Energy in Oregon

​Together with state and federal partners, ODOE helps create standards which will reduce energy consumption, will meet consumer needs, and can be implemented by manufacturers.
Water CoolersThe Oregon Department of Energy coordinates with local partners, other states, and national experts to review the minimum state energy efficiency standards and evaluate opportunities to update existing standards or adopt new standards to promote energy conservation in Oregon, achieve cost effectiveness for consumers, or as the result of federal action or the outcome of collaborative discussions with manufacturers and other states.


Background

While some appliance efficiency standards are set at the federal level, there are also products that do not yet have a national standard and for which a state standard could achieve meaningful energy and water savings and greenhouse gas reductions. Oregon has periodically enacted appliance efficiency standards as a method of saving consumers money and saving energy. Appliance efficiency standards provide the potential for significant cost savings and greenhouse gas reduction.

In 2005, Oregon established its first appliance energy efficiency standards for 11 product categories. Oregon subsequently added 6 new standards in 2007, 3 more in 2013, and most recently 9 new standards and 2 updated standards in 2021. Often, federal standards are later modeled after standards that were first enacted at the state level. Once adopted at the federal level, federal standards preempt state standards. Thirteen of Oregon’s previous appliance standards have been preempted by the federal government.


Energy Efficiency Standards

Oregon has established standards for multiple products that are not currently federally regulated, including:

  • DVD players and recorders - SB 375 (2007)
  • Commercial hot food holding cabinets  - SB 375 (2007)
  • Compact audio products, like MP3 players - SB 375 (2007)
  • Bottle-type water dispensers / water coolers – SB 375 (2007), updated in HB 2062 (2021), new standard effective for products manufactured on or after 1/1/2022
  • Portable electric spas – SB 375 (2007), updated in HB 2062 (2021), new standard effective for products manufactured on or after 1/1/2022
  • Televisions – SB 692 (2013)
  • Large battery charging systems – SB 692 (2013)
  • Halogen lamps​ - SB 692 (2013)
  • High CRI fluorescent lamps - HB 2062 (2021), standard effective for products manufactured on or after 1/1/2023
  • Computers and computer monitors - HB 2062 (2021), standard effective for products manufactured on or after 1/1/2022
  • Residential ventilating fans - HB 2062 (2021), standard effective for products manufactured on or after 1/1/2022
  • Faucets - HB 2062 (2021), standard effective for products manufactured on or after 1/1/2022
  • Shower heads - HB 2062 (2021), standard effective for products manufactured on or after 1/1/2022
  • Electric storage water heaters - HB 2062 (2021), standard effective for products manufactured on or after 1/1/2022
  • Commercial dishwashers - HB 2062 (2021), standard effective for products manufactured on or after 1/1/2022
  • Commercial fryers - HB 2062 (2021), standard effective for products manufactured on or after 1/1/2022
  • Commercial steam cookers - HB 2062 (2021), standard effective for products manufactured on or after 1/1/2022

Executive Order 17-20

ODOE has been active in evaluating the landscape for potential standards for improved energy efficiency and cost savings for Oregonians, supported by directives from recent Executive Orders. EO 17-2​0 in 2017 directed ODOE to identify categories of appliances for improved efficiency, and after researching other state activity and conducting outreach to stakeholders and industry ODOE issued a report in November 2018 that identified a suite of established standards that could potentially apply for Oregon.

Executive Order 20-04

In March 2020, Governor Brown signed EO 20-04, directing State of Oregon agencies to take action to reduce and regulate greenhouse gas emissions​ toward meeting reduction goals of at least 45 percent below 1990 emissions levels by 2035 and at least 80 percent below 1990 levels by 2050.​ 

In addition to the general directives for all agencies, EO 20-04 built upon the directives in EO 17-20 and provided a specific list of products for ODOE to establish energy efficiency standards. 

In 2020, ODOE hosted multiple rounds of stakeholder engagement and outreach, conducted rulemaking, and filed the final rules on August 28, 2020.  These rules are effective on September 1, 2021. In total, ODOE’s 2020 rulemaking adopted 11 standards, including 9 new standards and 2 updated standards.  All of the new standards for Oregon are already established in other locations and align with standards and product definitions already in place in other West Coast states and multiple other states around the country. Most of the Oregon standards will apply to products manufactured after January 1, 2022 (with the exception of high CRI lamps, which is one year later).  An important note is that the effective date is based on the date of manufacture, so existing inventory and stock of any products manufactured before that date may still continue to be sold.  Also, existing equipment may remain in-service.

House Bill 2062 (2021 Legislative Session)

As described above, in 2020, as part of Executive Order 20-04 implementation, the Oregon Department of Energy adopted efficiency standards for 11 different products through administrative rule. HB 2062 conformed statute to those recently adopted rules, as specified in ORS 469.261. These new standards will save Oregonians money, promote energy conservation in Oregon, reduce energy and water use, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and align West Coast market standards. ODOE estimates that the energy efficiency standards established and increased in HB 2062 represent a greenhouse gas reduction of nearly 50,000 metric tonnes of annual CO2 emissions in 2025 and a reduction of over 100,000 metric tonnes of CO2 emissions in 2035 to contribute to Oregon’s greenhouse gas reduction goals.  These standards also are estimated to lead to nearly $30 million of annual energy cost saving for Oregonians in 2025, increasing to nearly $100 million in savings by 2035.  

HB 2062 also implemented housekeeping measures to remove from statute those existing state standards that have been preempted by federal standards since originally established in Oregon. Finally, HB 2062 provided ODOE, in consultation with DCBS Building Codes Division Advisory Boards, limited authority to administratively update standards to a more recent version only for products with existing Oregon standards.

ODOE will continue to do its part to help Oregon achieve our emissions reduction goals by establishing and updating standards for products at least to levels equivalent to the most stringent standards among West Coast jurisdictions.

ODOE will conduct administrative rulemaking in the 2021 to implement the changes made in HB 2062. Sign up to receive email updates (under Rulemaking - Appliance Standards). ​

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