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Oregon Tobacco Facts

About Oregon Tobacco Facts

One of the primary responsibilities of the Oregon Tobacco Prevention and Education Program is to collect and report data about tobacco use and related topics among Oregon adults and youth.

The Oregon Tobacco Facts publication is a collection of this data. It includes tables, graphs and maps that describe tobacco use, economic burden, related diseases, and retail marketing in Oregon.


Oregon Tobacco Facts Table of Contents 

The Oregon Tobacco Facts report includes the following sections.

  1. Executive summary: Overview of the problem of tobacco, and the Oregon Tobacco Prevention and Education Program
  2. Health and economic burden of tobacco: Includes leading causes of preventable death, tobacco-related death rates, and tobacco-related economic costs
  3. Tobacco-related diseases: Includes chronic diseases among smokers, and tobacco-related cancer diagnoses and death rates
  4. Adult cigarette smoking: Includes overall tobacco use, per capita cigarette pack sales over time and cigarette smoking by age, sex, county and other demographics
  5. Youth tobacco use: Includes cigarette smoking and e-cigarette use by grade and county
  6. Targeted communities: Includes tobacco use by race, ethnicity, sexual orientation and other targeted demographics
  7. Retail tobacco environment and marketing: Includes advertising exposure, price information, marketing expenditures, and characteristics of stores that sell tobacco
  8. Citations
The data presented below are updated as new data becomes available and are more current than data available in the printable PDF document.

Suggested citation: Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division, Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention Section. Oregon tobacco facts. Available at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/ph/preventionwellness/tobaccoprevention/pages/oregon-tobacco-facts.aspx.



Section 1: Executive summary

The Oregon Tobacco Prevention and Education Program (TPEP) is a comprehensive program that works to decrease tobacco use across the state.

Together with partners, TPEP works to improve policies and environments that prevent youth use, help adults quit and counter the tobacco industry's targeting of stressed communities. Although communities have taken great strides toward decreasing tobacco use, some Oregonians have benefited more from these changes than others.

Since TPEP began in 1997, cigarette sales in Oregon have declined by nearly two-thirds (Figure 4.1). However, tobacco use remains the number one cause of preventable death and disease in Oregon. It kills nearly 8,000 people each year (Table 2.2). Tobacco use costs Oregonians an estimated $2.9 billion a year in medical expenses and lost productivity (Table 4.2).

This website describes current tobacco use, tobacco-related diseases, disparities and issues impacting you tobacco use throughout Oregon. Some key findings on this site are: 

  • Youth (Figure 5.1) and adult (Table 4.2) cigarette smoking has decreased from 1996 to 2019. However, use of non-cigarette products is on the rise (Table 4.3; Figure 5.1).
  • Data show that more than half of youth and young adults who use tobacco are using flavored tobacco or vaping products (Figure 5.4).
  • In 2018, the tobacco industry spent over $8 billion in marketing, price discounts and promotional allowances for cigarettes and smokeless tobacco (1,2,3). This is almost $22 million per day or almost $1 million an hour.
  • Almost 80% of the tobacco industry's total marketing expenditures for cigarettes and smokeless tobacco products is in the retail environment including convenience stores, pharmacies and grocery stores (3).
  • The tobacco industry spends more than $100 million every year to advertise and promote its products in Oregon's stores (Figure 7.1).
  • The tobacco industry targets people who have faced racism and other discrimination, people with lower incomes and people who are stressed or struggling. For example, about one in three Oregonians with a household income of less than $20,000 a year smoke compared to about one in 10 Oregonians with a household income of more than $50,000 a year smoke (Table 6.1).

While some American Indian tribes use traditional tobacco and other plants for medicinal, ceremonial or religious purposes, when OHA refers to tobacco in this report, it is in reference to commercial tobacco and not the sacred and traditional tobacco used by some American Indian communities.

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Section 2: Health and economic burden of tobacco

Tobacco use affects all Oregonians. Tobacco use is the number-one cause of preventable death and disease in Oregon. Each year, tobacco use kills over 8,000 Oregonians (Table 2.1) and costs almost $5.7 billion in medical expenses and lost productivity (Table 2.4).

The burden of tobacco is not distributed equally. People living with lower incomes, less education, and marginalized social groups smoke at higher rates than other social groups. Consequently, they suffer a disproportionate burden of tobacco-related illness and death. They are also the most exploited victims of predatory marketing practices that capitalize on their lack of education and other vulnerabilities. Additionally, many of these marginalized social groups do not receive adequate access to treatment or protection through general public health policy interventions.

Table 2.1 Leading causes of preventable death, Oregon, 2020

Cause of preventable death
 Estimated number of deaths  
Tobacco use8,200
Obesity, poor diet and physical inactivity  
2,600
Alcohol use 2,200
Illicit drug use1,000
Motor vehicles*500
Firearms600
Influenza & pneumonia400
* Includes alcohol-related crashes.
Source: Oregon Center for Health Statistics, Death data. Unpublished data.

 

Table 2.2 Underlying causes of tobacco-related deaths, Oregon, 2020

Cause of death  Number of deaths    Tobacco-related deaths (%)  
Cancers2,197
27
Cardiovascular diseases2,096
26
Respiratory diseases1,530
18
Other2,391
29
Total tobacco-related deaths  
8,214 100

SourceOregon Center for Health Statistics, Death data. Unpublished data.

 

Table 2.3 Tobacco-related death rates per 100,000 population by county, Oregon

Source: Oregon Center for Health Statistics, Death data. Unpublished data.
Note: Rates are per 100,000 population and are age-adjusted to the 2000 standard population.

 

Table 2.4 Estimated costs of tobacco-related medical treatment and lost productivity (in millions of dollars), Oregon, 2021

   Total costs    Cost of lost productivity    Medical costs  
Oregon 5,691.7 5,453.0 238.5
Baker17.8
16.9
0.9
Benton
35.9
32.9
3.0
Clackamas
245.0
232.5
12.5
Clatsop46.2
41.6
4.6
Columbia49.0
43.7
5.3
Coos114.2
103.8
10.4
Crook30.3
25.3
5.0
Curry34.6
30.9
3.7
Deschutes103.3
94.0
9.3
Douglas
172.0
161.0
11.0
Gilliam
1.9
1.8
0.1
Grant
8.6
7.4
1.2
Harney5.3
4.6
0.7
Hood River12.3
10.9
1.4
Jackson213.4
200.6
12.8
Jefferson20.9
18.1
2.8
Josephine113.9
105.6
8.3
Klamath90.5
82.7
7.8
Lake8.5
6.9
1.6
Lane310.3
295.3
15.0
Lincoln75.0
67.9
7.1
Linn135.6
126.0
9.6
Malheur20.8
20.1
0.7
Marion243.1
228.8
14.3
Morrow8.3
8.0
0.3
Multnomah531.3
505.8
25.5
Polk52.3
48.3
4.0
Sherman
1.5
1.2
0.3
Tillamook38.5
33.8
4.7
Umatilla48.0
44.4
3.6
Union19.6
18.6
1.0
Wallowa4.7
4.3
0.4
Wasco
32.6
28.8
3.8
Washington227.8
215.9
11.9
Wheeler1.5
1.2
0.3
Yamhill85.5
77.5
8.0

Source: Oregon Health Authority. “Economic Costs of Tobacco Use in Oregon”. Calculations Based on Oregon Population Data 2015-2019 and the Department of Health and Human Services (US) Smoking-Attributable Mortality, Morbidity, and Economic Costs (SAMMEC) data, 2021. Unpublished data.

*State and county estimates are calculated on different measures.

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Section 3: Tobacco-related diseases


Tobacco use is a major risk factor for developing chronic diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and asthma (4). Oregonians who smoke are about 35% more likely to have one or more chronic diseases compared to nonsmokers - i.e. 64% vs 47% (5).

When people experience severe or long-lasting forms of stress, health problems like high blood pressure, elevated heart rate, and anxiety develop. People who are part of marginalized social groups experience prejudice and discrimination which can lead using tobacco as a way to relieve the stress. Additionally, under the pressure of this stress, it is harder for people to quit using tobacco.  

About one out of five Oregonians with a chronic disease smoke cigarettes (Table 3.1). Using tobacco worsens outcomes for people living with chronic diseases. Quitting tobacco use and reducing exposure to secondhand smoke decreases the risk of developing certain chronic diseases and improves the health outcomes of those already living with chronic diseases. To advance better health for communities facing disadvantage, tobacco cessation efforts must be tailored to communities that might not be reached by general efforts.   


Table 3.1 Percentage of adults with chronic diseases who smoke cigarettes, Oregon, 2020

 
 Percent (%) 
One or more chronic diseases (1)
18.8
Arthritis22.6
Asthma19.4
Cancer19.5
Cardiovascular disease (2)27.4
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)   
44.0
Depression23.4
Diabetes16.0
(1)  One or more chronic disease includes arthritis, asthma, diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease, depression or chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder. 
(2) Cardiovascular disease includes coronary heart disease, angina, heart attack or stroke. 
Source: Oregon Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Unpublished data.; Note: Estimates are age-adjusted to the 2000 standard population.


Table 3.2 Rate of lung and bronchus cancer diagnoses and death per 100,000 population by county, Oregon, 2015–2019

 
 Rate of new diagnoses    Death rate 
Oregon 51.1 34.7
Baker37.6
40.1
Benton31.7
24.0
Clackamas50.4
30.7
Clatsop61.8
40.1
Columbia
66.2
47.7
Coos64.6
48.4
Crook65.3
39.1
Curry
55.8
45.0
Deschutes39.4
24.4
Douglas58.2
46.9
Gilliam----
Grant31.9
26.2
Harney32.9
27.6
Hood River40.2
32.0
Jackson55.0
36.2
Jefferson60.2
42.4
Josephine61.7
44.7
Klamath56.1
37.1
Lake54.3
36.4
Lane45.7
33.9
Lincoln53.8
42.9
Linn
57.1
44.0
Malheur40.3
32.6
Marion59.6
37.5
Morrow45.0
22.9
Multnomah        
53.8
35.2
Polk50.8
35.4
Sherman----
Tillamook57.4
44.4
Umatilla48.0
35.9
Union37.2
31.0
Wallowa26.1
19.8
Wasco64.7
40.6
Washington42.7
26.0
Wheeler--
--
Yamhill51.0
35.5
Source: Diagnosis data from Oregon State Cancer Registry, death data from Oregon Center for Health Statistics. Unpublished data. 
Note: Rates are per 100,000 population and age‐adjusted to the 2000 standard population.

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Section 4: Adult cigarette smoking

Tobacco prevention and education programs across Oregon began in 1997 and have increased access to tobacco free environments and evidence-based quitting support. Since 1996 (the year prior to the inception of TPEP), the percentage of Oregon adults who smoke cigarettes has declined by 42% (Table 4.2). The decline in adult smoking corresponds with a 61% decrease in per capita cigarette sales since 1996 (Table 4.1). Oregonians are smoking less or quitting entirely. Over half of adult cigarette smokers say they have tried to quit in the past year, and 65% say they want to quit (Table 4.6).

Despite progress, smoking affects some communities more than others.

  • About one in three Oregonians with a household income of less than $20,000 a year smoke. In comparison, about one in 10 Oregonians with a household income of more than $50,000 a year smoke (Table 6.1).
  • Race and ethnicity are also important factors. Thirty percent of American Indians in Oregon smoke compared to 18% of non-Hispanic whites (Figure 6.1).

The environments and systems that have contributed to these disparities must be addressed to reduce tobacco use and tobacco-related diseases. To learn more about smoking disparities, see section six of this website.


Table 4.1: Per capita cigarette pack sales, Oregon and the United States, 1993−2021

 
    Oregon            U.S.       
1993       
98.797.5
199496.690.1
199594.691.6
199694.391.0
199789.590.2
199884.286.8
199979.981.1
200072.077.6
200168.675.6
200266.674.5
200360.971.7
200455.268.1
200553.266.0
200654.764.7
200755.562.4
200850.458.6
200948.455.1
201044.750.1
201147.048.5
201244.746.0
2013
43.344.7
201441.442.1
201540.541.8
201640.0
41.0
2017
38.339.4
201837.236.7
2019
35.035.1
2020
33.634.2
2021
29.633.5

 Orzechowski and Walker, The Tax Burden on tobacco. Historical compilation. Fairfax and Richmond, Virginia.


Figure 4.1: Per capita cigarette pack sales, Oregon and the United States, 1993−2021

Source:  Orzechowski and Walker, The Tax Burden on tobacco. Historical compilation. Fairfax and Richmond, Virginia.

 

Table 4.2.  Percentage of adult cigarette smoking by sex and total, Oregon, 1996–2020

 

Percent (%)

Year        
Total
    Male    
    Female   
1996     23.7    
24.223.1
199720.922.019.7
199822.022.921.1
199921.422.020.9
200021.022.319.8
200120.921.919.8
200221.422.620.1
200321.123.218.8
200420.121.418.7
200518.820.617.0
200618.620.117.2
200717.018.815.3
200815.716.115.4
200917.518.516.4
201020.722.319.1
201120.522.618.4
201218.519.917.2
201317.818.617.0
201416.918.215.7
201517.718.916.5
201617.119.414.9
201717.019.015.0
201816.316.0
16.7
2019
15.1
15.9
14.3
2020
14.1
15.2
13.0
Source: Adult Tobacco Use: Oregon Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Available from: https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/DISEASESCONDITIONS/CHRONICDISEASE/DATAREPORTS/Pages/Substance-use.aspx. 
Note: Estimates are age-adjusted to the 2000 standard population. Data collection and weighting methods changed in 2010. Estimates beginning in 2010 should not be compared to those from earlier years.

 

Table 4.3: Percentage of adult tobacco use, by product type, Oregon, 2014-20

 

Percent (%)
Year     
      Cigarettes      
      E-cigarettes      
    Smokeless tobacco  
  Any tobacco product (1)  
2014
16.98.13.824.3
201517.76.54.125.7
201617.14.44.624.5
201717.04.94.026.4
201816.36.04.625.4
2019
15.1
6.6
3.9
24.6
2020
14.1
5.3
4.1
23.0
(1) Any tobacco product includes cigarette, e-cigarette, smokeless tobacco, large or small cigars or hookah. 
Source: Adult Tobacco Use: Oregon Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Available from: https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/DISEASESCONDITIONS/CHRONICDISEASE/DATAREPORTS/Pages/Substance-use.aspx.
Note: Estimates are age-adjusted to the 2000 standard population.

 

Table 4.4 Percentage of adult tobacco use by age and sex, Oregon, 2020


Percent (%)

 

Cigarette smoking

E-cigarettes

Other tobacco product(1)

Any tobacco product(2)

Age group     

    Male    

 Female 

    Total    

    Male    

 Female 

  Total  

    Male    

 Female 

    Total    

    Male    

 Female 

    Total    

18–24

14.0

9.4

11.8

17.9

12.3

15.2

16.5

5.5

11.3

31.7

21.5

26.8

25–34

17.2

14.7

15.9

7.8

5.5

6.6

15.0

4.8

9.8

31.8

21.1

26.4

35–44

16.5

13.7

15.1

6.5

3.9

5.2

12.9

3.8

8.4

29.1

19.4

24.3

45–54

18.7

14.5

16.6

4.0

3.4

3.7

16.8

2.0

9.3

33.9

18.5

26.1

55–64

13.4

17.1

15.3

1.3^

3.0

2.2

10.5

2.2

6.2

22.9

20.7

21.7

65–74

11.1

12.2

11.7

0.8^

1.4^

1.1

7.2

1.9

4.4

17.8

14.1

15.8

75+

5.9^

3.6

4.6

--

--

--

6.8

1.2^

3.6

11.7

4.5

7.5

^ indicates the estimate may be statistically unreliable and should be interpreted with caution. 
-- this number is suppressed because it is statistically unreliable. 
(1) Other tobacco products include smokeless tobacco, large or small cigars or hookah.
(2) Any tobacco product includes cigarette, e-cigarette, smokeless tobacco, large or small cigars or hookah.
  Source: Oregon Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Unpublished data. 
  Note: Estimates are age-adjusted to the 2000 standard population.


Figure 4.2 Percentage of adult cigarette smoking, by county, Oregon, 2014-2017

Red dashed counties indicates the estimate may be statistically unreliable and should be interpreted with caution. 
Counties filled in white are suppressed because they have statistically unreliable data. 
(1) North Central Public Health District includes Gilliam, Sherman and Wasco counties. 
 Source: Oregon Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System County Combined dataset, 2014 –2017. Unpublished data.
Note: Estimates are age-adjusted to the 2000 standard population.


Table 4.5 Percentage of adult cigarette smoking, by county, Oregon, 2014-2017

  Percent (%)
Oregon
           17.6           
Baker
25.7
Benton9.3
Clackamas16.0
Clatsop23.5
Columbia21.0
Coos27.6
Crook20.3
Curry26.8
Deschutes15.6
Douglas25.1
Grant19.4
Harney14.1^
Hood River14.3
Jackson22.4
Jefferson13.2
Josephine27.5
Klamath22.0
Lake9.5
Lane18.5
Lincoln28.7
Linn19.0
Malheur24.3
Marion16.0
Morrow17.8^
Multnomah17.1
North Central (1)         
20.0
Polk14.6
Tillamook22.2
Umatilla19.6
Union15.1
Wallowa14.4^
Washington11.5
Wheeler--
Yamhill18.5
^ indicates the estimate may be statistically unreliable and should be interpreted with caution. 
-- this number is suppressed because it is statistically unreliable. 
(1) North Central Public Health District includes Gilliam, Sherman and Wasco counties. 
 Source: Oregon Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System County Combined dataset, 2014 –2017. Unpublished data.
Note: Estimates are age-adjusted to the 2000 standard population.


Table 4.6 Percentage of adult smokers by quit status and county, Oregon, 2014–2017

         Wants to quit 
  cigarette smoking (%)    
       Attempted to quit cigarette
    smoking during previous year (%)    
Oregon 65.1 54.4
Baker--46.6
Benton--50.2
Clackamas66.059.0
Clatsop--62.2
Columbia76.449.9
Coos39.151.8
Crook--
45.7
Curry--58.8
Deschutes66.253.2
Douglas66.252.6
Grant----
Harney----
Hood River----
Jackson62.555.3
Jefferson----
Josephine53.043.8
Klamath61.639.6
Lake----
Lane68.358.3
Lincoln73.457.7
Linn64.051.3
Malheur--65.7
Marion62.153.1
Morrow----
Multnomah67.656.3
North Central (1)  
--43.9
Polk--48.6
Tillamook--52.6
Umatilla55.671.5
Union--51.5
Wallowa----
Washington67.252.7
Wheeler----
Yamhill60.752.8
--  this number is suppressed because it is statistically unreliable. 
(1) North Central Public Health District includes Gilliam, Sherman and Wasco counties. 
Source: Oregon Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System County Combined dataset, 2014 –2017. Unpublished data.
Note: Estimates are age-adjusted to the 2000 standard population.


Table 4.7 Percentage of births to mothers who smoke cigarettes during pregnancy, Oregon and the United States, 1993–2020

 
Percent (%)
 Year     
U.S.  Oregon  
1993
15.818.9
199414.618.2
199513.917.9
199613.617.8
199713.216.2
199812.915.2
199912.614.5
200012.213.5
200112.012.8
200211.412.6
200310.712.0
200410.212.6
200510.712.4
200610.012.3
200710.411.7
20089.711.8
20099.311.3
20109.211.3
20118.910.7
20128.710.6
20138.510.2
20148.410.4
20157.710.0
20167.29.6
20176.99.0
20186.58.4
2019
5.97.5
2020
5.56.8

SourcesOregon Center for Health Statistics; National Center for Health Statistics. Unpublished data.

 

Figure 4.3 Percentage of births to mothers who smoke cigarettes during pregnancy by county, Oregon, 2018–2020

Counties filled in white are suppressed because they have statistically unreliable data. 
Source: Source:  Oregon Center for Health Statistics, Birth data. Unpublished data.


Table 4.8 Percentage of births to mothers who smoke cigarettes during pregnancy by county, Oregon, 2018–2020

      Percent (%)   
Oregon
7.6
Baker19.4
Benton
5.8
Clackamas5.2
Clatsop13.4
Columbia10.8
Coos17.1
Crook14.5
Curry16.6
Deschutes6.5
Douglas18.7
Gilliam--
Grant15.8
Harney12.0
Hood River3.1
Jackson10.3
Jefferson10.8
Josephine13.0
Klamath13.1
Lake16.1
Lane10.3
Lincoln15.0
Linn13.4
Malheur11.8
Marion7.3
Morrow7.0
Multnomah4.9
Polk7.8
Sherman--
Tillamook12.3
Umatilla9.4
Union11.7
Wallowa10.1
Wasco8.9
Washington2.3
Wheeler--
Yamhill
8.7
-- this number is suppressed because it is statistically unreliable. 
Source: Source:  Oregon Center for Health Statistics, Birth data. Unpublished data. 

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Section 5: Youth tobacco use

Most addiction to tobacco starts in adolescence. In fact, nine of 10 adults who smoke report that they started smoking before turning 18 (6). Studies show that the younger someone is when they start smoking, the harder it is to quit (7,8).

  • From 1996 to 2019, cigarette smoking among 11th-graders decreased 82% and among eighth graders by more than 88% (Table 5.1).
  • Despite these decreases in youth smoking, many young people still smoke. Many of them will continue to smoke into adulthood.

Non-cigarette use

The rise in use of other tobacco products, such as little cigars, electronic cigarettes and hookah, is also a concern.

  • In Oregon from 2013 to 2019, e-cigarette use among 11th grade kids increased over four-fold from 5% to 23% (Table 5.1).
  • There was a brief decline in e-cigarette use among Oregon youth in 2017. However, e-cigarette use quickly increased to even higher levels through 2019 (Figure 5.1).
  • Over 70% of 8th and 11th graders who have ever use tobacco report E-cigarettes as the first product used (Figure 5.2).
  • Almost half of eighth grade kids and over two in three 11th grade kids report seeing someone smoking or vaping on school properties (Table 5.2).

Less regulation

Non-cigarette tobacco products such as little cigars, electronic cigarettes and hookah are less regulated than cigarettes. Laws in the United States limit flavors, labeling and marketing of cigarettes. Cigarettes can no longer contain flavors other than menthol. Accordingly, cigarette use has declined. Non-cigarette tobacco products by comparison are cheap, available in flavors and come in packaging that appeals to young people. Non-cigarette tobacco products are heavily promoted in convenience stores and other locations accessible to youth.

Flavor appeal

Products with flavors such as electronic cigarettes, little cigars and hookah are more popular among youth and young adults compared to older adults (Table 5.6). More than half of Oregon youth tobacco users use flavored tobacco compared to about 26% of older adult tobacco users (Figure 5.4). Flavors appear to be a key component for youth to start using tobacco (9).

Widely available

Over 93% of stores in Oregon that sell tobacco sell flavored tobacco products (Table 7.2). Almost half of Oregon eighth graders (46%) and 11th-graders (48%) report visiting a convenience store at least once a week (Table 7.4).

Cheap

Flavored non-cigarette tobacco products are cheap. Retailers can sell these products in single units, which reduces the price. Nearly 57% of tobacco stores advertised single little cigars for under $1 many of which are flavored (Table 7.2). Low prices make these products more affordable for young people.


Table 5.1 Percentage of youth cigarette smoking and e-cigarette use, Oregon, 1996–2019

 

Cigarettes (%)

E-cigarettes (%)

Year

  8th grade  

  11th grade  

  8th grade  

  11th grade  

1996     

21.6

27.6

 

 

1997

23.0

24.4

 

 

1998

20.2

31.7

 

 

1999

14.8

26.3

 

 

2000

12.9

22.3

 

 

2001

12.3

19.6

 

2002

10.7

19.9

 

2003

10.5

18.7

 

2004

8.1

16.5

 

2005

9.8

16.9

 

2006

8.7

15.4

 

2007

9.0

16.1

 

2008

8.6

16.0

 

2009

9.9

14.9

 

2010

8.2

14.3

 

2011

6.6

11.5

1.3

1.8

2012

5.6

11.9

 

2013

4.3

9.8

1.8

5.2

2014

4.5

10.0

 

2015

4.3

8.8

9.3

17.1

2016

3.3

7.7

14.0

2017

3.0

7.7

6.3

12.9

2018

2.8

5.8

20.8

2019

2.6

4.9

11.8

23.4

Source: Student Drug Use Survey (1996, 1998, 2000); Youth Risk Behavior Survey (1997, 1999); Oregon Healthy Teens (2001-2009, 2011, 2013, 2015,2017,2019); Student Wellness Survey (2012, 2014, 2016,2018). Unpublished data.

 

Figure 5.1 Percentage of youth cigarette smoking and e-cigarette use, Oregon, 1996–2019

Source: Student Drug Use Survey (1996, 1998, 2000); Youth Risk Behavior Survey (1997, 1999); Oregon Healthy Teens (2001-2009, 2011, 2013, 2015,2017,2019); Student Wellness Survey (2012, 2014, 2016,2018). Unpublished data.

 

Table 5.2 Percentage of youth exposed to tobacco, Oregon, 2019 

  8th graders (%)  
  11th graders (%)  
Saw someone smoking or vaping on school property (current school year)      
42.770.0
Secondhand smoke or vape exposure in the home   
9.18.6

SourceOregon Healthy Teens; https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/DISEASESCONDITIONS/CHRONICDISEASE/DATAREPORTS/Documents/datatables/ORAnnualOHT_Tobacco.pdf.

 

Table 5.3 Percentage of youth tobacco use by product type, Oregon, 2019

 
  8th graders (%)  
  11th graders (%)   
Any tobacco product (1)   
12.924.8
E-cigarettes (2)11.823.4
Cigarettes2.64.9
Little cigars1.32.7
Hookah1.41.4
Smokeless tobacco1.02.5
Large cigars0.71.3
(1) Any tobacco product includes cigarettes, large or little cigars, hookah tobacco, smokeless tobacco or electronic cigarettes or other vaping products. 
(2) E-cigarettes includes those shaped like USB flash drives and Juul. 
Source: Oregon Healthy Teens, unpublished data.

 

Table 5.4 Percentage of youth tobacco product type use by grade and county, Oregon, 2019 

8th Grade

11th Grade

 

  Any tobacco product* (%)  

  Cigarette smoking (%)  

  E-cigarette (1) (%)  

  Any tobacco product* (%)  

  Cigarette smoking (%)  

  E-cigarettes (2) (%)  

Oregon

12.9

2.6

11.8

24.8

4.9

23.4

Baker

11.4

--

9.4

27.3

5.7^

24.0

Benton

8.3^

--

8.0^

21.7^

--

21.3^

Clackamas

12.6

2.6

11.7

27.2

3.1

26.1

Clatsop

19.2

--

16.9

22.9

5.6^

19.6

Columbia

19.5

--

18.4

31.8

--

30.8

Coos

13.0

4.9

12.8

45.2

9.7

42.5

Crook

15.7

3.1^

14.8

24.5

8.3

22.0

Curry

9.6^

--

7.4^

36.3

8.9

33.4

Deschutes

15.4

3.5

14.3

24.4

4.5^

23.6

Douglas

17.9^

7.2^

15.4^

22.0

--

19.3

Grant

--

--

--

20.0

--

--

Harney

13.5

-

--

--

--

--

Hood River

7.3

1.3

7.2

33.3

4.8

30.5

Jackson

12.7

2.0^

12.4

37.9

10.2^

35.8

Jefferson

14.1

2.4

13.0

18.8

3.1^

17.5

Josephine

20.3

5.0

17.5

29.3

6.3

26.4

Klamath

12.0

4.0^

10.7

14.7^

--

10.3

Lake

23.5

--

--

44.4

11.1^

--

Lane

15.7

3.7

15.0

28.1

6.5

26.5

Lincoln

9.0

2.8

7.7

20.3

9.0

17.1

Linn

10.7^

--

10.4^

39.0

9.8

39.0

Malheur

12.8

--

--

5.6^

--

5.5^

Marion

14.8

1.6

13.3

16.4

3.4

15.3

Morrow

12.7

1.4

11.5

23.5

3.1^

20.7

Multnomah

9.8

1.5

8.6

24.5

5.1^

23.1

North Central (3)  

13.2

4.8

11.5

31.8

7.0

31.5

Polk

8.1

1.0

7.8

17.9

3.2

16.7

Tillamook

12.3

2.4

12.3

21.8

3.8^

19.2

Umatilla

18.2

4.5

16.8

26.0

3.2

24.7

Union

13.3

0.9^

12.1

33.6

3.0

33.6

Wallowa

No data collected

No data collected

Washington

9.8

1.7

9.0

19.5

2.8

18.4

Wheeler

No data collected

--

--

--

Yamhill

17.8

--

14.4

17.2

2.8^

16.4

(1)  Any tobacco product includes cigarettes, large or little cigars, hookah tobacco, smokeless tobacco or electronic cigarettes or other vaping products. 
(2) E-cigarettes includes those shaped like USB flash drives and Juul. 
(3) North Central Public Health District includes Gilliam, Sherman and Wasco counties. 
^ indicates the estimate may be statistically unreliable and should be interpreted with caution. 
-- this number is suppressed because it is statistically unreliable. 
Source: Oregon Healthy Teens, unpublished data.


Figure 5.2 Percentage of first tobacco product type used among youth who have ever used tobacco, Oregon, 2019

^ indicates the estimate may be statistically unreliable and should be interpreted with caution. 
Source: Oregon Healthy Teens, unpublished data.


Table 5.5 Percentage and number of sources of tobacco products among youth who have ever used tobacco, Oregon, 2019

    8th grade (%)  
    Estimated number  
of students
  11th grade (%)  
  Estimated number  
of students
Social sources (1)81.24,70078.58,500
Friends under 21 years of age56.83,30057.96,300
Friends 21 years old or older18.11,00029.13,100
A family member17.11,0009.91,100
Took from home without permission  
11.16003.1300
A store or gas station4.220013.01,400
The Internet6.13008.81,000
Some other source20.51,20020.42,200
(1) Social sources include friends under 21, friends 21 or older or a family member.
Source: Oregon Healthy Teens, unpublished data.

 

Figure 5.3 Percentage of cigarette and e-cigarettes use among Oregon youth and adults, 2019

Sources: Oregon Healthy Teens (2019); Behavioral Risk Factors Surveillance System (2019). Unpublished data. 
Notes: Adult data are age-adjusted to the 2000 standard population.

 

Table 5.6 Percentage of current tobacco product use by type and selected age groups, Oregon, 2019

  Percent (%)
 
  8th graders  
  11th graders  
  Young adults (18-24)  
  Older adults (25+)  
Cigarettes2.64.910.8
14.9
Electronic cigarettes  
11.823.418.0
4.5
Large cigars0.71.35.3
2.1
Small cigars1.32.76.1
2.0
Hookah1.41.43.1
1.1
Smokeless tobacco
1.02.54.4
3.5
Sources: Oregon Healthy Teens (2019); Behavioral Risk Factors Surveillance System (2019). Unpublished data. 
Note: Estimates for older adults are age-adjusted to the 2000 standard population.

 

Figure 5.4 Percentage of flavored tobacco or vaping product use among current tobacco users by selected age groups, Oregon, 2019

Sources: Oregon Healthy Teens (2019); Behavioral Risk Factors Surveillance System (2019). Unpublished data.

Back to Table of Contents

Section 6: Targeted Communities

Tobacco use and its resulting health problems are not spread equally throughout Oregon's communities. The tobacco industry has intentionally targeted people facing systemic racism and other discrimination, people with lower incomes and people who are stressed or struggling. Unfortunately, many of these same populations have not received adequate access to treatment or adequate protection through policy interventions that help shape a healthier environment. This leads to large disparities in smoking rates among vulnerable communities.

Targeting

Adding menthol flavoring to cigarettes is a common industry practice to make cigarettes seems less harsh. For decades, the tobacco industry worked to create a product preference for menthol cigarettes among minority populations (10, 11). For example, the industry linked menthol cigarettes to themes of African American empowerment and identity, targeting retail stores and neighborhoods and media, music and magazines(11). Studies show that neighborhoods with higher proportions of African American residents have greater numbers of tobacco advertisements, a larger presence of menthol cigarette advertising and lower prices for menthol cigarettes (10). Unfortunately, people who use menthol cigarettes also have less success in quitting and could be at greater risk of lung cancer (10, 11).

  • African American people smoke at higher rates than white people in Oregon (Figure 6.1).
  • 58% of African American Oregonians who smoke use menthol cigarettes compared to only 15% of white, non-Latino cigarette smokers (Table 6.4).

The tobacco industry has also targeted people with mental illnesses and addictions. They provided cigarettes to psychiatric facilities, sponsored research to show that nicotine alleviates negative mood and blocked smoke-free property policies in mental health and substance use treatment settings (10). People with mental illnesses live 25 fewer years, on average, than the general population, largely because of tobacco-related health conditions (10).

  • Among people who report experiencing poor mental health approximately one in four (26%) smoke while only about one in seven (14%) of people who report not experiencing poor mental health smoke (Table 6.1). 

Policy Protection and Access to Care

As policies that help people quit or prevent youth from starting tobacco use have expanded, communities with higher incomes have benefited more and decreased tobacco use more rapidly relative to communities with lower incomes. For example, while smoke-free homes and housing policies have expanded, people who rent are still more often exposed to secondhand smoke (Table 6.6). In turn, secondhand smoke exposure can cause health problems even among people who don't use tobacco and can make it harder to quit for people who are addicted to quit.

  • About one in three Oregonians with a household income of less than $20,000 a year smoke. In comparison, about one in 10 Oregonians with a household income of more than $50,000 a year smoke (Table 6.1).
  • In addition, 22% of people who rent are exposed to secondhand smoke compared to only 15% of people who own their home (Table 6.6). 

While 65% of people in Oregon who smoke express that they want to quit (Table 4.6), many do not have access to the environments, medication or counseling that are critical to sustaining a successful quit attempt. Smoking cessation support such as receiving advice to quit from a health professional, counseling through phone or internet-based services and medications like Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) are all effective at helping people quit and stay quit, especially when used in combination.

While access to cessation support has expanded throughout Oregon, disparities in access to and use of these resources still exist.

  • People who are ethnic or racial minorities are more likely to report experiencing discrimination when interacting with doctors or the health care system (12) and thus may be hesitant to seek out counseling or medications that could assist with quitting.
  • People who are ethnic or racial minorities or those who are low income are less likely to receive advice to quit from a health care provider, including counseling on how to use cessation medications like NRT (10,13).
  • Oregonians who have no health insurance are offered recommendations and support from health care providers on how to quit tobacco at a much lower rate (42%) than people who have insurance through the Oregon Health Plan (55%) (Figure 6.2)

The persistence of this inequity in the health care system is likely due to many factors including physician bias, lack of resources or a focus on treating other conditions perceived as more urgent.

Communities Leading Change 

The commercial tobacco industry has harmed tribes and Native communities in Oregon for decades by stealing cultural imagery and misrepresenting sacred traditions to sell commercial tobacco products (14, 15).

  • 30% of American Indian and Alaska Native adults smoke cigarettes while only 18% of white, non-Latino adults smoke cigarettes (Figure 6.1)

Investing in culturally specific practices and services is a way to improve access to treatment and counter industry targeting. For example, native-led organizations and Oregon's nine federally recognized tribes are using their tribal culture to treat commercial tobacco use and fight tobacco industry tactics through the Native Quitline. This service was created in partnership with these tribal communities to offer culturally specific help to American Indian and Alaska Native peoples to quit commercial tobacco. It is one way that Native peoples in Oregon can quit commercial tobacco using Indigenous values, supported by a quit coach trained to work with Native peoples.


Table 6.1: Percentage of adult cigarette smoking, by select demographic groups, Oregon, 2019

       Percent (%)    
Annual household income

Less than $20,00030.2
$20,000– $49,999
19.5
$50,000 or more   
10.1
Education

Less than high school graduate24.7
High school graduate or GED
19.7
Some college16.6
College graduate6.8
Insurance

No health insurance
19.0
Have health insurance (1)14.6
Reporting mental health not good for seven or more days in the past 30 days

Experiencing poor mental health25.7
Not experiencing poor mental health
12.3
Served in the U.S. military

Current or former member of the armed forces19.5
Never a member of the armed forces
14.8
Socio-economic status (SES; 2)

Low SES25.5
Higher SES
13.1
Urban or rural residency (3)

Rural
17.2
Urban
15.1
(1) Includes Oregon Health Plan members
(2) Low socio‐economic status includes having less than a high school education or being at 100% or less of the federal poverty level. 
(3) Urban or rural residency was designated using ZIP code level rural-urban commuting area (RUCA) codes. For more information on RUCA codes see http://www.ers.usda.gov/data-products/rural-urban-commuting-area-codes.aspx
Source: Oregon Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Unpublished data. 
Notes: Estimates are age-adjusted to the 2000 standard population.

 

Table 6.2: Percentage of adult cigarette smoking, by sexual orientation, Oregon, 2014-2017

       Percent (%)    
Women

Lesbian women19.3
Bisexual women
27.5
Heterosexual women    
15.6
Men

Gay men22.4
Bisexual men
21.6
Heterosexual men19.4
Source:  Oregon Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Unpublished data. 
Notes: Estimates are age-adjusted to the 2000 standard population.

 

Figure 6.1 Percentage of adult cigarette smoking by race and ethnicity, Oregon, 2015-2017  

Source: Oregon Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Race Oversample, 2015–2017. Unpublished data. 
Note: Estimates are age-adjusted to the 2000 standard population.

 

Table 6.3 Percentage of adult tobacco use(1) among Oregon Health Plan members, by race and ethnicity, Oregon, 2015-2017

 Race/Ethnicity
  Percent (%)  
African American, non-Latino   
37.1
American Indian and Alaska Native, non-Latino  
38.6
Asian or Pacific Islander, non-Latino
18.6
Hispanic/Latino
13.7
White, non-Latino
33.7
(1) Any tobacco product includes cigarette, e-cigarette, smokeless tobacco, large or small cigars or hookah.
Source: Oregon Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Race Oversample, 2015–2017. Unpublished data.

 

Table 6.4. Percentage of adult menthol cigarette use among cigarette smokers, by race, Oregon, 2015-2017

 Race/Ethnicity
  Percent (%)  
African American, non-Latino
58.4
American Indian and Alaska Native, non-Latino Asian or Pacific Islander, non-Latino
17.8
Asian or Pacific Islander, non-Latino
32.9
Hispanic/Latino  
23.7
White, non-Latino
14.7
Source:  Oregon Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Race Oversample dataset, 2015-2017. Unpublished data. 
Note: Estimates for adults are age-adjusted to the 2000 standard population.


Table 6.5. Percentage of menthol cigarette use among cigarette smokers, by age group, Oregon, 2019

 
  Percent (%)   
Adults
19.2
11th grade         
44.6
8th grade
43.0
Sources: Oregon Healthy Teens (2019); Oregon Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (2019). Unpublished data.
Note: Estimates for adults are age-adjusted to the 2000 standard population.

 

Table 6.6: Percentage of adult exposure to any secondhand smoke indoors in a typical week, by demographic groups, Oregon, 2018

       Percent (%)    
Annual household income

Less than $20,00028.1
$20,000– $49,999
22.7
$50,000 or more   
10.0
Employment status

Employed or self-employed  
16.7
Unemployed
32.4
Not in workforce
9.8
Housing status

Rent
21.9
Own
15.0
Urban or rural residency (1)

Rural
22.7
Urban
16.2
(1) Urban or rural residency was designated using ZIP code level rural-urban commuting area (RUCA) codes. For more information on RUCA codes see http://www.ers.usda.gov/data-products/rural-urban-commuting-area-codes.aspx
Source: Oregon Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Unpublished data. 
Notes: Estimates are age-adjusted to the 2000 standard population.

 

Figure 6.2 Percentage of current tobacco users who were offered recommendations or assistance from a health care provider on how to quit at last health care visit by insurance status, Oregon, 2018 

Source: Oregon Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Unpublished data. 
Notes: Estimates are age-adjusted to the 2000 standard population.

Back to Table of Contents

Section 7: Retail tobacco environment and marketing

The tobacco industry spends more than $1 million per hour promoting its products in the United States. (16) In 2018, the tobacco industry spent almost $105 million on marketing in Oregon (Figure 7.1). Almost 80% of the tobacco industry's total marketing expenditures for cigarettes and smokeless tobacco products is in the retail environment including convenience stores, pharmacies and grocery stores (17).

In 2020, the average cost of a pack of cigarettes in Oregon was approximately $6.50 (Table 7.1). However, the price of a pack is often less than that to the buyer, because the tobacco industry provides discounts to offset the price. To offer these discounts to consumers, retailers must follow tobacco company requirements on product placement and advertising in their stores. This increases exposure to promotional advertising and product displays (18). Approximately three out of every five tobacco retailers advertise sales, discounts or other price promotions on tobacco products (Table 7.2).

Appeal to Kids

Tobacco products are often marketed to appeal to kids. They often have candy-like packaging, come in sweet flavors and are advertised or placed in areas where youth are likely to see them (Table 7.3). Three of four youth reported seeing tobacco product ads at a store within the last month, and almost half visited a convenience store in the past week (Table 7.4).

Among stores that sell tobacco in Oregon:

  • Nearly one in five display toys, candy or gum within 12 inches of tobacco products (Table 7.2).
  • More thank one in five place advertisements for tobacco products within three feet of the floor (Table 7.2).
  • Over nine in 10 stores sell flavored tobacco (Table 7.2)., which makes them appealing to young people (19).

Youth Access to Tobacco

Most youth who use tobacco get tobacco from friends, family members or from their home (Table 7.5), whereas over half of adults purchase their cigarettes at convenience stores or gas stations (Table 7.6).

In 2018, Oregon made it illegal to sell tobacco to people under the age of 21. Prior to 2018, it was illegal to sell to those under 18.

  • Among tobacco retailers inspected in 2019, over 15% illegally sold tobacco to underage Oregonians.
  • Small cigars/cigarillos and e-cigarettes are illegally sold to underage youth more frequently than cigarettes (Figure 7.3).
  • Retail sales to underage Oregonians was highest in tobacco shops, followed by small markets and mini marts that also sold gas (Table 7.8).


Figure 7.1 Annual tobacco industry marketing expenditures and Oregon Tobacco Prevention and Education Program funding (in millions of dollars), Oregon, 1998–2019 

Source: Expenditures in Oregon: Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids. "The Toll of Tobacco in Oregon," 2020. https://www.tobaccofreekids.org/problem/toll-us/oregon; Oregon TPEP Funding: Unpublished data. 
Note: Oregon Tobacco Prevention and Education program funding is per biennium.


Table 7.1 Average cigarette pack price in Oregon, Washington and California (1), 1990-2020

   
  Oregon     Washington     California  
1990    
$1.57$1.68
$1.64
1991$1.60$1.77
$1.87
1992
$1.77$1.99
$2.02
1993$1.92$2.02
$2.05
1994$1.78$2.20
$1.90
1995$1.90$2.26
$1.95
1996$1.91$2.47
$1.98
1997$1.98$2.65
$2.00
1998$2.34$2.73
$2.08
1999$2.58$2.87
$2.25
2000$3.24$3.60
$3.51
2001$3.46$3.82
$3.66
2002$3.62$3.95
$3.98
2003$4.05$4.77
$4.08
2004$4.24$4.66
$3.95
2005$4.14$4.73
$3.84
2006$4.23$5.28
$3.95
2007$4.21$5.40
$3.95
2008$4.29$5.51
$4.20
2009$4.29$5.69
$4.29
2010$5.10$6.92
$5.09
2011$5.41$7.61
$5.37
2012$5.52$7.64
$5.40
2013$5.47$7.69
$5.40
2014$5.68$7.75$5.51
2015$5.71$7.82
$5.48
2016$5.91$7.85
$5.61
2017$6.00$7.99
$5.61
2018$6.12$8.18
$7.66
2019$6.33
$8.32
$7.86
2020
$6.50$8.57$8.14
(1) Price includes generic brand 
Source: Orzechowski and Walker, The Tax Burden on tobacco. Historical compilation. Fairfax and Richmond, Virginia.

 

Figure 7.2 Average cigarette pack price in Oregon, Washington and California(1), 1990-2020 

(1) Price includes generic brands.
Source: Orzechowski and Walker, The Tax Burden on tobacco. Historical compilation. Fairfax and Richmond, Virginia.

 

Table 7.2 Percentage of Oregon retailers with tobacco product marketing, 2018

Total number of tobacco retailers(1)          3145       
Among tobacco retailers
(%)
Advertised little cigars for under $156.6
Any tobacco product or advertisement that is displayed in a manner that appeals to youth      
33.0
Tobacco advertisements displayed within 3 ft. of the floor
21.4
Tobacco products displayed within 12 inches of candy or toys19.7
Price promotions displayed for any tobacco product (discounts, 2 for 1, etc.)63.9
Sell flavored tobacco
93.2
(1) Number of stores that sell tobacco or vaping products that are accessible to unaccompanied people under 21 (excludes liquor stores, bars, etc.). Oregon does not require tobacco retailers to be licensed, so this number is likely an underestimate. 
Source: Oregon Tobacco and Alcohol Retail Assessment, 2018. Unpublished data.


Table 7.3 Percentage and number of Oregon retailers with tobacco product marketing by county, 2018

 
Any tobacco product or 
advertisement that  is    
placed in a manner that   
appeals to youth (%)


Tobacco advertisements 
within 3 ft. of the floor (%)  


Tobacco products 12 
inches from toys (%)  


Any tobacco price  
 promotion (%)


Flavored tobacco  
 available (%)


Total number of   
retailers (1)
Oregon
33.0 21.4 19.7 63.9 93.2 3145
Baker9.14.69.168.295.524
Benton26.318.413.284.294.745
Clackamas15.44.412.339.093.4240
Clatsop18.410.513.239.589.549
Columbia25.011.116.786.197.240
Coos21.99.417.267.298.471
Crook39.134.817.460.991.324
Curry35.0
15.025.065.0100.024
Deschutes40.521.632.473.091.9109
Douglas27.320.513.665.997.7146
Grant8.3NA8.358.383.318
Harney80.060.050.0100.070.016
Hood River20.816.78.370.8100.023
Jackson53.344.411.182.295.6172
Jefferson22.216.75.611.1100.027
Josephine37.026.117.484.897.887
Klamath26.622.88.960.887.384
Lake14.314.3NA42.985.714
Lane28.115.818.774.897.1323
Lincoln13.62.311.440.993.260
Linn28.319.619.654.490.2103
Malheur8.34.28.325.087.524
Marion64.745.143.127.594.1224
Morrow40.020.020.070.0100.010
Multnomah30.816.619.873.193.7608
North Central (2)  
29.322.012.273.282.949
Polk46.532.637.290.795.447
Tillamook44.837.917.282.882.833
Umatilla37.034.813.073.995.773
Union7.7NA7.773.1100.028
Wallowa
20.020.0NA90.040.010
Washington36.421.930.753.588.2265
WheelerNANANA100.050.03
Yamhill27.321.210.684.990.972
(1) Number of stores that sell tobacco or vaping products that are accessible to unaccompanied people under 21 (excludes liquor stores, bars, etc.). Oregon does not require tobacco retailers to be licensed, so this number is likely an underestimate.
(2) North Central Public Health District includes Gilliam, Sherman and Wasco counties.
NA = Not applicable.
Source: Oregon Tobacco and Alcohol Retail Assessment, 2018. Oregon Tobacco Retailer Database, 2020. Unpublished data.

 

Table 7.4 Percentage of youths exposed to tobacco advertising, Oregon, 2019

  8th graders (%) 11th graders (%)
Saw a tobacco advertisement on a
storefront or in a store in past 30 days  
75.0
75.5
Visited a convenience store one or
more times in the past week
46.248.0

Source: Oregon Healthy Teens. Unpublished data. 

 

Table 7.5 Percentage of sources of tobacco products and ease of access among youth, Oregon, 2019

 
  8th grade (%)  
  11th grade (%)  )
Source of tobacco (1)  
A store or gas station4.213.0
A social source281.278.5
The internet6.18.8
Some other source20.520.4
Ease of access (2)  
Easy to get cigarettes23.839.1
Easy to get e-cigarettes  
30.656.0
(1) Youth that had used tobacco or vaping products in the past 30 days were asked where they had gotten their products. Responses do not add to 100% because respondents could select more than one source. 
 (2) Social sources include friends, family members or from their home. 
(3) Among all respondents, regardless of whether current tobacco users, percent indicating it would be very easy or sort of easy to get the tobacco product. 
Source: Oregon Healthy Teens, unpublished data.

 

Table 7.6: Percentage of purchase locations for vaping products and cigarettes among adults, Oregon, 2019

Usual e-cigs and vaping products purchase source (among current e-cig users; 2019)     (%)
Store in Oregon
76.5
Store outside of Oregon7.0
Internet13.2
Other
3.3
Usual cigarettes purchase source (among current smokers; 2019) (%)
Store in Oregon96.2
Store outside of Oregon1.4^
Internet--
Other1.9
Usual store type for cigarettes purchase (among current smokers; 2019) (%)
Convenience store or gas station  57.3  
Tobacco shop21.5
Grocery store or superstore8.9
Liquor store1.9
Other (discount, newspaper stand)2.7
Drug store or pharmacy4.1
Don't usually get cigarettes from store3.7
^ indicates the estimate may be statistically unreliable and should be interpreted with caution. 
-- this number is suppressed because it is statistically unreliable. 
Source: Online Panel Survey, 2019, Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention section, Oregon Health Authority, Unpublished data.

 

Figure 7.3 Rate of tobacco sales to underage people by product type, Oregon, 2017-2020 

* Inspections were stopped in March 2020 because of COVID-19. In addition, the peak of the outbreak of e-cigarette, or vaping, product use-associated lung injury (EVALI) occurred in September of 2019, which is included in the 2020 data collection period. Because of these issues, retail violation rates may not be representative of a normal year.
Source: Oregon Tobacco Retail Database, 2020. Unpublished data. 
Note: Year follow the state fiscal year, with inspections generally starting in September of the prior year and continue through June of the published year.

 

Table 7.7 Rate of tobacco sales to underage people by Oregon county, 2017-2020(1)

 
Retailer violation rate (RVR), Percent (%)
 
    Overall RVR     
     Cigarettes    
    Cigarillos / Small cigars    
    E-cigarettes     
Oregon
16.2 15.5 17.7 19.2
Baker
26.125.0
0.0100.0
Benton5.35.90.00.0
Clackamas17.316.310.036.8
Clatsop9.712.50.00.0
Columbia16.315.90.0100.0
Coos13.811.60.037.5
Crook11.811.50.014.3
Curry25.024.0100.00.0
Deschutes8.17.015.46.7
Douglas16.416.80.018.8
Gilliam0.00.00.00.0
Grant19.222.70.00.0
Harney16.714.30.050.0
Hood River6.57.10.00.0
Jackson19.617.826.320.6
Jefferson17.920.80.00.0
Josephine
24.326.822.216.7
Klamath22.020.630.820.0
Lake0.00.00.00.0
Lane19.818.326.925.0
Lincoln15.716.733.37.1
Linn11.99.416.725.0
Malheur2.80.00.09.1
Marion16.418.26.912.0
Morrow15.418.20.00.0
Multnomah15.313.618.220.8
Polk
24.123.350.018.2
Sherman18.220.00.00.0
Tillamook12.29.725.016.7
Umatilla         
15.916.120.010.0
Union12.511.833.30.0
Wallowa13.320.00.00.0
Wasco6.14.016.70.0
Washington16.216.716.713.3
Wheeler25.025.00.00.0
Yamhill17.814.90.031.8
(1) Inspections were stopped in March 2020 because of COVID-19. In addition, the peak of the outbreak of e-cigarette, or vaping, product use-associated lung injury (EVALI) occurred in September of 2019, which is included in the 2020 data collection period. Because of these issues, retail violation rates may not be representative of a normal year. 
Source: Oregon Tobacco Retail Database, Combined years 2018-2020. Unpublished data.

 

Table 7.8 Rate and number of tobacco sales to underage people by store type, Oregon, 2017-2020(1)

 
2017
2018 
2019 
2020 
Store type
  Total Inspected  
%
  Total Inspected  
%
  Total Inspected  
%
  Total Inspected  
%
Department store758.0
506.0679.05010.0
Drug store
593.44816.7537.5326.3
Grocery store10015.09215.29016.74515.6
Market98
15.38327.79220.77915.2
Mini mart446  14.6  
38116.340715.225012.8
Mini mart with gas  
30419.1  253  
21.3233  15.5  
16918.9
Tobacco shop1030.014  28.6  
1323.111  36.4  
Vape shop00.01118.21323.1137.7
Other4214.34122.04131.73813.2
(1) Inspections were stopped in March 2020 because of COVID-19. In addition, the peak of the outbreak of e-cigarette, or vaping, product use-associated lung injury (EVALI) occurred in September of 2019, which is included in the 2020 data collection period. Because of these issues, retail violation rates may not be representative of a normal year. 
Source: Oregon Tobacco Retail Database, 2020. Unpublished data. 
Note: Year follow the state fiscal year, with inspections generally starting in September of the prior year and continue through June of the published year.

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Citations

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