the I-205 Toll Project, community organization representatives asked questions about the timeline to begin tolls and build project improvements, how ODOT is helping drivers consider alternatives to driving alone, and how ODOT is planning to address drivers who choose to reroute from I-205 into local neighborhoods when tolls begin.

We shared additional details about the I-205 project, including expected safety and travel time improvements, and the ways that ODOT is working with local jurisdictions to plan mitigation for rerouting from I-205. We also pointed meeting attendees to the I-205 Toll Project Environmental Assessment websitevideos and interactive map for additional details on how we're planning for tolling on I-205. 

Erika McCalpine closed the meeting by acknowledging the historical harm ODOT has caused by not getting community feedback before implementing projects and programs that impact peoples' lives. She thanked participants for showing up and emphasized how much ODOT values their feedback. She ended with a reminder that there will be future meetings to answer more questions and go in-depth about the low-income toll program after it's finalized by the Oregon Transportation Commission.

The next community organization discussion group meeting is planned for late spring 2023.

A full summary of the meeting will be available on our project website.

Reminder: Share your input on I-205!

The I-205 Toll Project Environmental Assessment public comment period is open through April 21

The I-205 Toll Project Environmental Assessment public comment period is open! You are invited to review materials that identify the potential short- and long-term effects of the project, along with possible solutions to address negative effects. The 60-day public comment period began February 21, 2023 and closes April 21, 2023, 4:00 p.m.

Thank you to everyone who joined ODOT's public webinars on the I-205 Toll Project Environmental Assessment. We appreciated the opportunity to share information about tolling on I-205, the findings of the environmental analysis, and how to comment during the 60-day public comment period. 

Watch the webinar recordings from March 14 or March 16 to learn about the project and hear answers to some common questions. Webinar recordings are also available in Cantonese, Mandarin, Spanish, Russian, and Vietnamese.

We also appreciate those who attended the project's virtual public hearing and in-person commenting opportunity on April 4.

Find out More

Read the report. Read the Environmental Assessment, appendices, technical reports and a multi-lingual summary fact sheet. In addition, an interactive map shows the effects at studied intersections and corridors.

Watch our video series. We also have a series of short videos about the report and findings here. Closed captions can be accessed in multiple languages.

Join us in person. We're sharing information and have project staff available to answer your questions at information tables in the area. At these events, attendees can review project materials, ask questions, and provide written comments about the Environmental Assessment. Visit our calendar of events at OregonTolling.org for a complete list locations and times.​

Details on how to provide your feedback:

Submit comments in the way that works best for you by 4 p.m. on Friday, April 21, 2023:

  • Electronic comments: If you wish to submit an official comment on the I-205 Toll Project Environmental Assessment electronically, please use this multi-lingual online comment form. If your comment includes an attachment, you may email it to I205TollEA@odot.oregon.gov with “EA comments" in the subject line. All comments must be submitted by April 21, 2023, 4:00 p.m. to be considered.
  • Mail: Oregon Department of Transportation
  • Attn: I-205 EA Comment ODOT Urban Mobility Office
  • 18277 SW Boones Ferry Road, Tualatin, OR 97224
  • Voicemail: Call 503-837-3536 and leave a voicemail message.

All comments will be reviewed and will inform the Environmental Assessment and next steps. We will continue to provide ongoing project updates and opportunities for involvement.

Reporting Back to the Community

We want a future where travelers in and around Portland can count on a safe, predictable trip, anytime of day. An important tool is congestion pricing on I-5 and I-205. Your comments on the plans are making a difference to shape the outcome.

Thank you to everyone who provided input during our recent engagement period for the Regional Mobility Pricing Project!  Find out what we learned from nearly 4,500 comments by reading the Engagement and Comment Summary and how we'll use this feedback as the project moves forward. Project staff engaged and heard from thousands of community members at the beginning of the environmental analysis for the Regional Mobility Pricing Project, called “scoping."

Key activities during the scoping period included:


What we heard
During our recent engagement efforts we heard from nearly 4,500 people and organizations from Oregon and Washington. The majority of feedback illustrated that there are a lot of questions and concerns about the proposed project and its potential impacts, as well as how congestion pricing would work in the region.

“We heard that the community wants to know what congestion pricing would mean for their daily travel and how it would affect them and the region," said Mandy Putney, ODOT Strategic Initiatives Director. “We're taking this input into account as we begin an analysis of the project's benefits and impacts and are committed to more engagement to answer community questions."

Commenters most frequently focused on issues related to:
  • Concerns about the effectiveness of congestion pricing to reduce congestion and raise revenue. This is similar to other places around the country where community support was initially low, however it improved once people experienced more predictable trips as a result of tolling.
  • Potential impacts to local communities from traffic rerouting off I-5 and I-205.
  • Financial and economic impacts from congestion pricing, particularly for people experiencing low incomes.
  • Questions about the need for, and plans to use, toll revenue.
Commenters also offered suggested changes to the proposed project. ODOT is currently studying congestion pricing on all lanes, instead of a single express lane, to provide congestion relief and keep costs lower for all drivers. Some commenters requested a toll-free lane in addition to tolled lanes, and to consider tolling key locations on I-5 and I-205 rather than tolling the entire lengths of these roadways. Some commenters also wanted the project to be focused on reducing vehicle miles traveled and managing travel demand.

Please review the Engagement and Comment Summary for a more detailed summary. 
How we'll use feedback​
Here is how we are moving ahead:
  • Addressing input from commenters by making specific changes to the project's Draft Purpose and Need Statement, Proposed Action, and methods for how to study community and environmental topics in the environmental analysis. Review the Executive Summary to learn more.
  • Talking with community members and sharing responses to questions and concerns beginning this summer. This will include more information about how congestion pricing would work, how ODOT will address community concerns in the environmental analysis, and how to get involved as the project moves forward.
  • Analyzing the effects of the proposed project and publishing the results for review and comment in an Environmental Assessment, expected in late 2023. Solutions, or mitigations, will be proposed as needed to address impacts.
Learn more about how we've considered input to date here.

ODOT will continue to share project updates and provide opportunities for feedback. Visit our website for project updates and ways to get involved at www.oregontolling.org.

I-205 Toll Report comment period extended two weeks



Watch I-205 Toll Report Environmental Assessment videos to learn more.

I-205 Toll Project Environmental Assessment open to public comment through April 21

The I-205 Toll Project Environmental Assessment public comment period has been extended through April 21. The extension gives partners and community members more time to review the materials that identify the potential short- and long-term effects of the project, along with possible solutions to address negative effects.

The 60-day public comment period opened on February 21, 2023, and will close on April 21, 2023, 4:00 p.m. During this time, the Oregon Department of Transportation and the Federal Highway Administration are inviting feedback on the Environmental Assessment and associated technical reports.

I-205 Toll Project benefits

  • Funds seismic improvements to eight bridges on I-205 from Stafford Road to OR 213. As part of a separate project, construction is already underway to make the Abernethy Bridge the first earthquake-ready highway bridge across the Willamette River in the Portland metropolitan area.
  • Adds the missing third travel lane in a 7-mile stretch from Stafford Road to the Abernethy Bridge. Upgrading this section to three lanes, similar to the rest of I-205, will increase safety and reduce bottlenecks.
  • Makes travel times up to 50% faster in the afternoon.
  • Generates revenue to fund the 7 miles of improvements with congestion pricing through variable-rate tolls at the Abernethy and Tualatin River bridges, beginning in late 2024 at the earliest.
Together, tolling and the improvements on I-205 will reduce congestion to give travelers a more predictable and safer trip. Without tolls and planned improvements, I-205 will see daily congestion increase to 14 hours per day by 2045 as the region's population grows. Diversion to local streets, which is already an issue near the I-205 corridor, will also increase. However, with corridor improvements and tolling, congestion on I-205 would be reduced to two hours or less per day in 2045, and there would be 26% fewer crashes.

Ways to learn more

Attend a webinar. We will be hosting two public webinars online or by phone where you can learn more about congestion pricing through variable rate tolls and what it means for our region. Sign and language interpretation will be available.

Read the report. Read the Environmental Assessment, appendices, technical reports and a multi-lingual summary fact sheet. In addition, an interactive map shows the effects at studied intersections and corridors.

Watch our video series. We also have a series of short videos about the report and findings here. Closed captions can be accessed in multiple languages.

Join us in person. We'll share information and have project staff available to answer your questions at information tables. At these events, attendees can review project materials, ask questions, and provide written comments about the Environmental Assessment. Visit OregonTolling.org for a complete list locations and times.

Details on how to provide your feedback:

Submit comments in the way that works best for you by 4 p.m. on Friday, April 21, 2023:

  • Electronic comments: If you wish to submit an official comment on the I-205 Toll Project Environmental Assessment electronically, please use this multi-lingual online comment form. If your comment includes an attachment, you may email it to I205TollEA@odot.oregon.gov with “EA comments" in the subject line. All comments must be submitted by April 21, 2023, 4:00 p.m. to be considered.
  • Public hearing: We will host an online public hearing on Tuesday, April 4, 3-6 p.m. where attendees may provide verbal comments on the Environmental Assessment. The hearing will be hosted on Zoom.
  • Verbal comments: Call 503-837-3536 to leave a comment via voicemail. We will also provide an opportunity for you to provide a verbal comment in-person on April 4, 3-6 p.m.at Pioneer Community Center, 615 5th St, Oregon City.
  • Mail: Oregon Department of Transportation
    Attn: Mandy Putney ODOT Urban Mobility Office
    18277 SW Boones Ferry Road, Tualatin, OR 97224

All comments will be reviewed and will inform the Environmental Assessment and next steps. We will continue to provide ongoing project updates and opportunities for involvement.

Interstate 205 Toll Report Open to Public Comment through April 21 

Watch video: “Project Overview" to learn more the I-205 Toll Project Environmental Assessment.

new report on the I-205 Toll Project is open for public comment today through 4 p.m. on Friday, April 21. Published by the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) and the Federal Highway Administration, the Environmental Assessment identifies potential short- and long-term effects of the project on the transportation system, local communities, the economy and the environment, along with possible solutions to address negative effects.

I-205 Toll Project benefits

  • Funds seismic improvements to eight bridges on I-205 from Stafford Road to OR 213. As part of a separate project, construction is already underway to make the Abernethy Bridge the first earthquake-ready highway bridge across the Willamette River in the Portland metropolitan area.
  • Adds the missing third travel lane in a 7-mile stretch from Stafford Road to the Abernethy Bridge. Upgrading this section to three lanes, similar to the rest of I-205, will increase safety and reduce bottlenecks.
  • Makes 50% faster travel times.
  • Generates revenue to fund the 7 miles of improvements with congestion pricing through variable-rate tolls at the Abernethy and Tualatin River bridges, beginning in late 2024 at the earliest.

Together, tolling and the improvements on I-205 will reduce congestion to give travelers a more predictable and safer trip.

“We know that people in Clackamas County, and throughout the region, are frustrated by the current congestion on I-205," said Mandy Putney, director of Strategic Initiatives for ODOT's Urban Mobility Office. “Tolling will be a big change for everyone, but it's a necessary step to address congestion and fund much-needed safety improvements to I-205. We believe when completed, people who live, work and travel through Clackamas County will see the value of these major community investments with safer, quicker trips."

Without tolls and planned improvements, I-205 will see daily congestion increase to 14 hours per day by 2045 as the region's population grows. Diversion to local streets, which is already an issue near the I-205 corridor, will also increase. However, with corridor improvements and tolling, congestion on I-205 would be reduced to two hours or less per day in 2045, and there would be nearly 20% fewer crashes.

Local partnerships are critical

In addition to making improvements on I-205, ODOT is collaborating with local jurisdictions to plan targeted, local road investments that help address concerns around adding tolls on I-205, including diversion to local roads.

We are planning a variety of transportation mitigation and improvement projects throughout Oregon City, Tualatin, Lake Oswego, West Linn and Canby, which include adding transit signal priority projects, widening sidewalks, improving signalized pedestrian crossings, providing roundabouts, and adding crosswalks.

We have hosted more than 100 briefings, presentations and events in the Clackamas County community since 2018, and we will continue collaborating with project-area jurisdictions and agencies to refine these local transportation and safety investments.

I-205 tolls will vary throughout the day on a set schedule

Congestion pricing through variable rate tolls provides more predictable travel times. There will be a set schedule of toll rates to charge drivers a higher price during peak traffic periods at congested locations and lower toll rates during non-peak hours when there is less traffic. It also means drivers will know the prices before heading out.

Congestion pricing will also:

  • Increase safety with fewer traffic jams. 
  • Improve the statewide flow of goods to and from market and benefit local business districts.
  • Provide revenue to preserve and improve I-205.
  • Reduce carbon emissions to support reaching the state's climate goals.

Developing an equity-informed toll program

We are committed to creating better transportation solutions for historically and currently excluded and underserved communities. As part of that commitment, we formed the Equity and Mobility Advisory Committee (EMAC), made up of leaders from community-based organizations and underserved communities, to advise the Oregon Transportation Commission and us on creating an equitable tolling program. With EMAC's support and vision, we developed an “equity framework" with principles and steps to guide the project's planning process. As part of this commitment, we are developing a low-income toll program that will provide discounts to low-income drivers.

Where we are in the process

The Environmental Assessment is a component of our coordination with the Federal Highway Administration required by the National Environmental Policy Act. We launched this process for the I-205 Toll Project in 2020, when we received more than 4,600 comments from the greater metropolitan Portland community about adding tolls to I-205. Thousands of public comments and dozens of community conversations have informed our work to date.

For example, in response to community feedback, we are analyzing a toll discounts for people making up to 400% of the federal poverty level. We are also working with local jurisdictions to minimize impacts from drivers rerouting from I-205. And we are directing toll revenue from the Abernethy and Tualatin River bridges to fund improvements on I-205.

Later this year, we will publish a Revised Environmental Assessment based on public input.

Project study area – the area where ODOT is making improvements. Potential toll gantry – Toll collection points at the Abernethy and Tualatin River bridges.

ODOT's regional tolling program

The other proposed tolls in the Portland area include the Regional Mobility Pricing Project and the Interstate Bridge Replacement Project on the Columbia River. Each of these projects is undergoing a separate environmental review under the National Environmental Policy Act and will have opportunities for public comment. Tolling is part of our long-term strategy to reduce traffic congestion, fund bottleneck-relief projects, reduce carbon emissions and sustainably raise revenue for transportation investments for generations to come. Toll revenues will help preserve and improve roads and fund upgrades to withstand a major earthquake. 

Ways to learn more and provide comments

  • Attend a webinar. We will be hosting two public webinars online or by phone where you can learn more about congestion pricing through variable rate tolls and what it means for our region.
  • Public hearing (virtual, with concurrent in-person opportunity for oral comment to a court reporter)
    • Tuesday, April 4, 3-6 p.m.
  • Read the report. Read the Environmental Assessment, appendices, technical reports and a summary fact sheet. In addition, an interactive map shows the effects at studied intersections and corridors. An example of an affected intersection is South End Road and 99E, where we are planning to add a traffic signal to improve traffic flow and reduce crashes.
  • View a video. We also have a series of short videos about the report and findings here.
  • Join us in person. We'll share information and have project staff available to answer your questions at upcoming community drop-in sessions. At these events, attendees can review project materials, ask questions, and provide written comments about the Environmental Assessment. Visit OregonTolling.org for a complete list of drop-in locations and times.

Details on how to provide your feedback:

​Submit comments in the way that works best for you by 4 p.m. on Friday, April 21, 2023:

Email: I205TollEA@odot.oregon.gov. Please include “EA comments" in the subject line.

Phone: 503-837-3536

Mail: Oregon Department of Transportation

Attn: Mandy Putney ODOT Urban Mobility Office 18277 SW Boones Ferry Road Tualatin, OR 97224

All comments will be reviewed and will inform the Environmental Assessment and next steps. We will continue to provide ongoing project updates and opportunities for involvement.

Other Tolling News

  • Thank you for your participation! The Regional Mobility Pricing Project has started the environmental review phase under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). We recently completed a 50-day public comment period from November 18, 2022 to January 6, 2023 to inform the environmental analysis for the Regional Mobility Pricing Project. Public webinars were held on November 29 and 30, 2022 – you can watch recordings of the livestreams here. We received over 4,500 comments from across the region. All comments on these materials will be reviewed and summarized. We anticipate sharing this comment summary later this year. We'll continue to provide ongoing project updates and opportunities for involvement throughout the environmental analysis.

  • The Regional Toll Advisory Committee will meet Monday, February 27 at 9 a.m. Committee meetings provide a forum to provide feedback to ODOT leadership in advance of toll-related decisions. Public input is invited; learn more here
​Answering Your Questions about Tolling on I-5 and I-205

 Project staff answered questions from community members at public webinars for the Regional Mobility Pricing Project.

Thank you to everyone who joined ODOT's November webinars for the Regional Mobility Pricing Project. We appreciated the opportunity to share information about tolling on I-5 and I-205, the upcoming environmental analysis to identify the project's potential benefits and impacts, and how to comment during a 50-day public comment period. 

Project staff responded to many questions on topics like:
  • Ways we'll analyze and monitor potential rerouting on local streets and neighborhood impacts
  • How toll equipment and toll payment would work
  • Considerations for low-income toll discounts
  • Oregon's transportation funding shortfall
  • How public feedback will inform the project and environmental analysis
Watch the webinar recordings from November 29 or November 30 to learn about the project and hear answers to some common questions. Learn more about the project, the public comment period, and share your comments here by January 6.

Toll Committee News
  • The Regional Toll Advisory Committee will meet January 23, 9-11:30 a.m. Committee meetings provide a forum to provide feedback to ODOT leadership in advance of toll-related decisions. Public input is invited; learn more here

Workshops lead to local road improvements benefiting Clackamas County communities

Bike and pedestrian investments and other transportation solutions will be included as part of improvements and tolling on I-205.

ODOT is studying the benefits and impacts of adding the missing third lane and making seismic improvements to bridges on I-205 between Stafford Road and OR 213 in Clackamas County.

Variable rate tolls on the Abernethy and Tualatin River Bridges will pay for those improvements, help ODOT make new investments in local roads, and reduce traffic congestion.

The benefits and impacts of the proposed improvements and tolling on I-205 will be published in a report called an Environmental Assessment. This process is required by the federal government to determine whether the project could cause impacts to the environment.

Combined, improvements and tolling will address seismic needs, bottlenecks, traffic delays, and safety on this 7-mile stretch of I-205 and nearby local roads. If we do nothing, traffic congestion, travel times, and crashes on I-205 and nearby areas will continue to get worse. Right now, traffic in this area is 7 hours daily, and is forecasted to increase to 14 hours without the improvements or tolling. With planned corridor improvements and tolling, congestion on some areas of I-205 would be reduced to 2 hours or less per day.

Local communities are helping to identify solutions for new transportation issues related to tolling. 

ODOT is collaborating with local governments to identify investments in local communities that will address potential negative impacts resulting from drivers trying to avoid tolls by rerouting to local streets. Even today, local communities are already seeing traffic on local roads as cars reroute from the interstate due to heavy congestion.

In late summer 2022, ODOT, along with the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), cohosted four workshops with representatives from local governments to talk about additional improvements and solutions to new transportation issues in communities along I-205. These improvements and solutions, called “mitigation," are an important part of the project and help make tolling work for everyone. Any mitigation developed with local communities and ODOT is required in order for tolling to move forward.

Discussions at the workshops revolved around collecting direct input and feedback on potential mitigation solutions and projects that might affect the analysis done in the Environmental Assessment. Our local partners were able to provide us with important context about travel conditions, challenges, and opportunities that helped influence the way mitigation solutions could work. 

Based on feedback received at the workshops, ODOT developed a diverse package of improvements and solutions to transportation issues in communities along I-205. Some potential fixes identified at the workshops include:
  • Changing roadway striping and lane configurations
  • Adding roundabouts and new or modified traffic signals
  • Providing priority for buses on certain streets
  • Improving sidewalks and walkways
  • Ongoing monitoring of the transportation system to identify issues as they arise​


Local government staff from Tualatin, Rivergrove, TriMet, SMART, Clackamas County and Washington County collaborating with ODOT and FHWA on proposed transportation improvements at a recent workshop.

Workshop attendees included technical and policy experts from the project team, and traffic engineering, transportation planning, and policy professionals from 16 local governments and agencies. Communities and agencies who attended the workshops with ODOT and FHWA included:
  • Meeting 1: Canby, Canby Area Transit, Clackamas County
  • Meeting 2: Oregon City, TriMet, Clackamas County
  • Meeting 3: Tualatin, Rivergrove, TriMet, SMART, Clackamas County, Washington County
  • Meeting 4: Lake Oswego, West Linn, Clackamas County, TriMet

Collaborating with local communities in the I-205 area is essential to building a better improvements and tolling project on I-205. This collaboration will ensure we are investing into local communities, reflecting community priorities, and addressing community concerns. 

The workshops and follow-up meetings were collaborative conversations with our community partners. ODOT and FHWA are working with local communities, taking their input, and incorporating their suggestions into the draft report before it is published.

RMPP Scoping Comment Period banner

Public Comment Period is now open through Friday, Jan. 6, 2023

  • Make your voice heard: Share your feedback during the public comment period to inform a study of congestion pricing on I-5 and I-205. Congestion pricing, using variable rate tolls, is a key tool to reduce traffic congestion and make travel safer and more predictable in the Portland metropolitan area.

Tolling in Oregon – The more you know!

One component of ODOT's Urban Mobility Strategy is to reduce traffic along our highways by implementing congestion pricing with variable rate tolls. ODOT began studying congestion pricing tolls in 2017, and current plans are to start tolling in late 2024. Congestion pricing, also known as “variable rate tolling" – decreases the number of people using the highway at the most congested times, reduces stop-and-go traffic, and provides a more predictable trip at rush hours.

We want to continue to provide information about the system we're planning. ODOT is sharing information through newsletters, in the press, on social media and our website. If you have additional questions, please feel free to reach out! We always appreciate hearing from you.

Did you know: Congestion pricing is among our best options to reduce traffic in the greater Portland area

The greater Portland region is ranked 11th worst in the United States for traffic, according to the 2021 INRIX Global Traffic Scorecard, and our population is expected to grow 23% by 2040. In fact, our outdated system and traffic delays cost our economy $1.2 million per day, according to our 2020 Traffic Performance Report.

Our traffic challenges are only getting worse, and existing traffic management tools and planned investments are not enough. Widening the interstates or building alternate routes are incredibly costly.                          

By implementing congestion pricing, Oregon is better positioned to reach our climate change goals, support the movement of freight, and improve quality of life for Oregonians. Congestion pricing is a sustainable way to use roadway capacity most efficiently, leading to more predictable trips, addressing traffic congestion in the metro region, funding strategic bottleneck-relief projects, and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Congestion pricing would be done alongside investments in transit, bicycle, and pedestrian facilities. 

Did you know: Oregon's transportation budget falls short to address infrastructure needs

Oregon faces a $510 million maintenance shortfall – each year. Construction costs have increased due to inflation with material costs jumping 20% last year. Vehicles are becoming more fuel efficient or not relying on gasoline at all, which is great for our climate but means people are paying less in gas taxes, which is our primary tool to fund highway maintenance.

We don't have enough funding to maintain the system in a state of good repair, address earthquake risks, and fix areas with high crash rates to increase safety. As our state's population grows, we'll continue to see even more congestion and problems on the interstates. We have an interconnected system and we need solutions that work together.

In 2017, House Bill 2017 directed ODOT to use tolls to help fund transportation improvements. The Oregon Constitution (Article IX, Section 3a) specifies that revenues collected from the use or operation of motor vehicles is spent on roadway projects, which could include the construction or reconstruction of travel lanes, as well as bicycle and pedestrian facilities or transit improvements in or along the roadway.

Did you know: We are creating solutions for people who use local roads

Due to the heavy traffic on the interstate, local communities are already experiencing more traffic on local roads, as cars reroute to save time.

In general, congestion pricing improves traffic and gets you a faster, more predictable trip – you'll know the time your trip will take. Less congestion means fewer crashes and improved safety.

Rerouting onto local streets to avoid a backed-up interstate already happens, and we know some people will choose to avoid the toll and drive through local roads. We've been collaborating with local governments to address the potential negative impacts from drivers avoiding tolls and rerouting to local streets.

We've already identified some early fixes – called “mitigation." Ideas include adding roundabouts and new or modified traffic signals and improving sidewalks and walkways.

We'll provide more updates on mitigation planning in the coming months. ODOT will pay for mitigation projects we and our local partners determine are necessary to manage negative impacts from I-205 tolls.

Did you know: We are developing a low-income toll program

Toll rates are not finalized and will be set by the Oregon Transportation Commission about six months before tolling begins. Toll rates and related policies will be determined after continued technical studies and upcoming ongoing public and future feedback opportunities.

All vehicles – including electric vehicles and hybrids – will be charged a toll.

We are currently in the process of finalizing a low-income toll program, which may include discounts or exemptions for certain drivers. This program has been a multi-year collaboration with ODOT's Equity and Mobility Advisory Committee, which is composed of community members and stakeholders from across the region. Stay tuned for more details on this program as it moves forward.

Did you know: Local businesses and the broader region can expect to see economic benefits from I-205 tolling

As some drivers choose different travel routes, our studies show that consumer spending is likely to increase at local shops and restaurants, especially through portions of Canby, West Linn and Oregon City.

There are regional economic benefits from tolling too. For example, project construction would lead to additional jobs and purchasing of supplies and materials in the Portland metropolitan region.

In the longer term, the regional economy will benefit from more reliable freight deliveries and safer highways. By 2045, highway improvements and tolling are expected to result in millions of dollars per year in savings and benefits to the regional economy.

Share your feedback!Engagement Icon

We're working to reduce traffic jams and make your trip more reliable and safer. Help us improve mobility through the Portland metropolitan area by participating in the three comment periods below.

I-5 Rose Quarter Improvement Project

Regional Mobility Pricing Project

  • Learn more and share your voice! Give input to inform an upcoming study about tolling I-5 and I-205 to reduce traffic congestion and make travel times more predictable through the Portland metropolitan area. Review information and comment here by Jan. 6, 2023.

I-205 Toll Project

  • Coming soon! Review and comment on the formal environmental review document in early 2023. Stay up to date and learn more here about the proposed project to add a third lane and provide seismic improvements to bridges on I-205 from Stafford Road to OR 213, and toll the Abernethy and Tualatin River Bridges.
​See What All-Electronic Tolling Looks Like


All-electronic tolling saves time for travelers, and you never have to stop. 

Modern tolling is new for Oregon and many decisions still need to be made. Watch our short video to see what an all-electronic tolling system could look like on I-5 and I-205 – with no toll booths, and no stopping or slowing. 

Public Comment Period
  • Make your voice heard: Learn more and share your feedback during the public comment period to study congestion pricing, using variable rate tolls, on I-5 and I-205 to reduce traffic in the Portland metropolitan area. Beginning tomorrow, Friday, November 18 through Friday, January 6. 

Join a webinar: We will share information and answer questions about the proposed concept for tolling I-5 and I-205, issues that will be studied, how to comment, and next steps at two webinars.

  • Webinar # 1 – Tuesday, Nov. 29, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Click this link to join the Zoom Webinar. Telephone dial in by phone: +1 346 248 7799 Webinar ID: 824 4095 7204
  • Webinar # 2 – Wednesday, Nov. 30, 4-5 p.m. Click this link to join the Zoom Webinar. Telephone dial in by phone: +1 719 359 4580 Webinar ID: 861 6446 4157
​Toll Committee News
  • The Regional Toll Advisory Committee will meet Monday, Dec. 5, 9-11:30 a.m. Committee meetings provide a forum to provide feedback to ODOT leadership in advance of toll-related decisions. Public input is invited; learn more here.
  • The Equity and Mobility Advisory Committee will meet Wednesday, Dec. 7, 3-5 p.m. Meeting details are available here.
Identifying Toll Discount Options for People Experiencing Low Incomes
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ODOT is committed to providing a low-income toll program the first day tolling begins. As a first step, ODOT, with guidance from the Equity and Mobility Advisory Committee (EMAC), issued a Low-Income Toll Report in September 2022 to describe an approach for developing a low-income toll program. The report identifies equitable solutions for people who are less able to pay a toll, including discount options for specific income levels. It also explores different discount types (e.g., toll discount, toll credits, free trips) and methods for accessible enrollment and income verification.

ODOT developed the report at the direction of the Oregon Legislature to address the concern that the cost of paying a toll will be a burden for people experiencing low incomes. The Oregon Transportation Commission, as the state's toll authority, will use input from EMAC, public engagement, ODOT's technical analysis, and the Statewide Toll Rulemaking Advisory Committee to make decisions about the low-income toll program. Learn more by reviewing the report here.

I-205 Toll and Improvements Study Results Coming This Fall – Learn What We Found


ODOT is currently studying the benefits and impacts of adding the missing third lane on I-205 between Stafford Road and OR 213, and tolling the Abernethy and Tualatin River Bridges. Results from this study will be released this fall in a draft report called an “Environmental Assessment”. This study will include effects to travel times on I-205, traffic on surrounding local streets and the economy, among others.

  • Improvements and tolling will reduce I-205 congestion. Drivers would see a 50% decrease in afternoon travel time and a 25% decrease in the morning on I-205. According to our study results, without improvements to I-205 between OR 213 and Stafford Road, and without tolling on the Abernethy and Tualatin River Bridges, traffic on I-205 by 2045 would result in 14 daily hours of total congestion and an increase in crashes in this region.
  • Tolling and improving I-205 will cause some travelers to choose other routes. While rerouting from the highway to the local streets is already happening today, a few local roads are predicted to see more congestion at peak times compared to future conditions without tolling and widening. Other local routes will be improved or unchanged. ODOT is collaborating with local governments to come up with solutions that will reduce the effects of rerouting.
  • ODOT is using $0.60 to $2.20 per bridge as estimated toll rates for the environmental study. The Oregon Transportation Commission will set toll rates in 2024. Separately, a low-income toll program, which may include discounts or exemptions, is under consideration.
  • Freight travel times on I-205 are projected to improve in both northbound and southbound directions, to meet critical delivery deadlines. Businesses rely on I-205 to move their goods and services.
  • Adding the third lane from Stafford Road to OR 213 and tolling the Abernethy and Tualatin River Bridges will encourage slightly fewer single-occupancy vehicle trips. More than one person in a car will lower travel costs compared to one person in a car paying the full toll. Tolling can also help reduce greenhouse gas emissions by encouraging carpooling and alternative modes of transportation, reduced congestion and associated car idling.
The I-205 Toll Project would add a third lane and provide seismic improvements to bridges on I-205 from Stafford Road to OR 213, and toll the Abernethy and Tualatin River Bridges. Together, the I-205 improvements and tolls will reduce congestion to give travelers a better and more reliable trip. Construction is underway on the first phase of improvements to make the Abernethy Bridge the first earthquake-ready highway bridge across the Willamette River.  

Without tolls and planned roadway upgrades, daily congestion on I-205 will continue to grow up to 14 hours per day by 2045 as more people use the highway. Diversion to local streets will also increase when the interstate has stop-and-go traffic. With the planned project, congestion on I-205 would be about 2 hours per day in 2045. 

The full environmental study is almost complete! The Environmental Assessment will be available for public review and comment in late fall 2022. Tolls could begin on I-205 as early as the end of 2024.

We're using computer models to predict what will happen to traffic on the tolled highway as well as surrounding local roads. 


 

Watch: How will tolls affect traffic?

Overall, research shows that tolled interstates provide more reliable trips with reduced travel time.
*Experience from other cities shows congestion pricing improves traffic – April 2022 edition of the newsletter.

Hear directly from us. Last month, ODOT hosted several briefings and workshops in Clackamas County to present early findings and discuss potential strategies to address negative impacts. We are continuing to host or attend briefings to share results and answer questions. Request a presentation to your organization by contacting the project team.

Join the Statewide Toll Rulemaking Advisory Committee


ODOT is seeking 10-15 individuals to serve on our Statewide Toll Rulemaking Advisory Committee (STRAC) for approximately 8-12 months. The committee would begin later this fall and will help develop Oregon Administrative Rules that determine how toll rates are set and how customers interact with the toll system. Check out the STRAC Overview and draft schedule for more details. Interested people will need to complete an online application by clicking here to complete a quick questionnaire. 

Oregon Transportation Commission supports and appreciates July 2022 recommendations from Equity and Mobility Advisory Committee


EMAC members EMAC deliberated on its final set of recommendations for the Oregon Transportation Commission at their June 22, 2022 meeting.

On July 14, the Oregon Transportation Commission (OTC) supported the Equity and Mobility Advisory Committee's (EMAC's) July 2022 Recommendations as strategic direction for Oregon toll projects. EMAC developed its recommendations to advance equity for Oregon toll projects following a two-year process. The recommendations offer equitable solutions across many different approaches.

​The process of developing these recommendations took shape in 2021 as the EMAC created its Foundational Statements, which served as building blocks and provided high-level consensus between the EMAC, ODOT staff and OTC. Throughout 2022, the EMAC developed the recommendations over a series of meetings and solicited public feedback through an online survey and discussion groups with diverse audiences. In June 2022, the EMAC deliberated on its final set of July 2022 recommendations for committee-wide support ahead of the OTC discussion.

​Each of the recommendations pulls from the Foundational Statements and offers equitable solutions across different critical areas. The recommendations focus on:

  • Congestion management approaches and recommended actions to balance key goals. These goals include improving mobility, advancing climate goals, and providing benefits for and avoiding disproportionate burdens to communities identified in the Oregon Toll Program's Equity Framework.
  • revenue generation approach and considerations for toll discounts and credits that reduce the burden of tolling on those experiencing financial hardship.  Additionally, the need for a toll rate schedule that emphasizes managing transportation demand and advancing equity.
  • Business investment strategies to increase opportunities for contracting with disadvantaged business enterprises, minority, and women-owned businesses:
    • Involving community-based organizations that serve communities identified in the Oregon Toll Program's Equity Framework and who are impacted by tolling.
  • Accountability and community engagement in the toll rate setting process including continued engagement of EMAC's successor over the coming years.
    • Ongoing monitoring, evaluation, and feedback to advance equity once tolls are in place.
The EMAC advises ODOT and the OTC on creating a process for delivering equitable outcomes on the I-205 Toll Project and Regional Mobility Pricing Project. EMAC's work informs guidelines, strategies, processes, and policies to advance equity with implementable measures before and after tolling begins. 

The EMAC has 13 members, including members appointed by the ODOT Director and selected through an open application process. Committee members represent a spectrum of mobility and equity interests.

Contributing Committee Members 
Abe Moland (former representative of Clackamas County Health and Transportation)
Amanda Garcia-Snell, Washington County Community Engagement
Bill Baumann (former representative of Community in Motion)
Diana Avalos Leos (former representative of League of United Latin American Citizens Latino Youth Conference)
Dr. Philip Wu, Oregon Environmental Council
Dwight Brashear, SMART
Eduardo Ramos, At-large member
Fabian Hidalgo Guerrero, Oregon Food Bank
Germaine Flentroy, Beyond Black/Play, Grow, Learn
Ismael Armenta, At-large member; Oregon Walks
James Paulson, WorkSystems Inc. Board
John Gardner, TriMet
Kari Schlosshauer, former At-large member
Michael Espinoza, Portland Bureau of Transportation
Park Woodworth, Ride Connection
Sharon Smith, Oregon Transportation Commission

“We’ve worked with EMAC over the past two years, it’s been really hard work. We want to thank them for all the effort they put in and their passion,” noted Lucinda Broussard, Oregon Toll Program Director. “The work is not done. We still have a lot we need to move forward as we try to do things differently and make sure that we include people who normally have not been included in our processes.” 

​​​The EMAC will continue to meet throughout the toll rate setting process, which is expected to occur through 2025.

Other tolling news:

  • Comment through September 15 on draft tolling policy. The public is invited to review a draft amendment to the Oregon Highway Plan that will guide the state in using tolling as a way to raise funds for transportation system improvements. Read the draft amendment here and find out how to comment here. ​

​Options to assist people experiencing low incomes

As part of its effort to evaluate tolling and advance equity, the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) has drafted a Low-Income Toll Report, developed in response to input from local and statewide voices. This report is just one part of ODOT’s larger statewide strategy and informs the agency’s approach to implement low-income toll benefits before tolling would begin, currently planned for 2024.

The report shares proposed options for income eligibility, types of benefits, ways to design an inclusive program, and initiating and monitoring of a low-income toll program.

Feedback is welcome on the draft by July 18, 2022 by emailing oregontolling@odot.oregon.gov and including “Low-Income Toll Report” in the subject line.

Comments received will help further refine the options for consideration and implementation practices presented in the final report. The report is due to the Oregon Transportation Commission (OTC) and the Oregon Legislature in September 2022.

Public review invited on draft tolling policy 

The public is invited to review a draft amendment to the Oregon Highway Plan that will guide the state in using tolling as a way to raise funds for transportation system improvements. The comment period is open until September 15. Read the draft amendment here (PDF): OHP Policy Amendment Draft for Public Review (oregon.gov).

A public hearing will be held on July 20 at 1 p.m. Information on how to access these events is posted on the website.

What is it?
The Oregon Highway Plan has an existing policy section on tolling. This draft policy amendment proposes an update to that section, which is "Goal No. 6: Tolling." The draft amendment is intended to modernize the state's pricing and tolling policy. It defines terms, such as congestion pricing, and it offers guidance for the use of revenue and setting rates (but it does not set rates). It also provides the Oregon Transportation Commission with clearer direction for decision making. There are 15 policies in the draft amendment, each with actions to guide implementing the policy.

Note: This amendment is not about whether or not the state should toll roads; instead, it provides guidance for doing so if the state decides to use tolling.

Public input will inform potential revisions to the plan amendment. The goal is to have a final version ready for adoption later this year. If you would like to comment, please review the draft amendment. You may also want to attend the webinar and hearing.  An online comment card on the website is available to submit comments. You can also send an email with comments to OHPmanager@odot.oregon.gov.

Background
The Oregon Highway Plan is the state's primary highway guide, establishing a 20-year vision and strategic framework for Oregon's road system. The current plan (PDF) was approved by the commission in 1999 and has been modified numerous times, including in 2012 to add the current section on tolling.

Centering equity in toll projects

 
Hear from EMAC members about their work by watching a short video.

After two years of thoughtful, dedicated work and candid conversation, Equity and Mobility Advisory Committee (EMAC) members brought their July 2022 recommendations to the Oregon Transportation Commission. Hear from these community leaders about why they are engaged in this work, their perspectives on equity and mobility, and their ideas on how to advance an equitable toll program. 

Other tolling news:
  • The Oregon Transportation Commission heard the EMAC's recommendations and an update on tolling. Meeting details are here.
  • ODOT is updating the Oregon Highway Plan to modernize toll policies and connect to equity and climate goals. Find out how to get involved! 

​​Overlooked communities get a voice when planning for tolls 

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A partnership between the Community Engagement Liaison (CEL) program and the Oregon Department of Transportation has elevated the concerns and ideas for tolling from community members who are often overlooked. Liaisons are active community leaders who provide interpretation, translation, and engagement services for toll projects. We caught up with a few of the liaisons to learn more.

Other tolling news:
  • The Oregon Transportation Commission meets on July 14 and will hear an update on tolling. Meeting details are here.
  • Learn more about the updated schedule for the I-205 Toll Project public comment period.
Photo Captions (in order of appearance): 
Yvonne Li, Community Engagement Liaison for the Chinese community
Hanna Grishkevich, Community Engagement Liaison for the Slavic community
Romeo Sosa, Community Engagement Liaison for Latin American communit
Trevor Attenberg, Community Engagement Liaison for people living with disabilities
Jay Tang, Community Engagement Liaison for the Vietnamese community

Project Team (PT): What led you to get involved as a CEL? What has been most rewarding to you in this work?

Yvonne Li (YL): I'm a Chinese immigrant. It was hard to come here at a young age, my family relied on me to communicate for them. That is how I started to get involved with my community, and I've continued ever since. I enjoy sharing government projects with my community that they may not know about and helping them understand what is happening to the city.

Hanna Grishkevich.jpgHanna Grishkevich (HG): I've been a Community Engagement Liaison (CEL) for eight years. It's been an educational experience for myself and my community. The government structure is different here [in the United States], and I was not familiar with how local government works and the distinctions between city and county government. It's rewarding to have project knowledge at the forefront and share information with my community.

Jay Tang (JT): I love what I do as CEL and that I can get to interact with a variety of people. It’s nice that folks from different professions and identities can hear different perspectives and stories, then reflect this feedback into projects.

Romeo Sosa blur.jpg
PT: Why is it important that ODOT partners with CELs to do this type of engagement?

Romeo Sosa (RS): It's important to work together to bridge communications between different worlds and languages. The talent that CELs bring is that we can communicate in an easy and effective way to our communities to allow them to pass the message along to others.
Headshot Trevor Attenberg.JPG

HG: There is a historic distrust towards government relations. People don't believe that we play any part in decision-making. It's important to bring communities together to be transparent in the process and explain that some decisions are not a yes or no vote, but about “how."

Trevor Attenberg (TA): CELs are supposed to be a means to reach out to often overlooked communities who are unrecognized in public policy and dialogue. When you include voices and feedback from minority communities, including the multitude of disabled folks, you have a greater foundation to create policies for things you seek to achieve.

PT: What do you want people to know about the interests and concerns of your community when it comes to tolling? 

TA: The disability community is diverse, and you can't generalize. What is good for one disabled group may be perceived as negative to another. Some folks don't drive but are passengers in vehicles. Others can drive but have trouble with multimodal alternatives and public transit. 

RS: There is concern about the impacts of tolling on people experiencing low incomes. Working people will have to use these roads and bridges to get to and from work. Some folks have good ideas on how to mitigate impacts, and it's important to hear their stories from other countries. In other countries there have been positive impacts to the community.

HG: This is a community that drives, I've yet to find someone [in the Slavic community residing in the Portland metropolitan region] that uses public transit. People believe that tolling isn't the way to raise funds, and that the funds raised won't go towards fixing potholes. 

Headshot Jay Lan.jpg
YL: Most people are interested in finding out what the price will be and if tolling will reduce traffic and emissions once implemented.

JT: Many folks want to be able to budget for it and plan for any financial concerns and travel time impacts. They want to see how significant the outcomes will be.

This spring, CELs conducted nine discussion groups and helped seek input through a survey for the Regional Mobility Pricing Project. We will share more information about the results of what they heard this summer.

Your participation is important to help create an equitable toll program. Visit the Oregon Tolling Program website to stay up to date on opportunities to get involved and share your voice.

Updated schedule for I-205 Toll Project public comment period

ODOT is currently analyzing the traffic and environmental effects of the project in 2027 and 2045 and will publish the results in a document called an “environmental assessment." The assessment will compare two alternatives: Tolling and building the remainder of the I-205 Improvements Project after the Abernethy Bridge and not tolling and not building additional improvements.

Our schedule has shifted as we have conducted additional traffic modeling that was requested by local agency partners. In addition, the I-205 Improvements Project has conducted an environmental “re-evaluation" of building the initial phase of the project, called Phase 1A. Phase 1A includes the seismic retrofit and widening of the Abernethy Bridge, as well as improvements to the adjacent interchanges (OR 99E and OR 43). Phase 1A brings this critical infrastructure up to current seismic standards, but the full project is needed to realize improvements to travel time and mobility.  The report may be found online.

The environmental and traffic effects of the rest of the I-205 Improvements Project (including the additional lanes) will now be included as part of the I-205 Toll Project Environmental Assessment which is currently underway. These improvements, when implemented with a variable rate toll, will provide significant improvements to travel time and mobility.

Results of an environmental study for the I-205 Toll Project are expected to be released for public review and comment in fall 2022. We'll have more specifics on the timing next month. Our schedule to launch tolls on I-205 remains the same: late 2024.


​Helping people with low incomes benefit from the toll program

​One of the most pressing questions people have about tolling coming to Oregon is, “How will you help people experiencing low incomes and how are they being considered in decision-making?

In 2018, the Oregon Transportation Commission committed to addressing the needs of people experiencing low incomes. The Oregon Legislature required a report this year on progress toward meeting that goal. The report will detail how people experiencing low incomes can access the positive benefits of tolling (travel time savings, reliability, and safety), while minimizing the burden of toll fees. 

Ideas under consideration:

  • Amount of discount, credit, or exemption for people experiencing low incomes.
  • The income-level that should receive the low-income discount, credit, or exemption.
  • Ways to demonstrate program eligibility through existing programs.
  • Cash-based options for people who have limited or no banking resources.
  • Shared benefits with other low-income programs, such as TriMet's Reduced Fare program.

If you would like to share your ideas, please email the project team at OregonTolling@odot.state.or.us by May 25. Please put “Low-Income Toll Report" in the subject line.

View Report this summer.

Members of the Equity and Mobility Advisory Committee are working alongside a technical team to develop a Low-Income Toll Report. ODOT conducted research to learn about similar programs around the country, as well as engaged with local communities about how a program could work best.

A draft report and recommendations will be considered by the Oregon Transportation Commission this summer. The OTC is the tolling authority for the state and directs ODOT's work. By September 2022, ODOT will provide the report to the Oregon Legislature.

Ongoing monitoring to occur. 

Tolling is anticipated to start in late 2024 on I-205. After tolling begins, ODOT will closely monitor the program to ensure it is accessible, working well for users, and providing a benefit. 

ODOT details commitments for I-205 Toll Project and Regional Mobility Pricing Project

May 2022 Story 2.jpg 


Through ongoing conversations with regional elected officials and agencies, the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) developed six commitments to detail how it will work with local communities, transportation service providers, and other regional partners to plan and implement toll projects in Oregon and guide recommendations for the Oregon Transportation Commission.

ODOT developed these commitments in advance of decisions by Oregon Metro to amend regional transportation plans to link the I-205 Toll Project and the I-205 Improvements Project.

ODOT committed to:
  • Elevating the voice of local stakeholders
  • Developing a plan to address potential effects of traffic rerouting with local input.
  • Enhancing the connection between the Regional Mobility Pricing Project and I-205 Toll Project.
  • Centering equity in our process and outcomes.
  • Increasing regional transit and multimodal transportation options.
  • Providing the financial transparency needed to build trust and understanding. 

For more details, visit Metro's website.


​Experience From Other Cities Shows Congestion Pricing Improves Traffic

Traffic is a growing problem in the Portland metropolitan region. We need a solution to make everyday travel safe and efficient. That’s why the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) is looking at congestion pricing, a proven tool used in cities worldwide to reduce traffic, improve safety and provide stable funding for infrastructure projects, including upgrading or replacing bridges to be seismically resilient.

Congestion pricing, a type of tolling, is a new concept to Portland but is used to manage traffic globally. In cities, space is limited, and we make choices about how to best use that space. When something is in high demand, the value or price can increase. Limited roadway space is no different. Congestion pricing works by increasing the cost to use the roadway during rush hour, typically 6-8 a.m. and 4-6 p.m. Some drivers might delay running errands, while a commuter may decide to take a bus, work from home, ride their bike or walk instead of drive. According to the U.S. Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), removing as little as 5% of the vehicles from a busy road reduces traffic and allows a more efficient flow of cars.

Removing as little as 5% of the vehicles from a busy road reduces traffic and allows a more efficient flow of cars.
Photo: When 5% of people shift from taking their car to taking a bus, train, biking, walking, traveling during off-peak hours or working remotely; it reduces traffic on a busy road.

ODOT is currently advancing two toll projects in the Portland region, the I-205 Toll Project and the Regional Mobility Pricing Project. Both projects aim to manage traffic congestion and raise revenue for transportation mobility and safety projects, such as the I-205 Improvements Project. These investments are critical as Portland roads and bridges built in the middle of the 20th century need seismic upgrades to withstand a major earthquake.

Portland is not the first city to explore congestion pricing as a traffic reduction tool. Places like Seattle and Minneapolis/St. Paul have been using congestion pricing for over a decade and have found great success. In Seattle, FHWA reported traffic volumes decreased by 35-40%, and in Minneapolis/St. Paul, the state’s Department of Transportation found drivers were able to travel at speeds above 45 mph approximately 96% of the time.

Internationally, we can look to countries like Sweden, where congestion pricing has been in effect for over 12 years, reducing travel times and decreasing local pollution, and providing a steady stream of funding for new infrastructure. In Singapore, the city experienced environmental and public health benefits because of less traffic — preventing an estimated 175,000 pounds of carbon dioxide each day.

We get it — no one likes paying tolls or fees. Studies show that drivers need to “see it to believe it” when it comes to how tolling reduces traffic, and we know Oregon residents are no different. Travelers and community members will have a lot of questions, so our goal is to share what we learn with you and how your voice can shape the project. As part of our initial planning, ODOT is studying traffic effects from tolling to see how it could address congestion and travel times. Early results show daily traffic jams on I-205 near Oregon City could be reduced from 14 hours to two hours daily once the seven miles of I-205 construction are complete and variable rate tolls for the I-205 Toll Project are used. We’ll provide some preliminary findings this spring for the Regional Mobility Pricing Project with more detailed results in the environmental review phase.

Your participation is important to help create an equitable toll program. Later this month, please join us for community webinars and share your thoughts through an online survey. Visit the Oregon Tolling Program website to stay up to date on future opportunities to get involved and learn more about how we are moving Portland forward.

Get answers to your questions about tolling. Share your voice.

Join an upcoming webinar: more detail to come!
More information about the survey and webinar will soon be available here


Making History: Women are leading the way to create an equitable toll program


It’s Women’s History Month and ODOT’s Urban Mobility Office (UMO) is spotlighting the women leading the I-205 Toll Project and the Regional Mobility Pricing Project and the work they do to help Oregon communities thrive.

“Women play a variety of roles either in community or family. They may access transportation and have transportation needs that are different. If you don’t have them around the table, you miss a lot,” said Mandy Putney, ODOT Strategic Initiatives director managing the I-205 NEPA Toll Project. Learn more about how these leaders are developing an equitable toll program.

Project Team (PT): What led you to pursue a career in transportation?  

Jessica Stanton (JS): Several years ago the Portland Bureau of Transportation initiated an effort to tell the agency’s story and connect with the community. I talked to many fourth-generation Portlanders who had no idea about PBOT’s work. Transportation is an exciting opportunity for storytelling and to see how people can connect. Transportation is everything, without mobility and community, we wouldn’t be living and thriving.  

Mandy Putney (MP): I have an academic background focused on environmental policy and started working in the social service sector. Then, I found jobs that merged the two, advising on communication and public engagement for infrastructure projects and planning. I began to see that transportation is key for people to live the life they want. Without access to transportation that’s affordable and viable, it inhibits every area of life. For me, the key driving factor is to think about the human-side of infrastructure planning and how to involve the community more.  

PT: As of 2019, women comprised only 15 percent of the transportation workforce, with even fewer in decision-making roles. What advice do you have for women entering the field?  

Hannah Williams (HW): There are so many women in leadership positions at ODOT and it’s been great to work with and be mentored by them. It’s inspiring and helpful when strong, talented women are already working here. My advice would be to reach out to women in roles that you’re interested in, start building relationships, and ask for guidance.  

Lucinda Broussard (LB): I think women are leaders in every place they are, whether it’s at home, work, or community-based groups. What is important to know is as women, there’s room for us to be leaders in other areas. Now is the time to jump in, the water is warm. ​

PT: What motivates you on a daily basis to create an equitable Oregon Tolling Program?

JS: I will only thrive if my community thrives, and equity is a through line. Equity’s time has come, we can lead compassionately and build communities that are just and equitable. We can be better and do better.  

MP: It’s time, it’s past time. Equity and transportation have been talked about in separate spheres for a long time and resulted in the system we have today. Why do this work now if you’re not interested in doing something different? We know the old ways gets us old results, and I’m not looking to redo the past.  

HW: We’re trying to do something that’s never been done before. We’re trying to have innovative solutions for these huge problems that aren’t siloed in transportation. When I think about equity I think about outcomes, the people, and the process. To achieve creative solutions for the Oregon Toll Program, we need to talk to people, understand needs, and collaborate with our partners.  

LB: We should not talk about equity separately, it should be interwoven. People don’t ask me how to create a quality program, because it’s expected, and equity should be that way too. I see that equity in transportation, or equity in life, has always been separate. Equity should be integrated into everything we do. ​

PT: You mentioned that the Urban Mobility Office is doing something that’s never been done before. What is unique about the UMO’s approach? What challenges are we facing?  ​

LB: Unique is doing something that’s never been done before. We’re talking about tolling all lanes on an interstate to manage congestion. Managing congestion by pricing for all lanes is unique, and even more unique because we’re talking about doing it over 50 miles. I believe we will be successful. I consider congestion pricing a way to give people back some time in their lives.  ​

MP: We’re not doing the typical project by project approach; we’ve got a comprehensive approach we’re tying all together with congestion pricing as the backbone. And we’re trying to do so in close partnership with others in the region. We can’t solve every issue with transportation projects, but we can bring people to the table to have conversations about community development, transit, and multi-modal access to create outcomes that help folks.  ​

HW: It can be overwhelming thinking about challenges in the transportation system. When we are talking about equity, it’s hard to pull things apart because it is all connected. I try to stay focused on the project at hand and how to make it the most equitable with the process and outcomes. By making each project as equitable as possible, I hope that change will spiral outwards.   

JS: The challenge is how do we break away from old paradigms of thinking to arrive at a new outcome? It requires a lot of faith and trust in places where there hasn’t been. We’re asking ourselves and communities to move forward in a different way.    

LB: UMO is bringing in the consideration that we’re building projects “for people” that wasn’t there before. We’re asking for engagement and participation from partners and the community, and I think that is something unique. ​

PT: Lastly, what do you see as the importance of having women represented in transportation and public engagement? 

HW: Part of our work is to think about different experiences and perspectives. It’s important to have people who are also working on the project represent different experiences and opinions.  ​

MP: Women play a variety of roles either in community or family. They may access transportation and have transportation needs that are different. If you don’t have them around the table, you miss a lot. The project will have a better result if you bring in a variety of people, not only into the process but leading it as well.

To learn more about their work and what is happening with the Oregon Tolling Program, visit oregontolling.org. If you are interested in a career at ODOT or in transportation, visit https://www.oregon.gov/odot/about/pages/career-opportunities.aspx or email oregontolling@odot.state.or.us.


Results show I-205 congestion drops from 14 to two hours daily with tolling and highway improvements. Join an upcoming webinar to learn more.

Since discussions began about using variable rate tolls on I-5 and I-205 to manage congestion, we've heard many questions and concerns about how tolls will affect traffic.

ODOT also has questions. We're using computer models to predict what will happen to traffic on the tolled highway as well as local roads with variable rate tolls. This analysis is part of the required environmental review process. For the I-205 Toll Project, preliminary results show that tolling and investing in I-205 will significantly reduce congestion on I-205.

Our analysis shows traffic congestion on I-205 near Oregon City could be reduced from 14 hours to two hours daily once the seven miles of I-205 construction improvements are complete, and variable rate tolls are used.

Drivers would see a 50% decrease in afternoon travel time and a 25% decrease in the morning, the analysis found. In addition, travel times would become more reliable, and the number of crashes would shrink, improving travel efficiency and safety.

According to our study results, not building the I-205 Improvements Project and I-205 Toll Project by 2045 would result in 14 daily hours of total congestion on I-205 between OR 213 and Stafford Road, and an increase in crashes in this region.

“The data is good news for I-205 travelers and freight haulers, and reduced congestion and fewer vehicle miles traveled provides climate benefits," said Mandy Putney, I-205 Improvements Project director. “That said, we are focused on a handful of local intersections where we see congestion is worse. We are inviting the communities to discuss ideas on how to address these issues." 

How will tolls affect traffic?

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This video discusses how tolls could affect traffic. 

​​​Join us!

The public is invited to hear the preliminary results of our ongoing traffic analysis February 15 and February 16. ​

Early results show daily traffic jams on I-205 near Oregon City would drop significantly with a proposal under study. Project staff will be on hand to answer questions following a presentation. 

The sessions will focus on: 

  • How ODOT is studying traffic effects on I-205 and local roads
  • Early results on hours of congestion, travel time and neighborhood health and safety
  • Strategies that could be used to address any negative impacts

Webinar questions may be submitted in advance by emailing oregontolling@odot.state.or.us with “webinar question" in the subject line. Questions will also be taken in the chat.

The webinars will take place on Zoom. You can join online or by phone. No RSVP is needed. Both webinars will have the same content.

You do not need a Zoom account to access the meeting. You may be prompted to enter your name or email address -- the information you enter may be visible to those attending the meeting.

This meeting will also be livestreamed on ODOT's YouTube Channel.​

Webinar #1 – February 15 at Noon
Click this link to join the meeting on Zoom.
Telephone dial in by phone 877 853 5257 (Toll Free)
Webinar ID: 868 8230 0486

Webinar #2 – February 16 at 5:30 PM
Click this link to join the meeting on Zoom.
Telephone dial in by phone 877 853 5257 (Toll Free)
Webinar ID: 829 7438 2309

You can learn more about how tolls affect traffic by reading a fact sheet.

​Request a presentation to your organization by contacting the project team​.

What does the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act mean for Oregon? - An interview with Travis Brouwer of ODOT.

The recent passage of the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (referred to here as the “Infrastructure Bill") in November 2021 represents the largest investment in our nation's infrastructure in several decades, and is an increasingly rare bipartisan achievement in federal legislation. The Oregon Toll Program project team connected virtually with Travis Brouwer, Assistant Director for Revenue, Finance, and Compliance at the Oregon Department of Transportation, to learn how the Infrastructure Bill will change the landscape of transportation in Oregon.

​Project Team (PT): I understand that getting an infrastructure bill passed is something you have been working on for at least a decade. How does it feel now that an infrastructure bill is a reality?

Travis Brouwer (TB): It's true that I have been working hard to increase the federal level of investment, and counter federal disinvestment in transportation for a long time. I came to ODOT a few months after Congress passed a substantial infrastructure investment, SAFETEA-LU, in 2005. Federal funding has pretty much been stagnant since that time, and the lack of partnership and investment from the federal government has been really frustrating. So, it feels really great to have an infrastructure bill finally passed, and it is a once in a generation investment into our transportation system.

PT: The Infrastructure Bill includes more than $500 billion in funding for transportation, but most people aren't tracking this every day like you are. What does this mean for Oregon? How will this change the day-to-day lives of Oregonians?

​TB: One thing that Oregonians will see is a significant investment in bridges across the state. We need to address bridges that are reaching the end of their functional lives, and we need to keep them open and safe by preserving and protecting them. It usually costs less to keep our transportation infrastructure in good condition compared to letting it deteriorate to the point where we have to rebuild roads and bridges from scratch.

Another impactful area where Oregonians will see increased investment is electric vehicle charging infrastructure. Many people would love to own an electric vehicle, but they are concerned about running out of juice, and rightly so! I own an electric vehicle and my family recently wanted to take it out to Seaside. But we realized we couldn't get there and back on one charge, and there isn't a public charging station in Seaside. Investing in electric vehicle charging infrastructure will be really helpful in transitioning our auto fleet away from fossil fuels and will help us achieve our climate goals.

There will also be a lot of focus on sustainable methods of transportation, like increased funding for bike paths and walkways and transit, so that people can get out of sitting in traffic and do so safely​.

PT: So, if Oregon is set to receive more infrastructure funding, why do we still need tolling? 

TB: I've been getting this question a lot lately. The reality is that federal money alone is not enough to fund maintenance of the system we already have, much less improving it. Projects we need in the Portland metropolitan region to address mobility are so large, we cannot fund them using state funds, like the gas tax, even with the infusion of federal money. We're getting about $400 million from the Infrastructure Bill that the Oregon Transportation Commission must decide what to do with. Even if we used every single dollar coming to the entire state, it would not be enough to completely fund even a single project in our program, certainly not the Interstate Bridge Replacement or Rose Quarter, which is estimated to cost $1.18 to $1.25 billion.

There are major new grant programs in the Infrastructure Bill for freight movement and reconnecting communities. Toll funding will be used to leverage those grant funds; if we are able to show that we have a plan to raise funding on our own, we have a better chance of securing federal grants. That will ultimately reduce the total amount that Oregonians will directly pay. We also need to use tolling to better manage traffic and keep it in check, so it is not only about funding either.  

​PT: Why is tolling beginning on I-205 first?

TB: Investing in the section of I-205 around the Abernethy Bridge was identified as a priority project by local leaders in Clackamas County, the region and the state. In order for ODOT to keep the I-205 Improvement Projects on schedule, including the work being done to remove bottlenecks, we need to complete the environmental analysis under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and obtain a federal decision in late 2022. This will allow implementation of tolling on this section of I-205 in late 2024. The Regional Mobility Pricing Project needs to complete additional planning and community conversations before beginning review under NEPA, and will require additional federal decisions. The I-205 Toll Project and regional tolling project will be integrated once both are brought online by late 2025.​

PT: Helping manage ODOT seems like a big, complicated challenge. What keeps you motivated to come into work every day and get these projects off the ground?

TB: When the Infrastructure Bill passed, I had a moment of exhilaration, followed by the quick realization that we had a lot of work in front of us. This is a great opportunity to use a billion dollars of investment to make our communities better places to live. That’s what keeps me going, even in the face of working many hours through thorny issues. All of us are going to be working our backsides off getting this money out into the streets.​

PT: You've mentioned a number of big projects in the Portland metropolitan region. What does the transportation network look like in 10, 20, or 50 years? How are people getting around?

TB: I love that question. We are known as an agency that runs the freeways, but we would love a day in the future where demand on the freeway is lessened. We need to make investments across the multimodal system, to take pressure off our freeways so they can serve trucks and long-distance trips to keep the economy moving. We want active transportation systems and public transportation systems to work better. We imagine a future where people can safely walk or bike to their jobs because our development patterns support that, or not commute at all because we have an accessible and equitable broadband system that allows people to work from home. We are not going to grow the freeway system at the same rate as our population grows, because that is impossible. Meeting the growing demand for transportation should be done largely through public and active transportation. As an agency, we are focused on getting people around equitably, efficiently, and safely, while still enabling access and the ability to get around conveniently. 

Travis Brouwer is the Assistant Director for Revenue, Finance, and Compliance at the Oregon Department of Transportation. Travis grew up in Bellingham, Washington, but has lived in Salem for more than 20 years, when he came to ODOT after working as a congressional aide. Of his move into the transportation agency Travis said “I was looking for something less political. It is really rewarding to see the concrete results, literally the concrete, of my efforts."  He can be reached by email at travis.brouwer@odot.oregon.gov. ​


Introducing the R1ACT+ Toll Work Group

Joining together to provide a discussion forum on tolling. 

The Region 1 Area Commission on Transportation is an Oregon-based advisory group that provides a forum for collaborating on transportation issues and advising the Oregon Transportation Commission. One goal is to strengthen state and local partnerships. In that spirit, the R1ACT+ Toll Work Group brings together the R1ACT members, elected officials in southwest Washington, and stakeholders to discuss key questions on tolling.

The R1ACT+ Toll Work Group had its first meeting in September 2021 and will continue with meetings every other month. The group does not take formal votes or actions. Their role is to discuss key questions to help stay informed about the Toll Program.  

The next R1ACT+ Toll Work Group meeting will be Monday, Nov. 1, 5:30-7:30 p.m. You can join the webinar here. There will be 10 minutes reserved for public comment. See the R1ACT website for the agenda and meeting information.  You may submit your written comments by emailing the committee at Oregontolling@odot.state.or.us.

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The Equity and Mobility Advisory Committee continues to refine recommendations 

Join us for the next meeting on October 27   

The Equity and Mobility Advisory Committee​ is preparing to present to the Oregon Transportation Commission in November. Over the last several committee meetings, members have talked about policies and strategies to support transit and multimodal travel, neighborhood health and safety, and transportation affordability. In October, the committee will focus on key statements as the foundation for a future recommendation to the OTC to advance equity in the Oregon Toll Program.

Please join us for the next meeting of the Equity and Mobility Advisory Committee on Wednesday, Oct. 27 at 3:30 p.m. You can find the meeting information on the website. Submit written comments at any time to the committee by emailing Oregontolling@odot.state.or.us.

Monthly video series continues

Last month we started our monthly video series to share information about the Oregon Toll Program more broadly. You can watch here or access the links through our social media channels. Here is the latest video in the series:

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I-205 Toll Project Community Conversations

What we heard in Clackamas County.

Thank you for your feedback. The Oregon Department of Transportation participated in several meetings with Clackamas County community members in the past month. During discussions with the Leaders for Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Council, the Oregon City Business Alliance, and after participating in the Clackamas County Town Hall, we heard some of the following themes:​

  • Diversion: Concern about drivers avoiding tolls by using local streets. Many commented that they are already experiencing diversion and are worried that the tolls would increase traffic on local roads.
  • Equity: Interest in avoiding unequal negative impacts to working people, seniors, and those without alternative route options. We heard ODOT should consider how underserved drivers in different geographies will be affected differently.
  • Funding: Questions about why tolling is needed and why other funding sources cannot be used to make improvements.
  • Fairness: Concern that the project is unfair to those in Oregon City, West Linn, and the surrounding areas since transit options are limited and that area will be tolled first.​

In advance of the release of the Environmental Assessment in Spring 2022, the project team is continuing to meet with communities in Clackamas County and provide information about what we know now and how questions will be answered. If your community organization is interested in a briefing, please email Oregontolling@odot.oregon.gov.

Clackamas County Logo 

Regional Mobility Pricing Project Updates

Regional workshop results are now available. 

In November 2021, the Oregon Department of Transportation hosted two virtual workshops to explore congestion pricing in the Portland metropolitan area with elected officials, business and community leaders, and local and regional agency staff. Thank you to over 50 workshop attendees who participated and everyone who responded to the public survey. You can read the full summary here or view meeting materials and videos from the workshops here.

November 10 workshop poll results: What three words describe an ideal transportation system?

November 10 workshop poll results word cloud.

Engaging with community-based organizations.

On November 17, we invited several community-based organizations to a virtual discussion to learn more about the Oregon Toll Program and the Equity and Mobility Advisory Committee’s role while discussing the program and preferences for future engagement. Thank you to representatives from the Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon, Black United Fund, Exceed Enterprises, Latino Network, and Ride Connection for joining us. We value the interests and concerns of community-based organizations. They highlighted the need for alternative transportation options, potential impacts of tolls, and the best ways to continue the conversation with their communities.

Please contact Hannah Williams, ODOT Community Engagement Coordinator, at Hannah.Williams@odot.oregon.gov if your organization is interested in participating in a future discussion. 

We're moving!

Introducing the Urban Mobility Office newsletter. 

In January 2022, our monthly news is moving to a new Urban Mobility Office newsletter. You’ll still have access to Oregon Toll Project updates in this new format, along with important news about projects in the Portland metropolitan area. Our website is always the best source for immediate information and to answer your questions. All subscribers of this newsletter will automatically receive our new newsletter and Toll Program updates. Thank you for reading our articles. We wish you a safe and happy holiday season.


Travelers and the community have their say about congestion pricing in the Portland metropolitan area

Participants agree traffic is a problem, but they have questions and concerns about potential solutions. 

In response to questions about how to design a congestion pricing project that can work for the Portland metropolitan area, thousands of people shared their perspectives about traffic and proposed solutions earlier this year.

The Oregon Department of Transportation learned many people view congestion as a problem in the Portland metropolitan area, including southwest Washington. The proposed use of congestion pricing – a type of tolling where the fee is higher during peak travel times – generated many questions and concerns during online meetings and surveys held June through November. ODOT continues to invite public input on a congestion pricing project to keep the economy and travelers moving.

“As we have discussions with communities, the idea that we need to think holistically about the transportation system comes through again and again. People say they need options and real choices for mobility," said Lucinda Broussard, ODOT Toll Program Director. “We hear this and will be working closely with our partners to address these needs."

The Regional Mobility Pricing Project would apply congestion pricing on all lanes of I-5 and I-205 in the Portland metropolitan area to manage traffic congestion and raise revenue for priority transportation projects that improve mobility. The project area begins just south of the Columbia River in Oregon and ends at the Boone Bridge in Wilsonville.

A separate project, the I-205 Toll Project, is under environmental review. This project would apply congestion pricing on vehicles that cross the two I-205 bridges over the Willamette River (Abernethy Bridge) and the Tualatin River to raise revenue for completion of the I-205 Improvements Project, which will eliminate an existing bottleneck along a 7-mile segment of highway. 

For both projects, toll rates would vary on a set schedule based on time of day, type of vehicle, and the distance travelled on I-5 and I-205.

Below are some highlights of what we've learned so far to inform future planning for the Regional Mobility Pricing Project. A full report on community engagement activities and input from June to September 2021 may be found online.

Community feedback 

  • 2 November workshops with elected officials, business and community leaders, and public agency staff 
  • 6 discussion groups with historically excluded and underserved communities, including Black/African​ American, Native American, Latin American, Chinese, Vietnamese, and Russian/Slavic communities
  • 6,500+ responses from 5 surveys
  • 29 briefings (June-September)
  • 12 meetings of advisory committees and work groups (June-September)
  • 300+ emails, letters, web comments (June-September)
Community voices

ODOT partnered with community engagement liaisons to invite feedback through discussion groups with historically excluded and underserved communities. Learn more about what they heard from their communities.

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“It was clear that no one wants to pay for being on the road, but it was also clear that people also don't want to be in traffic." – Hanna Grishkevich, Slavic Community Engagement Liaison
What we heard

  1. Participants agree traffic is a problem, and COVID has not significantly changed travel. Over 2,000 survey responses (85%) think traffic is a problem or somewhat of a problem in the Portland metropolitan area. Nearly 1,800 responses (69%) identified traveling the same or more since the rise of the pandemic in March 2020.
  1. Participants have questions about how a toll system can help address congestion and what benefits they would see. People want to know more about the need for transportation funding, how it will be used, if it will benefit travelers, and how congestion pricing will help keep traffic moving. Workshop participants said that if drivers pay tolls, they want to experience travel time reliance and predictability improvements that are worth those costs.
  1. Participants want to ensure vulnerable populations are not disproportionately impacted by the tolling program. Meeting participants discussed that it was critical to develop a tolling system that doesn't make existing inequities worse, but rather helps make progress toward regional equity goals. About a third of survey respondents (37%) supported a discounted toll rate for drivers experiencing low incomes and other impacted groups.
  1. Diversion is a significant concern. Questions about how tolls would impact traffic on local street networks emerged during many discussions, as well as the consequences of traffic diversion related to safety, local businesses, and overall quality of life for residents. While some workshop participants acknowledged that tolling could have a positive impact by keeping vehicles moving on I-5 and I-205, there was concern that if toll rates are too high people might use other routes instead.
  1. Participants want travel choices. There was support for toll-free travel options, such as toll free routes, lanes or improved transit service. Half of survey respondents (52%) noted that they would consider paying a toll if it would save them 30 minutes of travel time. Participants voiced a need for better alternatives to driving, such as improvements to bike, walk, and transit options. Workshop participants requested more clarity on how these options could be funded through toll revenues.

Moving forward to find a solution

Feedback will help advance early planning.

We're appreciative of community feedback about the need for accessible, affordable transportation. With the feedback we've heard to date, we will update the draft Purpose and Need Statement for the Regional Mobility Pricing Project, and begin to develop a concept for what congestion pricing could look like on I-5 and I-205. Congestion pricing is an effective tool to fix our transportation problems, and a key component of ODOT's vision to keep people moving through the greater Portland area.

Congestion pricing will be a big change, and we need your help to get it right. Please look for future opportunities in winter 2022 to help us shape a solution. We invite you to stay engaged to hear about future opportunities and share your voice!​

​Monthly video series begins

In recent weeks, we have heard a need to get more information about the Oregon Toll Program into public conversations. We've started a monthly video series to do just that. We will share the links here and through social media. Here is the latest: 
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“The toll rate will be the sweet spot between the goal of managing congestion and generating revenue." - Garet S. Prior, Toll Policy Manager

Get a snapshot of the progress our toll team made in our monthly video recap video. Watch the full video here

Addressing transportation problems on I-5 and I-205

Draft Purpose and Need Statement available for public comment.  

This fall, we are continuing early planning and inviting feedback for the Regional Mobility Pricing Project. Key activities include:

  • Gathering comments on a discussion draft Purpose and Need Statement to describe what key issues the Project will address based on the problem statement and public input to date. Please share your thoughts by emailing the project team at OregonTolling@odot.state.or.us by October 29, 2021, with “Purpose and Need Statement" in the subject line.
  • Summarizing the findings from the over 6,500 responses to the quick surveys this summer and discussion groups with multilingual and underserved communities.
  • Developing a range of project options to meet the project purpose. To do this, we'll start with outcomes from our initial tolling analysis in 2018. We'll also consider public feedback to date and ODOT's vision for urban mobility.

Public involvement is key so we understand community interests and needs as we develop the project. Sign up for project updates and follow us on social media to hear about future opportunities to comment.

Thanks for taking our survey!

I-205 Toll Project Update

Tolling will raise revenue to fix the bottleneck on I-205 and manage congestion long-term.

Why are we moving forward with our I-205 Toll Project?  

We've recently updated the I-205 Toll Project Purpose and Need Statement, which describes the reasons why tolling will be critical to raising revenue to fix the bottleneck on I-205 and manage congestion long-term. 

Tolling revenue will help complete the I-205 Improvements Project.

Revenue from the I-205 Toll Project is needed to complete the I-205 Improvements Project

Without tolls and future roadway upgrades, the almost seven hours of daily congestion and safety risks will continue to grow as more people use the highway. Diversion to local streets will also increase when I-205 has stop-and-go traffic. Read our fact sheet to learn more.

We met with people at the Oregon City Farmers Market on Saturday, September 25.

We met with people at the Oregon City Farmers Market on Saturday, September 25

We heard support for improvements to the corridor and the need for more consistent funding. People also expressed concerns regarding increased traffic on local streets and the ease and convenience of paying for tolls.

Public outreach for the I-205 Toll Project and I-205 Improvements Project  is moving full steam ahead. Together, we will be meeting with stakeholders in Oregon City and West Linn in the coming months. Follow us on Twitter to get program updates.

We anticipate having the I-205 Toll Project Environmental Assessment available for your review in spring 2022. When we release the document, we will notify you and give you the opportunity to provide written or verbal comment on our analysis before decisions are made. Contact us if you would like to schedule a briefing.

Getting to know the Equity and Mobility Advisory Committee 

The Equity and Mobility Advisory Committee includes 15 individuals with professional or lived experience in equity and mobility. This month, we're introducing Diana Avalos Leos, Founder and Director of the Latino Youth Conference and Southwest Washington resident. Diana has been involved in hundreds of different initiatives at institutions and in communities.

Over the last five years, Diana has seen a rise in agencies removing bus routes from the most populated, high density, and low-income areas in Vancouver, Washington. She understands the impacts and inequities those decisions have caused for people who relied on those bus routes as their only mode of transportation. 

“I joined the committee to bring a voice that has been missing in terms of representation from SW Washington. If we drill down a little bit further, it's the voice of our communities of color, of disenfranchised folks who never have a voice at these critical discussions and decision-making points that mostly impact them."

Picture of Diana Avalos Leos

She is most proud of the work EMAC has done regarding equity, and how that is the catalyst for future projects. Diana believes leading with equity and the equity framework will serve as a standard for future projects and how they look at communities.

Get involved

Join us for the next Equity and Mobility Advisory Committee on October 27 at 3:30 p.m. You can find the meeting information at the website. Submit written comments at any time to the committee by emailing Oregontolling@odot.state.or.us.

Learn more about outcomes from the August meeting, which focused on transportation affordability.​


August 2021​

I-205 Toll Project moves forward

Revenue from the I-205 Toll Project is needed to complete the I-205 Improvements Project. 

The I-205 Improvements Project will begin construction in mid-2022 to make the Abernethy Bridge the first earthquake-ready highway bridge across the Willamette River.

The I-205 Improvements Project  will be constructed in phases. These initial improvements, called Phase 1A, will use financing tools recently approved by the Oregon Legislature.

Toll revenue is needed to construct future phases of the I-205 Improvements Project and could be used to pay back funds borrowed for the Abernethy Bridge. This decision depends on completing the required environmental review under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).

When fully constructed, the I-205 Improvements Project will address the bottleneck caused by the last remaining two-lane section of I-205. The project will reduce crashes and daily congestion by more than four and a half hours each day by adding a third lane in each direction with shoulders that could accommodate buses.

If the toll alternative is selected, potential toll gantries would charge tolls at two locations:  the Abernethy Bridge and the Tualatin River Bridge.

If the toll alternative is selected, potential toll gantries would charge tolls at two locations: the Abernethy Bridge and the Tualatin River Bridge.

The I-205 Toll Project under study would toll vehicles crossing the Abernethy and Tualatin River bridges.  The earliest tolls could begin is in 2024.

Without tolls and future roadway upgrades, the almost seven hours of daily congestion and safety risks will continue to grow as more people use the highway. Without action, diversion to local streets will also increase when I-205 has more stop-and-go traffic.

Continue to talk with us. 

We have worked with the I-205 community since 2017 and received strong support to construct project improvements. Statewide, we’ve heard the need to remove this bottleneck.  

We know people have concerns with tolls and we are working to create a system that works for all the region’s travelers. Over the next year, ODOT will complete the required federal environmental analysis for the I-205 Toll Project and determine how a new toll system can be implemented equitably. We will host discussions in the coming months to share findings from the environmental review. Before final decisions are made, we will also host a listening session on the I-205 Toll Project Environmental Assessment and gather verbal comments.

More information:

Listening to you

Community engagement for the Regional Mobility Pricing Project.  

Thank you for your input!

We received over 6,000 responses to our series of five, one-minute surveys over the past month about the Regional Mobility Pricing Project. Thank you for sharing your feedback! We’ve learned about your travel preferences, what matters most to you, and what could make a regional toll program easier on community members.

Inclusive engagement

An important part of the Regional Mobility Pricing Project is making sure we hear from everyone. For this reason, we are partnering with Community Engagement Liaisons (CELs) to invite participation from multilingual and underserved communities through discussion groups and surveys. 

Thank you to the community members who participated in discussion groups for Native American, Latin American, Russian, Chinese, and Vietnamese communities. Upcoming discussions are scheduled with Black/African American communities and people living with disabilities. We are committed to advancing equitable engagement, as outlined in our Equity Framework.

Next steps

Over the next month, we will review and summarize the results. We’ll share what we heard and how it will inform our next steps. If you missed the surveys, it’s not too late to give feedback! There will be plenty of opportunities to get involved throughout this process. Keep an eye on your inbox or our website for ways to engage.

A photo all those who participated in discussion groups and shared their feedback about a future regional tolling program.
We appreciate all those who participated in discussion groups and shared their feedback about a future regional tolling program.

Equity and Mobility Advisory Committee discusses recommendations to Transportation Commission.

Join us for the next Equity and Mobility Advisory Committee meeting on September 29 at 3:30 p.m. The focus in September will be on refining recommendations to the Oregon Transportation Commission. You can find the meeting information at the Equity and Mobility Advisory Committee website. Submit written comments at any time to the committee by emailing Oregontolling@odot.state.or.us

Quote from an Equity and Mobility Advisory Committee member. Learn more about recent meeting outcomes from June and July meetings, which focused on neighborhood health and safety.

About the Oregon Toll Program 

ODOT has two toll projects underway in the Portland metro area – the I-205 Toll Project and the Regional Mobility Pricing Project – to manage traffic on I-205 and I-5 in a way that is equitable and addresses climate change while providing needed funding for critical infrastructure and safety improvements. While separate projects, they inform each other. Toll prices will be higher at peak traffic times, a concept known as “congestion pricing.” With both projects:

  • Drivers only pay for what they use.
  • Tolls help traffic move more smoothly.
  • Tolls provide a more reliable trip.
  • Toll prices will not be a surprise.

The Oregon Department of Transportation invites your input to make tolls work for our community.



July 2021​

July 22, 2021

What's happening this week? 

Tell us about transportation challenges on I-5 and I-205. 

Thank you for your responses last week to our survey about potential toll benefits! So far, we've received over 1,600 responses to our two quick surveys.

Traffic delays on the highway can lead to traffic problems in local communities, while also negatively impacting our climate, safety, and health. We need a new approach.

This week – in our series of one-minute surveys – we want to know what you think about transportation challenges on I-205 and I-5 in the Portland metro area. Please take our quick survey linked here

Missed the earlier surveys? It's not too late! Use the links below to tell us what you think.

Survey graphic.

How can tolls help?

Tolls could help address transportation problems on I-5 and I-205. 

In last month's eNews we described how travelers need to get to, through and around greater Portland – and our transportation infrastructure isn't keeping pace with our needs. The Regional Mobility Pricing Project will focus on solutions to these problems. To guide our work, we asked for your help in improving the “Problem Statement."

If you would like to provide input on the draft Problem Statement, please email your comments to the project team at OregonTolling@odot.state.or.us and put “Problem Statement" in the subject line. To help inform our planning, we invite responses by Friday, July 30.

Equity and Mobility Advisory Committee Meeting

The Equity and Mobility Advisory Committee is studying ways to advance equity in:

  • Transit and multimodal: Improve public transportation and other travel options.
  • Neighborhood health and safety: Minimize or lessen impacts to neighborhoods near toll roads.
  • Affordability and environmental justice: Consider impacts to people experiencing low incomes or who are underserved.

We know a successful toll program must address these factors, based on what we've heard from the public.

Neighborhood health and safety

Join us for the next Equity and Mobility Advisory Committee meeting on Wednesday, July 28 at 3:30 p.m. The focus will be on neighborhood health and safety. Topics include strategies to minimize impacts on historically underserved neighborhoods and the effects of drivers using local streets to avoid tolls.  Updated meeting information, including links to participate on Zoom or view the YouTube livestream, is available under Meeting Information on the committee's webpage.

Recent meeting outcomes

In April and May, the Equity and Mobility Advisory Committee discussed transit and multimodal strategies to be implemented with a toll program.  The committee's preferred actions included:

  • Exempting public transit vehicles and registered vanpools and carpools from paying tolls.
  • Creating an integrated and easy-to-use fare system coordinated between Oregon and Washington, as well as across different types of mobility (for example, bike, scooter, carpooling, car sharing).
  • Pursuing a regional vision for bus-on-shoulder service with connections to local mobility hubs.
How to get involved

The Equity and Mobility Advisory Committee is studying ways to advance equity in these areas. The committee will share their findings with the Oregon Transportation Commission. Over the next four months, please follow along and participate in this important process. Committee meetings are the last Wednesday of each month. You can find links for meetings and recordings of previous meetings here. Submit written comments at any time to the committee by emailing Oregontolling@odot.state.or.us

Photo of equity and mobility advisory committee participants.


July 15, 2021

Tell us: What matters most to you when it comes to tolling?

Traffic delay on the highway can lead to traffic problems in local communities. Over the next month, we are inviting feedback through a series of quick surveys, with different questions each week. We want to learn from you about travel, transportation problems and priorities, and what you would like to see from the toll program. 

Click here to take our second survey to share what matters most when it comes to tolling on I-5 and I-205. Keep an eye on your inbox – we'll be sending weekly updates for the next four weeks.

Miss the first survey? It's not too late! Tell us here about using I-205 and I-5.

We want to hear from you.png

What is the project?

ODOT has two toll projects underway in the Portland metro area – the I-205 Toll Project and the Regional Mobility Pricing Project – to address traffic on I-205 and I-5 in a way that is equitable and addresses climate change and safety. While separate projects, they inform each other. Toll prices will be higher at peak traffic times, a concept known as “congestion pricing." With both projects:

  • Drivers only pay for what they use.
  • Tolls can help traffic move more smoothly.
  • Tolls provide a more reliable trip.
  • Toll prices will not be a surprise.
Why do we need tolls?

Traffic is getting worse. It is:

  • Making life harder.
  • Bad for our economy.
  • Creating more emissions and contributing to climate change.

There is not enough money from gas taxes or other revenue sources to fix Oregon's highways and fund projects to reduce traffic. It's not easy for people with low incomes, disabilities, and other barriers to get to where they need to go. Tolls can help address these problems and provide a reliable funding source for transportation projects. The Oregon Department of Transportation needs your input to make tolls work for our community.

Advancing equity with tolling: ADA turns 31!

Have you ever noticed curb cutouts or talking traffic signals for people crossing the street? These help make transportation accessible for everyone. This is thanks to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), signed into law 31 years ago this month. The Toll Program wants tolls to improve transportation for people - not make it worse. Our Equity and Mobility Advisory Committee is working on strategies that center transit and multimodal options, neighborhood health and safety, and affordability and undeserved communities. This includes people experiencing a disability.

To help celebrate the 31st anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, there is an upcoming series of free lunch and learn opport​unities.

Here are the basics:

What: The Oregon Disabilities Commission and the Northwest ADA Center are hosting a webinar series in recognition of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) 31st anniversary. The series kicks off with Disability Rights Activist Judy Heumann, recently featured in the Oscar-nominated documentary “Crip Camp".

When: Tuesdays, July 20 and 27 from noon to 1 p.m.

You can sign up for the free lunch and learn opportunities here.

For more information about the ADA, see Accessibility at ODOT and details about Engineering for Accessibility on the ODOT website. ​



















Contact Us

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PHONE
503-837-3536

COMMENTS
Submit comments to the team through the website.

Related Links

Other projects in the I-205 area