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Oregon reports 360 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 8 new deaths

Oct. 3, 2020

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed eight more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 571, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 360 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 34,511. The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (1), Benton (7), Clackamas (20), Clatsop (1), Columbia (7), Coos (6), Deschutes (18), Douglas (2), Hood River (1), Jackson (17), Jefferson (3), Josephine (3), Klamath (5), Lane (81), Lincoln (2), Linn (9), Malheur (5), Marion (39), Morrow (3), Multnomah (58), Polk (6), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (21), Union (1), Wasco (2), Washington (36), and Yamhill (5).

Oregon’s 564th COVID-19 death is a 79-year-old man in Umatilla County who tested positive on Sept. 30 and died on Sept. 30 at Kadlec Regional Medical Center in Richland, Washington. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 565th COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on May 26 and died on Aug. 28 in her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 566th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Sept. 8 and died on Sept. 11 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 567th COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Sept. 16 and died on Oct. 1 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 568th COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Sept. 23 and died on Sept. 27. Place of death is being confirmed. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 569th COVID-19 death is a 64-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Sept. 2 and died on Sept. 18 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 570th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Aug. 24 and died on Sept. 11 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 571st COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Aug. 10 and died on Sept. 5 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

See table below for total cases, deaths, and negative tests by county.

County

Cases1

Total deaths2

Negative tests3

Baker

101

2

1957

Benton

348

6

14709

Clackamas

2526

63

65395

Clatsop

225

0

6080

Columbia

198

1

7495

Coos

173

0

7418

Crook

63

1

2714

Curry

32

0

1914

Deschutes

898

12

32339

Douglas

253

4

13494

Gilliam

8

0

290

Grant

10

0

923

Harney

12

0

833

Hood River

254

0

5108

Jackson

1245

6

35046

Jefferson

558

8

4961

Josephine

215

2

12373

Klamath

300

3

10482

Lake

33

0

927

Lane

1440

19

66824

Lincoln

484

13

8940

Linn

562

13

17287

Malheur

1677

30

5455

Marion

4887

98

49952

Morrow

519

6

1833

Multnomah

7455

144

147126

Polk

549

15

9584

Sherman

18

0

345

Tillamook

54

0

3154

Umatilla

3084

42

13570

Union

446

2

4535

Wallowa

33

1

1025

Wasco

305

5

5211

Washington

4746

61

94974

Wheeler

0

0

164

Yamhill

800

14

17648

Total

34,511

571

667,392

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

3This includes cases who test negative and are not epi-linked to a confirmed case.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.