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Help Becoming a New Educator

Frequently Asked Questions About Becoming an Oregon Educator

There are several opportunities for financial assistance through TSPC or the Educator Advancement Council (EAC):

Diversity Licensure Expense Reimbursement

Eligible expenses include licensure (new and renewal) and fingerprinting fees, testing (content tests and edTPA), tutoring, and foreign transcript evaluation.

To determine your eligibility for this program, please go to this webpage:

More information on Diversity License Expense Reimbursements

Oregon Administrative Scholars Program

Scholarships are available for diverse candidates enrolled in administrator programs, covering tuition, fees, books, and related classroom materials.

More information on Oregon Administrator Scholars Program

Oregon Teacher Scholars Program

The EAC established the Oregon Teacher Scholars Program to address financial barriers that pose challenges for racially, ethnically and linguistically diverse candidates pursuing a teaching license.

More information on Oregon Teacher Scholars Program

Additional student aid information can be found at Oregon Student Aid or through our Educator Preparation Program partner websites.


To become a teacher in Oregon, you will need to hold a bachelor’s degree, complete a TSPC-approved preparation program, and obtain a teaching license through TSPC. There are several types of programs available in Oregon, and choosing the program type depends on 1) what type of teaching you want to do and 2) how flexible your life circumstances are.


Undergraduate Teacher Preparation Programs

​For individuals who do not yet have a bachelor's degree, but who are interested in teaching should look into undergraduate preparation programs.

Community College
If you are interested in teaching, but don't want to start a 4-year degree program, then the community college path may be right for you. The state of Oregon has a comprehensive Major Transf​er Map for Elementary Education. This document outlines the course-taking path between an Oregon community college and Oregon public university. An individual interested in teaching can take a series of courses in Elementary Education at the identified community colleges, recieve their Associate of Arts Oregon Transfer degree (AAOT-Elementary Education) and apply as a junior at an Oregon public university to complete their bachelor's degree and finish licensure requirements. 

Traditional Undergraduate Licensure Programs
A traditional undergraduate licensure program allows you to complete your teaching preparation, meet licensure requirements and earn your bachelor’s degree. Contact one of Oregon’s approved educator preparation providers​ listed on the TSPC website for more information.


Graduate Teacher Preparation Programs

​For individuals who do have a bachelor's degree, but who have not yet completed an educator preparation program should look into graduate preparation programs. 

Traditional Graduate Licensure Programs
A traditional graduate licensure program allows you to complete your teaching preparation, meet licensure requirements and may lead to a master's degree though its not required. Contact one of Oregon’s approved educator preparation providers listed on the TSPC website for more information.


Other Types of Teacher Preparation
Non-traditional Teacher Preparation Programs
A non-traditional program (sometimes called alternative program) is any program that deviates from the traditional model of university and degree-based teacher preparation. These programs may be offered by a non-profit or for-profit educator preparation provider rather than one housed in a college or university setting. A nontraditional program may also be provided by a university as a non-degree program alongside the university’s traditional degree-granting program. The TSPC is currently working to support partners in expanding nontraditional program opportunities. Please check back for updates!

Career and Technical Education (CTE)
CTE educators provide intentional programs in high wage, in-demand areas, preparing and supporting students in acquiring the technical skills, professional practices, and academic knowledge critical for success in highly-skilled careers. CTE comprises programs offered in six career areas:  Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resource Systems; Arts, Information and Communications; Business and Management; Health Sciences; Human Resources; and Industrial and Engineering Systems.

There are a few ways to get started in CTE:

  1. Email the Oregon Department of Education Teacher Licensure Specialist Margaret Mahoney
  2. Contact the school district where you are hoping to work​
  3. ​Contact the Regional Coordinator assigned to the region of the state in which you want to teach
  4. Contact the Teacher Licensure Program​ you want to attend​

Out-of-State Preparation Programs
There are many educator preparation programs through colleges and universities in other states, or through for-profit organizations that provide opportunities for Oregon residents to gain the content knowledge they need to apply for a teaching license. Individuals who are prepared for licensure out of state need to apply for licensure in that state, and then follow the process for Out of State Applicants.​​​ Please work with your preferred school district to identify an appropriate training program.​​​​​


Working in a School While Earning a Teaching License

There are traditional, nontraditional, graduate and undergraduate pathways to teacher licensure which may allow you to be hired by the school district as a teacher while you earn your license. Examples include the Internship model and the Residency model. Ask your preferred Educator Preparation Provider if these models are offered in their programs. The TSPC is currently working to support a nontraditional pathway that closely aligns with an Apprenticeship model. Please check back for updates on this new initiative. ​​​


​COMING SOON!

There are three categories of school-based mental health professionals that are licensed by TSPC and can get hired in school buildings as a licensed educator: School Counselors, School Psychologists and School Social Workers. Each of these professionals plays a unique role in a school system. ​

Below is some additional information about each of the school-based mental health professions:


School Counseling

Coming Soon!

Available Training Programs
Oregon State University​ (Corvallis and Cascades)

School Psychology

Scope of Practice/Job Role
School psychologists “apply expertise in mental health, learning, and behavior to help children and youth succeed academically, socially, behaviorally, and emotionally. School psychologists partner with families, teachers, school administrators, and other professionals to create safe, healthy, and supportive learning environments that strengthen connections between home, school, and the community” (National Association of School Psychologists, NASP, 2014).

School psychologists are licensed to practice across the Pre-Kindergarten through Grade 12 age range. They provide services to students, families, and schools, across 10 general domains of school psychology practice outlined in the Model for Comprehensive and Integrated School Psychological Services (NASP, 2020; also known as the NASP Practice Model). These practice domains include:
  • Data-based decision making
  • Consultation and collaboration
  • Academic interventions and supports
  • Mental and behavioral health services
  • School-wide practices to promote learning
  • Services to promote safe and supportive schools
  • Family, school, and community collaboration
  • Equitable practices for diverse populations
  • Research and evidence-based practice
  • Legal, ethical and professional practice
Although school psychologists provide services across all practice domains, the specific roles and duties of school psychologists may vary from one school district or school building to the next. For example, some school psychologists may spend more time conducting assessment and consultation activities, while others may spend more time delivering counseling and direct interventions to support academic, behavioral, or social-emotional learning.

Training Requirements
The minimum requirement to be credentialed as a school psychologist is a specialist-level program of study in school psychology (e.g., EdS, MS+, SSP CAGS) that consists of a minimum of 3 years of full-time study at the graduate level, at least 60 graduate semester hours or the equivalent (e.g., 90 quarter credit hours), and a supervised internship taken for academic credit. The supervised internship must include a minimum of 1,200 clock hours, with a minimum of 600 hours in a school setting and completed across 1 academic year on a full-time ​basis or 2 consecutive academic years on a half-time basis. 

Available Training Programs

School Social Work

Coming Soon!

Available Training Program


In Oregon, we have 16 high quality educator preparation providers (EPPs), each with its own strength, vision, and overall definition of what it means to be a competent and capable PreK-12 educator. Some programs emphasize social justice, others focus on relationship building, but all of them are nationally accredited and prepare educators to thrive in Oregon PreK-12 schools.

Selecting the right program is a personal decision with a lot of factors involved including program length, cost, delivery model, location, and others. If you would like help finding the right program, please use the form below to tell us a little more about your needs, and we can help you get started on your search. 

Find a Teaching Program

Career Changes

 CTE educators provide intentional programs in high wage, in-demand areas, preparing and supporting students in acquiring the technical skills, professional practices, and academic knowledge critical for success in highly-skilled careers. CTE comprises programs offered in six career areas:  Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resource Systems; Arts, Information and Communications; Business and Management; Health Sciences; Human Resources; and Industrial and Engineering Systems.


There are a few ways to get started in CTE:

  1. Email the Oregon Department of Education Teacher Licensure Specialist Margaret Mahoney
  2. Contact the school district where you are hoping to work​
  3. ​Contact the Regional Coordinator assigned to the region of the state in which you want to teach
  4. Contact the Teacher Licensure Program​ you want to attend​


Qualifications and Experience

​One way to tell if your program results in a recommendation for licensure is to check whether the program includes a clinical experience component (e.g. Student Teaching) and whether you are required to complete a performance assessment (e.g. edTPA or Local Assessment Option). If you are still not sure, please reach out to the program to confirm.

In order to get a teaching license in Oregon you will need to complete a teaching licensure program, even if you already hold a higher education degree. Once you identify a program you can contact them and they can help you determine the right path toward a license and endorsement and discuss your needs including discussing your personal needs, reviewing your transcripts, and discussing available programs. You can explore available programs here. ​​​​​

There are programs with undergraduate, post-baccalaureate and graduate program options available in Oregon. You can reach out to the program you are most interested in and they will discuss all of the options with you.

If you have a Bachelor's degree and experience teaching, even if you have not yet completed a teaching licensure program, you may be able to qualify for a Restricted Substitute Teaching license or a Restricted Teaching license. These license types require sponsorship from an employer, so you would need to be working with a school district or ESD for sponsorship.

Depending on the endorsement you wish to add, some may require you to complete a program, and others just require a content knowledge test and a practicum. You can find more information about adding endorsements here including which endorsements require a program. If you need to complete a program, you can explore available programs here.

Even if you have not completed a teaching licensure program, you may be able to qualify for a Restricted Substitute Teaching license or a Restricted Teaching License. These license types require sponsorship from an employer, so you would need to be working with a school district or ESD for sponsorship. In order to get a non-provisional teaching license in Oregon you will need to enroll in a teaching licensure program. Once you identify a program you can contact them and they can help you determine the right path toward a license and endorsement and discuss your needs including discussing your personal needs, reviewing your transcripts, and discussing available programs. You can explore available programs here.

​For assistance exploring options to meet content knowledge requirements, please use this form to Contact Us​.​ ​For performance assessment help, please contact an Oregon Educator Preparation Program.

Out of State or Country

In order to get a teaching license in Oregon you will need to complete a teaching licensure program. Once you identify a program you can contact them and they can help you determine the right path toward a license and endorsement and discuss your needs including any personal needs, reviewing your transcripts, and discussing available program options. You can explore available programs here.​​​

You can apply for an Oregon Reciprocal License using the process outlined in this document​. If you held a license or attended a preparation program in another country, please pay close attention to the "Foreign Degrees and Credentials" section.​

Oregon has a wide range of accredited programs with flexibility to meet the unique needs of Oregon teacher candidates. However, TSPC currently only has in-state approved programs, which you can explore here. If you choose to attend an out-of-state program, TSPC cannot guarantee the quality of the program or guarantee you that you can gain an Oregon Reciprocal License upon completion of the program.

You will need to apply for a Reciprocal Teaching License through eLicensing. This process will also require fingerprinting, verification of completion of a licensure program and verification of a bachelor’s degree.

Closed Programs or Expired Licenses

​You will need to contact the program that you attended, work with them to ensure that you have met all of the requirements for licensure, and request that they submit a Program Completion Report.

The easiest thing to do would be to reinstate your license in the other state, then apply for a Reciprocal Teaching License through eLicensing. This process will also require fingerprinting, verification of completion of a licensure program and verification of a bachelor’s degree.

Restricted, Limited, Emergency or Substitute Licensure

To meet the requirements of Emergency Licensure in Oregon, the school district must sponsor the candidate and demonstrate that an emergency situation exists warranting the need for an emergency license. These licenses are not renewable. In addition, the candidate must meet all of the requirements in the rule and submit documentation to support the license application as indicated in the Emergency Teaching section of the First Time Licenses document​​

If you have a bachelor's degree and have not yet completed a teaching licensure program, you may be able to qualify for a Restricted Substitute Teaching license. These license types require sponsorship from an employer, so you would need to be working with a school district or ESD for sponsorship.

Still Need Assistance?

If you still have questions about becoming a new educator in Oregon, please reach out to any of the following:
  1. Any Approved Educator Preparation Provider
  2. The Human Resources department in the district where you want to work 
  3. Your regional Teacher Pathway Navigator or 
  4. Contact us here at TSPC