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For Parents

Hearing Screening

Performing a hearing screening on your baby is an important first step in ensuring your child's speech and language development. The hearing screening is easy and painless, and can identify whether more testing is needed. In fact, babies often are asleep while being screened. It takes very little time, usually only a few minutes.
 
All infants should be screened for hearing loss no later than 1 month of age, and it is best if they are screened before leaving the hospital. If the baby does not pass this hearing screening, it's very important to make an appointment for a full hearing test and any needed medical tests no later than 3 months of age.


If Your Baby Refers on Hearing Screening

Follow-Up

All infants should be screened for hearing loss no later than one month of age. If the baby does not pass this hearing screening, it is very important to make an appointment for a full hearing test and any needed medical tests no later than three months of age.

A professional trained to test hearing loss, such as an audiologist or an ear, nose, and throat doctor will be able to perform these tests. The baby's doctor should perform or order any needed medical tests to find out the cause of the hearing loss. Because a newborn baby can pass the hearing screening and still develop a hearing loss, the baby's doctor should routinely follow the baby's general health, development, and well-being.


If Your Child is Diagnosed with a Hearing Loss

Your Child's Hearing and Next Steps

Understanding Your Audiogram (pdf)
This worksheet will help you to learn about your child’s hearing loss and the various terms used to describe it. Your audiologist will indicate which apply to your child by marking the box for the respective ear next to each.


Guide By Your Side

Guide By Your Side is a Hands & Voices program that matches trained parent guides with families who have recently found out their child has a hearing loss.
 
Parent guides, who also have a child who is deaf or hard of hearing, provide unbiased support to families, helping each family make decisions that are right for their child. Through direct peer connections, guides promote self-efficacy and reduce isolation by exploring common bond, shared experiences, wisdom and insight.


Resources for Families

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